Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Tulane University – New Orleans, LA
April 2009

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University held the Second Biennial Latin American Environmental Media Festival in New Orleans April 2009. This weekend-long festival brought to audiences films, videos, and innovative works in digital media whose subjects call critical attention to major environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. The festival was held on the Tulane University campus and at venues in the city. It screened a curated, non-competitive series of innovative works and new productions submitted as part of a juried competition. A distinguished jury awarded prizes in four categories at the opening of the festival in late March.

2009 Film Winners

  • Best Feature Length Documentary – Grissi Siknis: La enfermedad mágica de la selva_/ _Grissi Siknis: The magic illness of the jungle
    Enrique Ruiz-Skipey
    Mexico/Nicaragua/Spain, 2008

The jungle madness known as Grissi Siknis is a contagious, naturally bound syndrome that occurs among the Miskito of Eastern Central America and affects mainly young women. Grissi Siknis is typically characterized by long periods of anxiety, nausea, dizziness, irrational anger and fear interlaced with short periods of rapid frenzy in which the victims lose consciousness, and believe that devils beat them, have sexual relations with them, and run away. Traditional Miskito tradition holds that Grissi Siknis is caused by possession by evil spirits or inflicted by a malevolent evil sorcerer. While Western medicine typically has no effect on those affected with the disease, the remedies of Miskito herbalists or healers are often successful in curing the madness.

  • Best of the Fest – Justicia Now!
    Martin O’Brien and Robbie Proctor
    Ecuador, 2007
    Justicia Now! is a documentary about Chevron Texaco’s toxic legacy in the Northern Ecuadorian region of the Amazon rainforest – and a courageous group of people called Los Afectados (The Affected Ones) who are seeking justice for the ensuing cancer, sickness and death in the largest environmental class action lawsuit in history. Get more information here.

For more information, please contact Denise Wolterning at dwolteri@tulane.edu or 504-862-3143.

This event is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.

Spring 2004

LARC did not offer any film series for that semester, but instead offered several workshops.

Fall 2003

Environmental Justice and Human Rights in Latin America September 20, 2003, 9:00AM – 12:00PM

* This film series presented documentaries from the Lending Library that focused on issues of environmental justice and as they relate to human rights. It also looked at ways that globalization has effected the environment in Latin America and what repercussions it has had on indigenous groups.

Dia de los Muertos Saturday, October 11, 2003, 9:00AM – 12:00PM

* This professional development opportunity presented slides and films that showed Dia de los Muertos events throughout Mexico and feature materials available through the Lending Library. Participants of this workshop also were treated to an art lesson that taught teachers how to build Dia de los Muertos artifacts in their classroom.

Latin American Studies Film Series October 16, 7:00 PM and November 20, 7:00 PM
LARC sponsored two films as part of the Latin American Studies Film Series.

* Hidden in Plain Sight Directed by John Smihula. (U.S., 2002) Afetr the showing, there was a Q & A with the director himself. * The Harder They Come. (Jamaica, 1973)

Spring 2003

State Sponsored Violence and Civil Unrest in Latin American History-
The Shining Path Guerrilla Movement of Peru
Saturday, March 22, 2003, 9am-12pm
Latin America is recognized for its geographic diversity and cultural vibrancy. The region is also characterized by its repressive political regimes, human rights abuses, bloody civil wars, and violent revolutions. How can teachers address such histories without perpetuating stereotypes and simplifying the issues? How should educators approach these violent histories in the classroom? This series will screen the Peruvian film, La Boca del Lobo, and utilize Peru’s Shining Path as a case study for discussing these sorts of issues. Tulane PhD candidate Cynthia Garza will give a pre-screening introduction on the Shining Path and facilitate a discussion after the film. Curriculum materials will be provided.

Films:
La Boca del Lobo
Zapatistas: The Next Phase
Remarkable Images

Art, Identity, and the Mexican Revolution
Saturday, April 19, 2003, 9am-12pm
Art and the Mexican Revolution are an inseparable pair whose combination changed the face of the country. This workshop will present materials on the Revolution and the art that developed as a result. By studying artists like Diego Rivera, José David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Guadalupe Posada, and others, students will gain an understanding of how the art of a nation embodies the spirit of its people and can often create a momentum that changes the entire political structure. Films and slides from the Lending Library will be previewed. Dr. Robert Irwin will lead an opening discussion on art and identity. Curriculum materials will also be available.

