Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Grants & Funding


Students accepted into the M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Latin American Studies are eligible for two types of aid: Tulane School of Liberal Arts University Fellowships and U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Study (FLAS) Fellowships. Although the amount of financial aid and the general policies and procedures for students holding these fellowships are the similar, there are fundamental differences.

Graduate School Fellowships
School of Liberal Arts University Fellowships provide a fellowship stipend and a tuition waiver. As a condition of this funding, each fellow must provide either service or teaching for the Stone Center. M.A. Students must serve for 6 hours per week as a Research and Project Associate and Ph.D. Candidates must either serve as a Teaching Assistant or as a Research and Project Associate.

FLAS Fellowships
With funding for the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies is able to offer a special fellowship program to a select group of students. The goals of the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship program include: assisting in the development of knowledge, resources, and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area/international studies; stimulating the attainment of foreign language acquisition and fluency; and developing a pool of international experts to meet national needs. FLAS fellowships are available to those graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and are in need of attaining language proficiency in Portuguese, Haitian Creole, or an indigenous Latin American language. There are awards available for both the academic year and for summer intensive language study.

Academic year FLAS fellowships may be awarded to those Tulane University graduate students in Latin American Studies, Humanities, Social Sciences, or professional school programs whose program of study requires Portuguese or Haitian Creole. Benefits of an academic year FLAS fellowship include: a service-free fellowship stipend and a tuition waiver provided by the School of Liberal Arts. Only students enrolling in a graduate program within the School of Liberal Arts are eligible for the tuition waiver. Those students receiving a FLAS fellowship during the academic year must register for their required language course (most often Portuguese) over and above the normal course load of nine hours. Priority for funding of academic year FLAS fellowships goes to those students who demonstrate a need for proficiency in Portuguese or Haitian Creole. However the regular graduate application serves also as the FLAS application. There is no separate form or application for consideration of an academic year FLAS fellowship. Prospective graduate students interested in an academic year FLAS fellowship and who are applying to programs other than the Latin American Studies graduate program must request from the relevant school or program to which they are applying that their admissions application packet/materials be copied and forwarded to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for FLAS fellowship consideration. The deadline for submitting these materials is Feb. 1 for fellowship consideration for the subsequent academic year. All prospective FLAS fellowship applicants should indicate in their graduate application statement of purpose the nature of their interest in and need for the study of either Portuguese or Haitian Creole and how the study of these languages will serve their future post-graduate career objectives.

Summer FLAS fellowships are administered separately from the academic year FLAS program and follow the guidelines and application process outlined below. Please consult the section on Summer FLAS fellowships below for more information.

Latin American Studies Graduate Student Conference Paper Presentation Travel Support
This program is exclusively for Latin American Studies graduate students at Tulane University. This program requires the actual presentation of a research paper at a recognized professional academic conference. It is intended to help offset some of the costs of travel to present at such a conference. It does not support simple conference attendance, nor does it support conference participation in any other capacity, nor does it support participation in specialized workshops, working groups, symposia, or seminars. Requests for funding must be made at least one month prior to the conference. Students are limited to no more than two conference travel grants per Academic Year. Applications will be considered on a first-come, first-serve basis for as long as funds are available. NOTE: Given the limited funding we have available for this program, and given that there are other sources of conference travel funding available on campus, students must apply to other sources of funding on campus first before applying to the Stone Center, and should indicate application to these other sources of funding on their application to the Stone Center. To apply for funding through this Stone Center program, please complete the Conference Travel Support Application Form. Applicants can choose only one funding category between the following three options: (1) 1/2 the cost of airfare; (2) a 2-day per diem rate as calculated by the U.S. Government; or (3) conference registration.
IMPORTANT NOTE ON PER DIEM AWARDS: Per diem rates are usually a combination of separate rates for lodging and meals/incidentals, with a fixed amount allocated for lodging and another for meals/incidentals. The lodging portion of per diem rates will only be reimbursed up to, but not exceeding, either the actual costs of the lodging, or the per diem rate, whichever is lower. Please keep in mind that you will not be reimbursed the full per diem rate if the actual expense for your lodging is below the per diem rate for lodging. Likewise, the per diem amount for meals/incidentals is also fixed and may be used only for expenses related to the individual applicant. Reimbursement for meals/incidental expenses for other individuals is not permitted. All receipts for meals/incidental expenses must be submitted when the reimbursement request is made. The meals/incidentals portion of per diem rates will only be reimbursed up to, but not exceeding, either the actual costs of meals/incidental expenses, or the per diem rate, whichever is lower. Please keep in mind that you will not be reimbursed the full per diem rate if your actual meals/incidentals expenses are lower than the corresponding per diem rate. Meals are reimbursable, alcoholic drinks are not. Incidental expenses are non-meal expenses related directly to the costs of travel such as ground transport fares, tolls, etc. Conference registration is not an incidental expense related to the costs of travel and cannot be applied against the meals/incidental per diem award. Finally, the per diem award is not a guaranteed fixed amount that can be used to cover expenses beyond two days. The allocation is restricted to eligible expenses for two days. For instance, if your two-day per diem award is for $400 ($200 per day), and your actual eligible per diem expenses are $100 per day, then you are only eligible to receive $200 of the $400 award, even if your travel extends over a 4 day period. You cannot apply the $200 difference to cover expenses for the 3rd and 4th days. Please consult with us if you are driving, staying with a friend, or if there are any other special circumstances.


