Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Spring 2003

Culture Clash: Indigenous Groups meet the Modern World
Thursday, March 20, 2003
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Today indigenous cultures make up the majority of the populations in a number of Latin American countries, with many of these groups still occupying their original lands. With modern society rapidly approaching these native “territories”, indigenous populations throughout Latin America and the world, are being forced into submission by powerful governments and even more powerful multi-national corporations. Through struggles over land, water, and minerals, indigenous groups are now being pushed out of their ancestral lands by governments and corporations seeking to monopolize their often rich natural resources.

In this workshop we will discuss definitions of culture, how it is being preserved, and why it is important; define the term indigenous; give numerous examples of indigenous populations; focus on ways to use indigenous groups as case studies in order to address a variety of content standards. We will also look at teaching materials available to educators who wish to teach about indigenous groups and the many problems these groups are encountering.

This workshop is ideal for teachers of the following courses:
History
Economics
Science
World Geography

Objectives and outcomes to assist educators in:
  • Develop concern for indigenous issues.
  • Discuss the many definitions of culture and indigenous.
  • Introduce educators to problems facing indigenous groups as a result of globalization.
  • Learn how to incorporate indigenous groups and issues into the classroom.
  • Discuss methods of how to use case studies to promote academic enrichment.

What is the purpose of teaching about indigenous groups?

  • Students will gain an understanding of what culture means and how it can be interpreted.
  • Students will be able to define indigenous groups
  • Students will use an indigenous group as a case study for meeting economic and history standards.

How Louisiana Social Studies content standards will be met:

  • 1. Who is indigenous? What is culture? G-1B-E2 – identifying and describing the human characteristics of places, including population distributions and culture; H-1C-M1 – describing the earliest human communities.
  • 2. Where do indigenous people live? G-1C-E3 – describing and explaining the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations; G-1C-E4 – identifying and comparing the cultural characteristics of different regions and people.
  • 3. These groups are under constant threat from the state who are seeking control of their land and natural resources. G-1D-E4 – describing the use, distribution, and importance of natural resources; G-1C-M3 – describing the characteristics and patterns of human settlement in different regions of the world and analyzing the impact of urbanization; G-1D-H3 – analyzing the relationship between natural resources and the exploration, colonization, settlement, and uses of land in different regions of the world.
  • 4. How does location influence culture? G-1B-H4 – explaining and evaluating the importance of places and regions to cultural identity; G-1D-H4 – evaluating policies and programs related to the use of natural resources.
  • 5. How did colonialization effect indigenous peoples? How has globalization affected them? What were some of the major drive forces between the conquest of the new world? H-1A-M5 – identifying issues and problems from the past and evaluating alternative courses of action; H-1B-M5 – analyzing the impact of European cultural, political, and economic ideas and institutions on life in the Americas; H-1A-H6 – analyzing cause-effect relationships; H-1B-H1 – analyzing the significant changes that resulted from interactions among the peoples of Europe, Africa, and the Americas; E-1A-E1 – recognizing that limited resources require people to make decisions; E-1A-M1 – describing how the scarcity of resources necessitates decision making at both personal and societal levels; E-1A-M9 – using economic concepts to help explain historic and contemporary events and developments; E-1B-H4 – analyzing the causes and consequences of worldwide economic interdependence.

Latin American Identity through Music
Spotlight: Afro-Peruvian Music
Thursday, April 24, 2003
1:00 – 4:00 PM

For any musical innovation is full of danger to the whole State, and ought to be prohibited. So Damon tells me, and I can quite believe him; he says that when modes of music change, the fundamental laws of the State always change with them”.
—Plato, The Republic, Book IV

In the face of political repression and discrimination, Latin American cultural groups have often found a voice through music. During the 1960s, the New Song developed in Latin America, which was a combination of traditional folk music and socially relevant lyrics. In countries like Chile and Argentina, this form of social protest was banned leaving many of the artists to be forced into exile. In this workshop, Tulane ethnomusicology professor Javier León, will lead a discussion on ways to use music in a k12 classroom in order to teach about the history, culture, and traditions of Latin America.

This workshop is suitable for:
Foreign Language
Social Studies
Language Arts
Music

Objectives and Outcomes:
  • Discuss ways to use music to teach history, culture, and tradition.
  • Develop methods of incorporating Gardner’s Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal/Social Intelligences.
  • To teach students how to extract information from such common means of expression as music, story telling, and dance.
  • Discuss ways in which music has served as a vehicle for social mobilization and protest.
  • Discuss stylistic differences between different types of music in a particular country that can be used as a way of highlighting ethnic and cultural differences within that nation.
  • Tracing the musical development of a particular genre of music over several decades can serve as a good foreground with which to discuss the broader social history of a particular country.