Films:
Mexican Murals: A Revolution on the Walls
Diego Rivera: Art and Revolution
Jose Guadeloupe Posada
Siquieros

LARC Film Series Presents Film Maker Greg Berger
Friday, April 4, 2003, 7pm
Freeman Auditorium, Tulane University
This film presentation is free and open to the public.
Greg Berger will present his two latest films Atenco: Machete Rebellion and ¡Tierra sí, aviones No! Berger and fellow crew members are on a national speaking tour to raise awareness of the plight of Atenco’s farmers, who stand to lose 95% of their farmland if a new airport is built. Claiming to be the first non-violent struggle of the 21st century, the Machete Rebellion has so far stopped the governments plans to expropriate the land from the farmers of Atenco.

Fall 2002

LARC did not offer a film series this semester. However, we did make available the LAS Film Series Schedule to all educators interested in learning about new films in the LARC Lending Library.

Spring 2002

Mesoamerican Folkstory and Myth Tuesday, March 5, 4:00pm-7:30pm and Saturday, March 9, 9:00am-12:30pm

* The Popol Vuh: The Creation Myth of the Maya. Directed by University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1986). 60 min. * The Five Suns: A Sacred History of Mexico. Directed by University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1986). 60 min. * Chac: The Rain God. Directed by Rolando Klein (1970/2001). 95 min.

Life on the Street Tuesday, April 9, 4:00pm-7:00pm and
Saturday, April 13, 9:00am-12:00pm

* Los ninos abandonados: Colombia. Directed by Danny Lyons (1975). 63 min. * Wilbert: Street Kid in Nicaragua. Directed and Produced by Bent Erik Kroyer (1995). 16 min. * Slave Ship: Favelas of Rio de Janeiro. Produced by Latin American Video Archives (1994). 28 min. * Venezuela: Children of the Street. Produced by Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1990). 26 min. * Guest speakers on current conditions in Brazilian favelas and in the streets of Nicaragua

Caribbean Roots: Indigenous Survivors Tuesday, May 7, 4:00pm-7:00pm and Saturday, May 11, 9:00am-12:00pm

* Portrait of the Caribbean Part E: Worlds Apart. Produced by Ambrose Video (1992). 60 min. * Garifuna Journey. Leland Berger Productions (1999). 47 min. * Caribbean Eye: Indigenous Survivors. Banyan Limited (1992). 30 min. * Quest of the Carib Canoe. Think Tank/BBC Television. (2000). 50 min.

Summer 2001

This series explored the reality of religion, music, art and war. It began to understand the complexity of women and children, the African and the indigenous. Please contact us with feedback on these and other films.

Schedule

Caribbean Music and Dance Monday, June 18, 1:00-4:00pm

* Routes of Rhythm: From Spain and Africa. The Cinema Guild (1997). * Every Day Art. LAVA (1994). * Chutney in Yuh Soca. Filmmakers Library (1995). * Rhythms of Haiti. Organization of American States (ca. 1980). * More resources on Caribbean Music and Dance

Women in Latin America Thursday, June 21, 1:00-4:00pm

* Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Produced by Susana Munoz & Lourdes Portillo (ca. 1985). * Home is Struggle. Women Make Movies (1991). * Women of Latin America: Cuba and Guatemala. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * In Women’s Hands: The Changing Roles of Women. Annenburg CPB Collection (1993). * More resources on Women in Latin America

The Reality of War Monday, June 25, 1:00-4:00pm

* Father Roy: Inside the School of Assassins. Richter Productions (1997). * If the Mango Tree Could Speak: Children and War in Latin America. New Day Films (1993). * Lines of Blood. Directed by Brian Moser and Julia Ware (1991). * Women of Latin America: Guatemala. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * More resources on War in Latin America

Tradition and Revolution Through Art Thursday, June 28, 1:00-4:00pm

* Popol Vuh: The Creation Myth of the Maya. University of California Extension (1986). * Mexican Murals: A Revolution on the Walls. Ohio University (1977). * The Art of Haiti. Facets Video (1983). * Daughters of Ixchel: Maya Thread of Change. University of California Extension (1993). * More resources on Art in Latin America

Children Without a Childhood Monday, July 9, 1:00-4:00pm

* Zoned for Slavery: The Child Behind the Label. Crowing Rooster Arts (1996). * Mexico: Back Door to the Promised Land. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (2000). * Sweating for a T-Shirt. Global Exchange (2000). * More resources on Children in Latin America

The African Diaspora Thursday, July 12, 1:00-4:00pm

* Axe. LAVA (1988). * Garifuna Journey. Leland Berger Productions (1999). * Palenque Un Canto. Casimba Films (1992). * Black Atlantic: On the Orixas Route. Filmmakers Library (1999). * More resources on Afro-Latin America

Indigenous Latin America Monday, July 16, 1:00-4:00pm

* Amazon Journal. Directed by Geoffrey O’Connor (1996). * Women of Latin America: Ecuador. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * Rigoberta Menchu: Broken Silence. Films for the Humanities (1993). * More resources on Indigenous Latin America

The Diversity of Faith Thursday, July 19, 1:00-4:00pm

* Televangelism in Brazil. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1999). * Havana Nagila: The Jews in Cuba. Schnitzki & Stone Video (1995). * In Search of History: Voodoo Secrets. A&E Television Networks (1996). * More resources on Religion in Latin America

Fall 2001

This series presented voices from children, leaders of social movements, victims of torture, and players in Latin America’s increasingly globalized and always political economy. Please contact us with feedback on these and other films.

