Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Financial Aid, Research Support, and Prizes

Academic Year

Students accepted into the M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Latin American Studies are eligible for two types of aid: Tulane University Graduate School Fellowships and U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Study (FLAS) Fellowships. Although the amount of financial aid and the general policies and procedures for students holding these fellowships are similar, there are fundamental differences. Graduate School Fellowships include a service requirement as Project Associates for M.A. students and as Teaching Assistants or Project Associates for Ph.D. students, while FLAS Fellowships require that fellows remain continuously enrolled in Portuguese or Haitian Creole. Both are subject to the same regulations regarding incompletes and the maintenance of minimum grade point averages.

All fellowships are awarded on a yearly basis. Recommendation for fellowship continuation is made to the Graduate School every spring semester following an evaluation of student performance over the course of the academic year.

M.A. students in good standing may receive no more than four continuous semesters of funding; three continuous semesters if they take the non-thesis option. If a student chooses to transfer two courses from another Tulane department or another university towards his/her M.A. course requirement, he/she may receive no more than three continuous semesters of funding with a thesis, and no more than two continuous semesters without a thesis.

Joint M.A./M.B.A and joint M.A./J.D. students in good standing receive no more than two continuous semesters of funding. This funding is exclusively for study in the School of Liberal Arts and is not transferable to either the Freeman School of Business or the Law School. Joint degree students should seek funding for the M.B.A. or J.D. portions of their program from the respective professional schools.

Ph.D. students in good standing who already possess an MA degree may receive no more than four continuous years or eight continuous semesters of funding. Eight semesters of funding are not an entitlement and the number of semesters of funding will vary not only according to faculty recommendations about a student’s program of study, but also according to the transfer credit hours awarded to the student for previous graduate level work.

Joint LAST/Art History Ph.D. students in good standing who already possess an MA degree may receive no more than four continuous years or eight continuous semesters of funding. Eight semesters of funding are not an entitlement and the number of semesters of funding will vary not only according to faculty recommendations about a student’s program of study, but also according to the transfer credit hours awarded to the student for previous graduate level work. Joint LAST/Art History Ph.D. students who are admitted directly to the program with only a Bachelor’s degree and no transferable graduate credit hours may receive no more than five continuous years or ten continuous semesters of funding. Ten semesters of funding are not an entitlement and the number of semesters of funding may vary according to faculty recommendations about a student’s program of study.

Students who take a leave of absence for whatever reason during their continuous fellowship period are not guaranteed funding for future semesters beyond the terms required to earn the corresponding degree. For details on Leaves of Absence, please consult the appropriate section below.


Tuition waivers do not apply to courses taught on-campus in the summer. The only exception to this general rule is the extremely rare situation when a summer course completes the number of credits required for graduation in that same summer. And even in such a rare situation, students must seek explicit approval for this from the Graduate Advisor and the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts. FLAS fellowships are available for intensive summer language study in Less Commonly Taught Language (i.e. Portuguese, Haitian Creole, Kaqchikel Maya, Yucatec Maya, Nahuatl, etc.). See section on Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships (FLAS) for more information.

Stone Center Summer Research Fellowships are awarded on a competitive basis for research projects in Latin America. Graduate students from any discipline may apply as long as their research has a Latin American focus. Application forms and instructions are available online at the Stone Center’s website. In short, applicants must provide a detailed outline of their project goals, methodology, itinerary, schedule, and work plan. Applications are due usually in early March. Preference will be given to projects that are feasible, well-conceived, and have strong faculty support. Applicants who have not previously received a Stone Center Summer Research Fellowship will have first priority. Award amounts usually cover round-trip airfare plus modest living costs. No awards are given to students with outstanding incompletes. Recipients are required upon their return to present their findings at a symposium organized and sponsored by the Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO); and recipients must also prepare and submit electronically a brief, 1-2 page report on their summer research experience to be posted on the Stone Center website.

Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowships (FLAS)

With funding for the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies is able to offer a special fellowship program to a select group of students. The goals of the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship program include: assisting in the development of knowledge, resources, and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area/international studies; stimulating the attainment of foreign language acquisition and fluency; and developing a pool of international experts to meet national needs. FLAS fellowships are available to those graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and are in need of attaining language proficiency in Portuguese, Haitian Creole, or an indigenous Latin American language. There are awards available for both the academic year as part of the regular admissions process and for summer intensive language study for currently enrolled graduate students.

Academic year FLAS fellowships are awarded to those graduate students in Latin American Studies, Humanities, Social Sciences, or professional school programs at Tulane University whose program of study requires Portuguese or Haitian Creole. Benefits of an academic year FLAS fellowship include: a service-free fellowship stipend and, for graduate students enrolling in the School of Liberal Arts, a tuition waiver provided by the School of Liberal Arts. Graduate students not enrolling in the School of Liberal Arts are not eligible for the corresponding tuition waiver. Those students receiving a FLAS fellowship during the academic year must register for their required language course over and above the normal course load of nine hours. Priority for funding of academic year FLAS fellowships goes to those students who demonstrate a need for proficiency in Portuguese or Haitian Creole.

Summer FLAS fellowships allow graduate students to engage in intensive study of less commonly taught languages such as Kaqchikel Maya, Portuguese, Yucatec Maya, Nahuatl, Quechua, or any other indigenous Latin American language for which an approved summer program is offered. Summer FLAS fellowships consist of funds for tuition and fees; a subsistence allowance; and, when available, funds for round-trip airfare. Priority funding is given to those students who wish to attend Tulane’s Kaqchikel Maya Intensive Summer Institute, or Tulane’s Summer Portuguese language program. Information on these programs is available on the International Programs page of the Stone Center website. The competition for funding occurs early in the Spring semester. Students who are interested in applying for summer FLAS funding should consult with the Graduate Advisor.




All Events

Upcoming Events

Africana Studies Brown Bag Lecture with Prof. Dan Sharp

View Full Event Description

Naná Vasconcelos: Afro-Brazilian Percussion in Paris and New York City

Dan Sharp is currently conducting research for a book that revolves around the 1980 album Saudades by Afro-Brazilian Naná Vasconcelos. The book will situate Naná‘s reimagining of percussion and voice in the context of his itinerant life in New York, Europe and Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. Snacks provided!

New Worlds, Indigenous Technologies and European Cabinets of Curiosities

View Full Event Description

“New Worlds, Indigenous Technologies and European Cabinets of Curiosities”
Lecture by Dr. Surekha Davies

In the early modern period, European perceptions of distant peoples shifted from curiosity and admiration to a growing conviction that Europe resided at the top of a cultural, technological, and racial hierarchy. Making knowledge about both humans and the natural world became increasingly visual pursuits. This paper explores descriptive methods and classificatory schemes for overseas artifacts through the close reading of inventories and catalogs of early modern curiosity cabinets. It argues that these texts were material and discursive objects that helped to constitute cultural hierarchy through typologies of objects. The processes of inventorying human variety also shaped European identities in relation to both classical antiquity and to the material antiquities of new worlds.

Dr. Surekha Davies is Assistant Professor of History at Western Connecticut State University. She writes on cultural encounters, visual and material culture, cartography, monster theory, collecting, and the history of mentalities. Her first book, Renaissance Ethnography and the Invention of the Human: New Worlds, Maps and Monsters (Cambridge University Press, 2016), won the 2016 Roland H. Bainton Prize in History from the Sixteenth Century Society & Conference, and the 2016 Morris D. Forkosch Prize from the Journal for the History of Ideas. Dr. Davies is currently working on a new book project, Collecting Artifacts in the Age of Empire, and is a Mellon longterm fellow at the Folger Shakespeare Library for 2017-18.

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

View Full Event Description

What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

View Full Event Description

Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

View Full Event Description

Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

View Full Event Description

Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English