Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Click on curriculum unit title in order to register/log-in for complete access.
If you encounter a problem accessing these resources, please email us at crcrts@tulane.edu or call us at 504.862.3143.

TEACH THE MAYA with these resources created by LARC!

  • Introducing the Ancient Maya to the Classroom – This curriculum packet, developed by archaeologist Diane Davies in 2010, provides an introduction to the study of the Ancient Maya and suggests several classroom activities as well as additional resources.
  • Maya Culture in the Classroom – These materials were assembled for the 2002 Tulane Maya Symposium Teacher Workshop and provide information about the Ancient Maya and a variety of activities to introduce the Maya into the K-12 classroom.

ONLINE CURRICULA BY LARC

  • Ancient Civilizations – Spring 2020 K-12 workshop series on ancient civilizations provided K-12 educators the opportunity to explore ancient civilizations. Lesson plans were created by two local educators on behalf of the Latin American Resource Center and S.S. NOLA. The curriculum unit was created by Brittney Dayeh, and William Gillispie, both K-12 educators at Lusher Charter School in New Orleans, Louisiana as well as PhD candidate, Catherine Nuckols-Wilde developed for the elementary Social Studies and high school History classroom. Check out the website developed for the institute series.
  • Race, Power, and Identity in Cuba: Past and Present Primary Source Activities – In this activity-based curriculum, students utilize primary sources to explore how structural racism shaped experiences and identities of Afro-Cuban communities. This curriculum was inspired by Tulane University’s Summer 2017 Cuban Culture & Society K-12 Teacher Institute and created by the curriculum specialists at Primary Source. Adaptable for high school Spanish, Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts, and Art History.
  • Beyond the Book – A curriculum guide to Mayeros: A Yucatec Maya Family.
  • Día de los Muertos Across the Americas – This curriculum packet, an ongoing project, introduces Dí­a de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, in different parts of the Americas. The packet includes background information on various Day of the Dead traditions, classroom activities, and external resources. A great resource which can be used for a variety of grade levels.
  • Connecting New Orleans and Latin America – This curriculum introduces the longstanding connections between New Orleans and Latin America. The curriculum focuses on historic connections and the importance of trade and immigration to such issues.
  • Jewish Latin America – This workshop explored the diversity of the Latin American experience by looking at the impact of Jewish immigrants on the social, economic, political and, especially, the intellectual and cultural life of Latin America. Hosted at Tulane University on January 14, 2012.
  • Land of Diversity – A comprehensive high school social studies course on Latin America consisting of 19 units highlighting the history, geography, and culture of the region.
  • Malaika’s Costume – A Grade 3 curriculum based on the 2017 Américas Award Honorable Mention book Malaika’s Costume written by Nadia L. Hohn and illustrated by Irene Luxbacher (Simon and Schuster, 2016).
  • Los tres grandes – A complete lecture and slide show featuring the works of the Mexican Muralists: Rivera, Siqueros, and Orozco.
  • Yum! ¡Mmmm! ¡Que Rico! – A Grade 2-3 curriculum based on the Américas Award winning book, Yum! ¡Mmmm! ¡Que Rico!, written by Pat Mora and illustrated by Rafael López (New York: Lee & Low, 2007).

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Upcoming Events

Teaching and Understanding Women's Activism in the Face of Violence

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(Description via Vanderbilt CLAS)

Join Vanderbilt CLAS and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University for a teacher workshop about incorporating topics of social justice and gender equality in the curriculum. In 2019, Amalia Rubin and Parker Benedict joined forces to create She Stands Up, a project that aims to spark meaningful conversations in high school classrooms about the power of women’s activism in the face of violence. While the project’s lesson plans focus on social mobilization in Latin America, where reporting of violence against women has been steadily increasing in recent years, She Stands Up creators hope to inspire teachers and students alike to tackle relevant and difficult topics in the classroom. In this special workshop, Amalia and Parker will take us through the research behind the project, introduce us to their website (full of resources!), and lead us in an activity from one of their lesson plans. Current and aspiring high school educators are encouraged to attend, and all educators are welcome.

Data across the Disciplines: Notes from Field Research in Latin America

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This discussion will focus on how Latin Amercanist scholars use data in their research. Marcello Canuto (Tulane University) will present on the use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and other geospatial methods in his work in Maya archaeology. In a discussion moderated by Claudia Brittenham (University of Chicago), we will then discuss benefits and challenges, helpful tools, and various approaches to implementing new technologies into field research. This event workshop is for students in any field who are thinking about the possible uses of spatial imaging and other types of technology-collected data in their own research.