Schedule

Children Speak Saturday, September 29, 9:00am-12:00pm and Tuesday, October 2, 4:00-7:00pm

* Medellin Notebooks. Directed by Catalina Villar (1998). * Children Without a Childhood: Mexico, Back Door to the Promised Land. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (2000). * If the Mango Tree Could Speak: A Documentary About Children and War in Central America. Directed by Patricia Goudvis (1993). * More resources on Children in Latin America.

Torture, Rights and Revolution Tuesday, October 23, 4:00-7:00pm and Saturday, October 27, 9:00am-12:00pm **Please be advised, these films portray real life violence that may not be suitable for all audiences.

* Brazil: Report on Torture. Directed by Saul Landau and Haskell Wexler (1971). * Human Rights in Haiti. Produced by Isabelle Abric for United Nations/OAS (2000). * Speaking Out: Displaced Colombians Silent No More. U.S. Committee for Refugees (2000). * Remarkable Images: The Ecuadorean Indigenous-Military Uprising. Directed by Brian Selmeski (2000). * More resources on Violence and Social Movements in Latin America.

Changing Markets, International Connections Saturday, November 10, 9:00am-12:00pm and Tuesday, November 13, 4:00-7:00pm

* Rainforests: Proving Their Worth. Produced by Interlock Media Associates (1990). * La Esquina Caliente: The Hot Corner: US-Cuba Baseball. Directed by William O’Neill and Michael Skolnik (2000). * Daughters of Ixchel: Maya Thread of Change. University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1993). * Street Vendors: The Informal Majority. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1996). * More resources on Markets in Latin America.

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Upcoming Events

Lunch with LAGO featuring Ruben Luciano

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Join the Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) on Friday, 1/24 at 12pm for the latest installment of our bi-weekly lunch series. Ruben Luciano is a Ph.D. student in the Tulane University History department, specializing in modern Latin American (specifically, Dominican) history, the military under dictatorship, intersectionality, and gender. He also has two Master’s degrees in the Social Sciences and Health Communication. He’ll be speaking on his thesis project, entitled “Queering the Trujillato: Reinterpretations of Loyalty, Criminality, and Homosociality in the Dominican Military from 1930-61.” Afterwards, we’ll open the floor for a Q & A, allowing for further conversation about Ruben’s work, more practical questions about the dissertation research and writing experience, and navigating the grants application process as a Ph.D. student.

The Labyrinth will be serving mini paninis, bagels, savory spreads and dips, desserts (including tres leches cake) and fresh juices. Please come hungry!

Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

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Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

This collaborative workshop is designed for middle to high school Social Studies educators to enhance the teaching of the Tunica community while highlighting this group as part of a series of ancient civilizations currently taught at the K-12 level. This workshop is the first one in the series aimed at increasing and extending the current teaching of ancient civilizations in the Americas. The local focus on Louisiana indigenous people and culture will enable educators to create deeper connections when teaching about indigenous identity across the Americas such as the Maya, the Aztec and the Inca.

This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Language Instructors Donna Pierite and Elisabeth Pierite Mora of the Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture Revitalization Program (LCRP) will share the history of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe beginning in 1541 up to the 1700s when the tribes reached the Avoyelles Prairie. Through story, song and dance they will share the Tunica language and Tunica-Biloxi culture. They will highlight the cultural educational initiatives of LCRP, and provide a list of online resources and samples of pedagogical materials for attendees.

