Tulane Home Tulane Shield logo linking to site home page

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions and Lost Children Archive. She is the recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship and the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, The Carnegie Medal, an American Book Award, and has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kirkus Prize, and the Booker Prize.

From Brazil to El Salvador, prison gangs have transformed the state's disciplinary institutions into headquarters for building drug empires, organizing street crime, and orchestrating terrorist attacks capable of bringing the state to heel. At the same time, they govern, “providing order and physical safety for millions of low-income residents across vast informal peripheries neglected by governments.

In this talk, Laura-Zoe Humphreys contextualizes the current 27N protest movement within a longer history of Cuban artists and intellectuals’ effort to counter censorship and negotiate a new relationship between dissidents and revolutionaries and between Cubans on the island and the diaspora.

Join us for an evening with Elizabeth Acevedo. Acevedo presents her third book, Clap When You Land, and discusses her writing process and performance background. The discussion will be followed by a reading.

This Thursday the course “Gateway to the Americas”: The Roots & Routes of Latinx New Orleans (Tide 1375-01) will be holding panel discussion

—open to all students—

Discussing the conditions for immigrants and asylum seekers in New Orleans during the Covid crisis. The panelists will also address how students can get involved with immigrant advocacy and defense.

Panelists will include:

The Gilder Lehrman Center’s 22nd Annual International Conference provides a forum for discussion of the study of Cuban slavery and emancipation today, placing the island’s history within the wider Atlantic world. Over the past few decades, the study of Cuban history has been an increasingly international effort. Cuban historians have interacted more and more with colleagues from abroad, with discussions grounded in the unique primary sources found in the rich Cuban archives.

Join us for an informal conversation hour with members of BRASA. All levels welcome. No registration necessary – come and stay for a few minutes or the whole hour! For more information, please contact Megwen at portuguese@tulane.edu.

Conflict over the tenure of Haitian president Jovenel Moise represents a critical moment for Haitian democratic society. The discussion brings together a panel of homegrown experts, each with a distinct disciplinary perspective, to discuss the Moise power grab, the opposition reaction, and the future of democracy in Haiti.

Learn more about the Cuban and Caribbean Institute’s flagship study abroad program. Summer in Cuba is open to Tulane and non-Tulane undergraduate students from all years and majors. Plus, public Health majors have a unique opportunity to earn credits abroad with the Public Health in Cuba track.  

On/Off Screen. The Other Histories of Cinema in Latin America / Las otras historias del cine en América Latina explores practices of film distribution, exhibition and cinemagoing in Latin America. Over the past decade, the receiving end of the film chain, including patterns of film distribution and exhibition and the experiences of cinemagoers, has received increasing scholarly attention. Although this turn has made inroads beyond Eurocentric, Anglo-American limits, there is still a need to highlight other important cinematographic regions, especially Latin America.

Pages