Marcello A. Canuto is Director of the Middle American Research Institute and Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University. He has undertaken archaeological excavations in the Maya region, South America, India, north Africa, and the northeast US. His primary research interest in the Maya area has been on the integrative mechanisms that the ancient Maya used to build and maintain a socio-politically complex society throughout both the Preclassic and Classic periods. He now co-directs a project in the understudied Northwest Peten, Guatemala where he investigates the construction of social categories and the mechanisms by which complex socio-political organizations develop and were maintained.

Claudia Brittenham is Interim Director of the Center for Latin American Studies and Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the art of ancient Mesoamerica, with particular attention to the ways that the materiality of art and the politics of style contribute to our understanding of the ontology of images. Her current book project, Unseen Art: Vision and Memory in Ancient Mesoamerica, explores problems of visibility and the status of images in Mesoamerica. Ranging from carvings on the undersides of Aztec sculptures to Maya lintels, and buried Olmec offerings, it examines the distance between ancient experiences of works of art and the modern practice of museum display.

Register in advance for this meeting with this link

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Sponsored by the Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Chicago, under the auspices of the Tinker Field Research Collaborative.

Download the pdf of the flyer here.

A Discussion of Obscuro Barroco: "Imaginaçoes de Carnaval"

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Join Drs. Ana López, João Luiz Vieira, Leslie Louise Marsh, and Catherine Benamou for a discussion of the documentary film Obscuro Barroco.

Obscuro Barroco is a documentary-fiction film about the dizzying heights of gender and metamorphosis in Rio de Janeiro. Following the path of iconic transgender figure Luana Muniz (1961-2017), the film explores the different quests for the self, through transvestism, carnival and political struggle. In turn, it asks questions about the desire for transformation of the body, both intimate and social.

The full film is available to watch here.

You can also watch the film, browse resources, and meet the panelists on the event webpage, here.
We encourage all attendees to watch the film prior to the event.

Special thanks to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the PORTulane community, the Department of Communication, and the Howard Tilton Memorial Library for co-sponsoring this project.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: K'iche' Language Learning

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The April 29th session will focus on K’iche’ language learning with guest speaker Nela Petronila Tahay Tzay. It will be facilitated by Ignacio Carvajal.

Global Read Webinar Series Spring 2021

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies coordinates the annual CLASP Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature and is excited to collaborate with other world area book awards on this exciting online program. Join us this spring 2021 as we invite award winning authors to join us in an online conversation about social justice, the writing process and an exploration of culture and identity across world regions. This annual Global Read Webinar series invites readers of all ages to join us as we explore books for the K-12 classroom recognized by world area book awards such as the Africana Book Award, the Américas Award, the Freeman Book Award, the Middle East Outreach Council Book Award, and the South Asia Book Award.

Each webinar features a presentation by an award-winning author with discussion on how to incorporate multicultural literature into the classroom. Be sure to join the conversation with our webinar hashtag #2021ReadingAcrossCultures.

REGISTER FOR THE SERIES HERE

SPRING 2021 SCHEDULE – Read more about the program here.
All webinars are at 7:00 PM EST.

  • January 12 – The Américas Award highlights the 2020 Honor Book, The Moon Within by Aida Salazar
  • February 3 – The Children’s Africana Book Award highlights the 2020 book award winning, Hector by Adrienne Wright
  • March 11 – The Middle East Outreach Award presents 2020 Picture Book award winner, Salma the Syrian Chef by Danny Ramadan, illustrated by Anna Bron
  • April – Freeman Book Award, a project of the National Consortium for Teaching Asia will present a book TBD.
  • May 13 – South Asia Book Award presents The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani

REGISTER FOR THE SERIES HERE

All sessions are free and open to the public. All times listed refer to Eastern Standard Time (EST). Sponsored by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, the South Asia National Outreach Consortium, the Middle East Outreach Council, and African Studies Outreach Council, The National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.

Reading Latina Voices Online Book Group for High School Educators

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This spring 2021 we invite all K-12 educators to join us once a month in an online book group. This past year has been a challenging one for everyone but especially K-12 educators. Sign up and join us as we explore the stories of women confronting identity as Latinas in the United States. Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, AfterCLASS and the New Orleans Public Library partner to host this online book group. The books selected are recognized by the Américas Award and focus on the Latina experience. The group begins with the work of award-winning author and poet, Elizabeth Acevedo who will speak in a unique online format on March 23rd presented by Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Newcomb Institute.

  • B) Free – you find your own copies of the books at your local library.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS JANUARY 29, 2021

Reading Schedule – Thursdays at 6:00 PM CST

  • February 11 – Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • March 18 – The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • April 15 – American Street by Ibi Zoboi
  • May 13 – The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

Sponsored by AfterCLASS and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the New Orleans Public Library.