Stone Center and Tinker Foundation Summer Field Research Grants
Application Deadline: March 16, 2018

Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2007
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2008
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2009
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2010
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2011
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2012
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2013
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2014
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2015
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2016

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies invites all Tulane University graduate students engaged in the study of Latin America or the Caribbean to apply for funding to conduct field research outside of the United States during the summer of 2018. Funding is provided partly through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and partly through the Tinker Foundation. These field research grants are not to be used for dissertation research, but rather to provide graduate students who have little to no field research experience with an opportunity to explore the feasibility of a particular field research project and to gain experience in conducting preliminary hands-on field research abroad.

For a successful grant proposal in the field of Public Health, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Natural/Biological Sciences, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Humanities, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Social Sciences, click here.

A complete application packet, which should be submitted electronically by email attachment according to the program eligibility and application guidelines, must include three documents:

Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) 2018 Summer Field Course Grant Program: The Stone Center sponsors only one graduate student each summer to participate in an OTS Summer Field Course in Costa Rica. Information on available OTS Summer Field Courses can be obtained at the OTS Graduate Programs website. Only OTS programs offered over the Summer (May-August) are eligible for funding consideration. This opportunity is open to any Tulane graduate student.

A complete application packet, which should be submitted electronically by email attachment and must include three documents:

The submission deadline for the OTS Summer Field Course Grant Application is March 16, 2018.

FLAS Summer Fellowships
Application Deadline: February 16, 2018

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies receives funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program for Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. Part of the FLAS fellowships administered by the Stone Center are available to graduate students for the intensive study over the summer of Kaqchikel Maya, Portuguese, or another less-commonly taught Latin American language. Graduate students wishing to engage in intensive study of such a language are encouraged to apply for one of these fellowships. Only U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply; and only intensive summer language programs approved by the U.S. Department of Education are eligible under this program. A listing of some of the approved programs is prepared by CLASP and available on-line. Program information and application packets for Tulane sponsored summer language programs can be found here. Our Summer FLAS FAQ attempts to answer questions about the FLAS Summer Fellowships for graduate students. The guidelines [.doc version] of this program are very specific, please read them carefully before applying.

For additional guidance, view the recording of the FLAS Summer Fellowship Webinar held on February 2, 2017 (click on the link). You can also download the accompanying PowerPoint in PDF form here: Summer FLAS Webinar February 2, 2017 Presentation

A complete application packet must include FOUR documents:

All application materials should be submitted electronically by email attachment according to the guidelines in the application and faculty recommendation forms. Please review these guidelines carefully.

For questions regarding the FLAS Fellowship, please contact Dr. Jimmy Huck by email at




All Events

Upcoming Events

Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture

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Join Dr. Emily Greenwood as she will be speaking about Greek language/literature, slavery, and the “politics of the human” when she delivers the Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture.

Emily Greenwood is Professor and Chair of the Classics Department at Yale University where she also holds a joint appointment in African American Studies. She is one of the pre-eminent thinkers on Greek historiography of her generation as well as the leading figure in re-evaluating the legacy of Graeco-Roman culture in colonial and post-colonial contexts. In addition to her book Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford 2010) [Joint winner of the Runciman Prize], she has published over a dozen articles and book chapters that investigate the rich and nuanced reception of ancient Greek literature in the African Diaspora, especially in Caribbean literature.

Africana Studies Brown Bag Lecture with Prof. Dan Sharp

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Naná Vasconcelos: Afro-Brazilian Percussion in Paris and New York City

Dan Sharp is currently conducting research for a book that revolves around the 1980 album Saudades by Afro-Brazilian Naná Vasconcelos. The book will situate Naná‘s reimagining of percussion and voice in the context of his itinerant life in New York, Europe and Brazil in the 1970s and 1980s. Snacks provided!

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

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What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

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Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

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Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

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Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English