Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Ph.D. in Art History and Latin American Studies

This new joint program will be small and highly selective. It will probably accept only one or two highly qualified applicants each year, based on recommendations, performance, and other indicators of academic excellence and the ability to conduct original, clearly articulated research that will advance the frontiers of knowledge. Prospective students should submit their application to this joint Ph.D. program by clicking here, where you can read relevant information on the application process and where you can find the link to the actual online application system in the “APPLY HERE” section of the page.

Students are admitted to the program only after demonstrating an ability to work in a critical and imaginative fashion. Along with the School of Liberal Arts graduate program application form, applicants submit transcripts, GRE scores, three letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, evidence of language ability, and an M.A. thesis or two substantive research papers.

The Ph.D. requires 54 credit hours (including an M.A. thesis or equivalent) in addition to qualifying examinations in two concentration areas and the production of a dissertation. Of the 54 credit hours of coursework, at least 30 hours must have a Latin American content, including at least 18 hours in Latin American art; other Latin American courses can be taken in departments such as Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese; the School of Architecture; and Latin American Studies special offerings. Fifteen credit hours must be in art history pertaining to areas outside Latin America. The balance of credit hours are electives; they may be in art history and/or Latin America, but they may also pertain to other areas relevant to the student’s work (e.g., European history, Medieval thought, writing systems). The Latin American Studies core seminar is required, as is a course on art historical method and/or theory. All courses must be at the 6000 and 7000 levels.

Students must develop a primary concentration (e.g., Pre-Columbian, colonial, or modern) and a secondary one. The second concentration may be within Latin American art (e.g., Pre-Columbian, colonial, or modern), or it may cover a comparative area (e.g., modern Latin American art paired with modern European art, or colonial Latin American art paired with medieval and early modern European art). Twenty-one semester hours (7 courses) must pertain to the primary concentration, and 12 semester hours (4 courses) must pertain to the secondary concentration. These courses may be in Art History or other disciplines with Latin American content. For example, a student with a primary concentration in Precolumbian and a secondary concentration in colonial would take 7 art history and anthropology courses with a Precolumbian content, and 4 courses with a colonial content in art history, history, or literature.

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Central America: People and the Environment Asynchronous Institute

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Register now for the ASYNCHRONOUS COURSE which opens up in July
Please note, the synchronous blended institute taking place June 14 – 25 is no longer accepting registrants.

This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment. It is not required to have participated in past institutes to join us.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University is excited to host and coordinate this year’s institute. Tulane University and New Orleans are both unique and important places to explore the deep connections to Central America with a focus on people and environment. With presentations by leading historians and sociologists on Central America, environment and race we are excited to share the work and resources from presenters as well as the unique resources at Tulane.

YOU MAY REGISTER FOR THE ASYNCHRONOUS COURSE WHICH OPENS UP IN JULY

NOW REGISTERING FOR THE ASYNCHRONOUS INSTITUTE For more information, please email dwolteri@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164. Space is limited.