Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University


The principal strengths of the Center include the following:

  • Tulane is one of four continuously funded Latin American National Resource Centers, and has long occupied a critical position as the only Latin American National Resource Center in the Deep South (AL, AR, LA, MS, and TN). Nationally, few institutions of Tulane’s size compare in the number of faculty, students, library resources, and research support for Latin American studies.
  • The Stone Center has an endowment of $15 million, principally from the Zemurray Foundation; it stands today perhaps as the largest of any National Resource Center in the country. In 2004-05 alone it was awarded grants from Louisiana Board of Regents, Rockefeller Foundation, Tinker Foundation, and Zemurray Foundation.
  • The Stone Center’s faculty averages 74 core Latin Americanists, 25 affiliates, 8 visiting professors, and 3 post-doctoral fellows, which represents the largest contingent of faculty associated with any department or program on the Tulane campus. In addition, the Stone Center is administered by 8 professional staff.
  • In the period 2000-2005, Tulane awarded 88 Ph.D.s with Latin American foci in Spanish and Portuguese (25), Anthropology (19), Latin American Studies (15), History (6), Business Administration (5), Political Science (4), Sociology (3), French (2), Economics (1), EEB (1), Geology (1), Parasitology (1), Public Health (1), and Social Work (1).
  • The most recent Gourman Report, Undergraduate Programs (1997) ranked Tulane’s Latin American Studies undergraduate program second in the United States.
  • In 2005 alone, 50 undergraduate students graduated with a Latin American Studies major or minor; 5 majors graduated with honors.
  • As of Fall 2005 there are a total of 36 students enrolled in the graduate program in Latin American Studies, 19 of which are in the Masters program.
  • Tulane is one of three Latin American National Resource Centers that offer an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program; as of Fall 2005 there are 12 students enrolled.
  • The Stone Center’s interdisciplinary graduate program on average admits 12-15 students each year.
  • Latin American Studies GRE scores also continue to rise. According to our internal records, scores averaged 1243 for students admitted in Fall 2001, 1194 in Fall 2002, 1306 for Fall 2003, 1216 in Fall 2004, 1260 in Fall 2005, and 1270 in Fall 2006. Declines often correlate with the number of non-English speaking students admitted in a given year.
  • Ph.D. placements are strong. Of the 20 PhDs awarded since summer 1999, ten are in tenure-track academic jobs, two are in research positions, two are visiting faculty, two are in government, one is a university administrator, one a medical doctor, one a librarian, and one is currently on the academic job market.
  • Tulane’s professional schools provide training options in a wide variety of fields and the Stone Center offers joint degree programs in Business and Law. In 2004-05, the professional schools offered eighty-one courses with more than 25% Latin American content with total enrollments of 2,419 (Architecture 9, Social Work 2, Law 8, Business 13, and Health Sciences 49).
  • Over the last three years, the Stone Center funded 26 summer field research grants for faculty and professional librarians (averaging $1,899 each), provided $22,481 in airfare and per-diem for 64 trips for travel to professional meetings, and awarded over $20,000 for editorial, translation, and publication subsidies and for staff and TAs to attend 15 professional development workshops.
  • In the two-year period 2003-2005, Tulane students participated in twenty-three different study abroad programs in fourteen Latin American and Caribbean countries: Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Peru, and Trinidad & Tobago. In 2003-2005, the average yearly enrollments for summer programs by destination country were: Belize (7), Chile (17), Costa Rica (25), Cuba (62), the Dominican Republic (14), Guatemala (20), Mexico (20), Peru (7), Trinidad and Tobago (10).
  • The Stone Center offers a variety of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs), Portuguese, Kaqchikel Maya, Yucatec Maya, Haitian Creole, and Nahuatl. Tenured or tenure-track faculty teach Portuguese and Kaqchikel. Native language instructors under the supervision of tenured faculty members teach the others. Yucatec and Nahuatl are taught in alternate years on campus with the assistance of native informants who work individually with each student.
  • Tulane’s Latin American Library (LAL) comprises 19% of the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library and occupies one sixth of its floor space. Tulane’s holdings of 420,000 place it among the top four institutions (Texas, Harvard, Yale, and UCSD) who reported to the SALALM survey for 2003-04. In that report, LAL’s number of volumes received annually ranked sixth and its acquisition expenditures seventh. In SALALM’s last report on FTEs in 1999-2000, Tulane’s total FTEs dedicated to Latin American resources ranked third.
  • In the natural sciences, federal funding helped establish a new Ecology and Evolutionary Biology line in tropical biology. Today the department has five tropical biologists working in Latin America.
  • The Stone Center also supports the Latin American Resource Center (LARC), whose mission is to promote the study and understanding of Latin America through a broad range of programs that insure high academic quality and content that is accessible and relevant for our diverse audiences. LARC’s lending library is widely recognized as the largest available collection of audio-visual and curriculum materials on Latin America for educators nationwide. The library includes over 4,000 items.




All Events

Upcoming Events

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

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Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

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Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Office of Multicultural Affairs: International Food and Music Festival

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The International Food and Music Festival is a tradition for Tulane University and the surrounding New Orleans community. It is not possible without the participation of the international community at Tulane. We need your help to represent your culture, country, or community. Share food, crafts, cultural history, language, performance, and have fun at this beautiful outdoor festival.

This event is FREE for all Tulane faculty, staff and students. You must present your Splash Card. Non-affiliated Tulane attendees can purchase tickets here.

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here for more information and registration.

If you have questions, email or

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pave

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Bate Papo! End your Friday afternoon on the Jones Hall patio with a classic Brazilian layer dessert. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at