This workshop will focus on many of the Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills:

  • 1. Communication: A process by which information is exchanged and a concept of “meaning” is created and shared between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently, strategically, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing.
  • 2. Resource Access and Utilization: The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technologies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies.
  • 3. Linking and Generating Knowledge: The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In [Order] to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transfer and elaborate on these processes. “Transfer” refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. “Elaboration” refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts.

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Bate Papo! Primavera 2020--NOW ONLINE!

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Bate Papo will now be held virtually! Join the conversation!

A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome! Meetings take place on Fridays at different hours and locations. See the full schedule below:

January 17th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de maracuja

January 24th, 3 PM, Boot
Treat: Suco de caju

January 31st, 4PM, Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St.)
Treat: Suco de caja

February 7th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Agua de coco

February 14th, 11 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Guarana

February 21st, 12PM, PJs Willow
Treat: Cha de maracuja

February 28th, 2PM, Sharp Residence Hall
Treat: Cafe brasiliero

March 6th, 9:30 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Cha matte

March 13th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de goiaba

March 20th, 3 PM, Greenbaum House
Treat: Limonada a brasiliera

March 27th, 12 PM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Batido de abacate

April 3rd, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de acai

April 17th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Caldo de cana

April 24th, 2 PM, Boot
Treat: Groselha

Teaching Aztec History through Art: Online K-12 Webinar

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Join us for the final webinar in the series on Ancient Civilizations. This workshop has moved online and will consist of a 60 minute online webinar that includes an introduction to teaching Aztec history, a discussion of different art objects that the Aztecs created which reveal insights into their history, and a discussion of new online resources to incorporate into your teaching.

The webinar is free an open to educators of all grade levels. In order to access the session, please register here.

Please email dwolteri@tulane.edu for more information.

Co-sponsored by S.S.NOLA.

Pebbles Center Launches Virtual La hora del cuento/Story Time

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Join us every Thursday at 3 PM CST for a live reading of books in Spanish from the Pebbles collection. Books from this collection share stories of Latin America, the Caribbean and the Latinx community in the U.S. The Pebbles collection is a collaborative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library. Author and educator, Andrea Olatunji shares the latest top Spanish language picture books. Originally scheduled to share her work at the Tulane Book Festival (cancelled due to COVID-19), she is now jumping online to help young readers explore Latin America in Spanish from home. Check out her work www.cuentacuento.com to learn more.

Make sure to ‘like’ The Pebbles Center on Facebook to receive updates. This program takes place live on this Facebook page.

Ancient Civilizations K-16 Series for Social Studies Educators

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Ancient Civilizations
K-16 Educator Workshop Series
Spring 2020

For educators of grade levels: K-12

Tulane University’s Middle American Research Institute (MARI), Stone Center for Latin American Studies (SCLAS), S.S. NOLA, and AfterCLASS will host a professional development workshop series open to all K-16 school professionals. These workshops will challenge educators to learn about the unexpected impact and connections of Ancient civilizations from Central America to the Gulf South. In particular, the workshops will foster a deeper comprehension of how to incorporate art, language and food across the disciplines. Participants will learn unique ways to incorporate the Tunica, Maya and Aztec cultures into the classroom in a variety of subjects. Registration for each workshop is $5 and includes light snacks, teaching resources, and a certificate of completion.

The workshop series will prepare teachers:

  • To utilize digital humanities resources in the classroom;
  • To design culturally appropriate primary and secondary research projects;
  • To teach about Pre-Columbian and ancient civilizations, language, geography and foods;
  • To encourage student self-determination through meaningful and relevant cultural projects.

Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Tunica of the Lower Mississippi River Valley
Middle American Research Institute – Seminar Room
6823 St. Charles Avenue
This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Participants will explore the physical, cultural and linguistic characteristics of the region. Representatives of the Tunica community will introduce their language and culture and the work they do to preserve their language.

Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Understanding Maya Fare: Beyond Tamales and Cacao
AfterCLASS – Taylor Education Center
612 Andrew Higgins Blvd. #4003
In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from chocolate specialists and our Kaqchikel language scholar will discuss the importance of corn. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, APRIL 29, 2020
Aztec Mexican Art and Culture
Participants in this workshop will explore the art and culture of the Aztec community.