Sponsored by the Middle American Research Institute, S.S. NOLA, and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Bate Papo! Primavera 2020

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A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome! Meetings take place on Fridays at different hours and locations. See the full schedule below:

January 17th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de maracuja

January 24th, 3 PM, Boot
Treat: Suco de caju

January 31st, 4PM, Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St.)
Treat: Suco de caja

February 7th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Agua de coco

February 14th, 11 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Guarana

February 21st, 12PM, PJs Willow
Treat: Cha de maracuja

February 28th, 2PM, Sharp Residence Hall
Treat: Cafe brasiliero

March 6th, 10 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Cha matte

March 13th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de goiaba

March 20th, 3 PM, Greenbaum House
Treat: Limonada a brasiliera

March 27th, 12 PM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Batido de abacate

April 3rd, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de acai

April 17th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Caldo de cana

April 24th, 2 PM, Boot
Treat: Groselha

Graduate Student Writing Group

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The Graduate Student Writing Group convenes on Fridays from 1:30 – 3:30 PM. These structured writing sessions are open to Latin Americanist graduate students in all departments. Students, who arrive with a project and a goal, work in communal silence during two 45 minute blocks separated by a 10-minute coffee break. All meetings will be held in the Latin American Library Seminar Room. Co-sponsored by the Stone Center and the Latin American Library.

Ancient Civilizations K-16 Series for Social Studies Educators

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Ancient Civilizations
K-16 Educator Workshop Series
Spring 2020

For educators of grade levels: K-12

Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute (MARI), Stone Center for Latin American Studies (SCLAS), S.S. NOLA, and AfterCLASS will host a professional development workshop series open to all K-16 school professionals. These workshops will challenge educators to learn about the unexpected impact and connections of Ancient civilizations from Central America to the Gulf South. In particular, the workshops will foster a deeper comprehension of how to incorporate art, language and food across the disciplines. Participants will learn unique ways to incorporate the Tunica, Maya and Aztec cultures into the classroom in a variety of subjects. Registration for each workshop is $5 and includes light snacks, teaching resources, and a certificate of completion.

The workshop series will prepare teachers:

  • To utilize digital humanities resources in the classroom;
  • To design culturally appropriate primary and secondary research projects;
  • To teach about Pre-Columbian and ancient civilizations, language, geography and foods;
  • To encourage student self-determination through meaningful and relevant cultural projects.

Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Tunica of the Lower Mississippi River Valley
Middle American Research Institute – Seminar Room
6823 St. Charles Avenue
This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Participants will explore the physical, cultural and linguistic characteristics of the region. Representatives of the Tunica community will introduce their language and culture and the work they do to preserve their language.

Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Understanding Maya Fare: Beyond Tamales and Cacao
AfterCLASS – Taylor Education Center
612 Andrew Higgins Blvd. #4003
In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from chocolate specialists and our Kaqchikel language scholar will discuss the importance of corn. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, May 2020
Aztec Mexican Art and Culture
Participants in this workshop will explore the art and culture of the Aztec community. Date TBD

Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A K-12 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 15, 2020
Cost: $3580

Now, in its fifth year, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University are proud to announce the return of our annual two-week summer educator institute exploring the geography, culture and history of Cuba. For an educator, Cuba is rich with lessons to bring into the classroom. This program highlights the important historical and cultural connections between the United States and Cuba. Participants will explore key sites and meet local experts and artists who will provide unique insight for educators who teach such subjects as U.S./Latin American Relations, World Geography, World History, and Spanish among others. Come and visit the site of the historic Bay of Pigs, explore Milton Hershey’s sugar plantation and the Cuban national literacy campaign.

Fill out the online APPLICATION here, due March 15, 2020.

Additional materials needed:
  • Two letters of recommendation (please make sure to have at least one recommendation letter from a colleague at your school) Please email your recommenders the PDF above. They submit via email the complete recommendation letter.
  • Copy of Passport
  • $200 program deposit

THE PROGRAM INCLUDES:

  • Lodging at Casa Vera (double occupancy)
  • At least 1 meal a day (at Casa Vera and on excursions)
  • Transportation to/from airport to residence (if you arrive on time)
  • Medical insurance: Each participant will be covered for the entire program length by a travel health insurance policy.
  • Group tours and excursions, with associated transportation

THE PROGRAM DOES NOT INCLUDE:

  • Airfare to/from the U.S.: approx. $300-$600
  • Visa: $50-$100 depending on airline
  • Checked luggage ($25) + Overweight baggage: This constitutes anything in excess of maximum allowed luggage weight (50lbs), both going and returning from Cuba.
  • Communication: Internet and long distance/international calls
  • Additional meals (1 a day, snacks)
  • Taxi/ground transportation: Participants are responsible for expenses incurred getting around town during free time.
  • Admission to museums, events, etc.: Participants will be responsible for these expenses unless they are part of itinerary.
  • All materials and personal expenditures
  • Loss/Theft Travel Insurance: Please note only travel medical insurance is included in program. If you would like additional coverage (including insurance for loss of baggage, emergency cash transfers, etc.), it is recommended that you purchase additional insurance.

APPLICATION

Please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164 for additional details.

Preview the Itinerary here