Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs


Tulane’s Undergraduate Latin American Studies Organization (TULASO) was founded to bring together undergraduates who share an interest in Latin America, ranging from career opportunities to cultural experiences to academic study. It is an independent student organization that collaborates with the Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Graduate Organization (LAGO), faculty members and other entities to sponsor academic, service and social activities related to Latin America. All Tulane students interested in Latin American affairs are invited to join TULASO, but the organization draws heavily on student majors and minors in Latin American Studies. Officers for the organization are elected in the Spring semester and working committees are formed in the Fall semester.

TULASO sponsors two live music events each semester, often in collaboration with other undergraduate student groups. These Pachangas en el Patio feature local and international musicians who perform a variety of music from Latin America and the Caribbean. The entire Tulane community is invited to attend. Check the Stone Center’s Events page for upcoming activities.

TULASO activities are decided by the organization’s members. Past activities range from salsa dancing at local clubs, to excursions to Latino restaurants and bakeries, to volunteer work and charity fundraisers, to world-cup football viewing, to workshops geared toward preparing students for future career and academic work, to a weekend trip to the School of the Americas protest and teach-in at Ft. Benning, GA.

For information or suggestions regarding TULASO, contact the 2012-2013 Student Executive Committee:

  • Chair of Administration: Alexa Schwartz
  • Chair of Finance: Abigail Sebton
  • Chair of Community Service: Haley Ade

Model Organization of American States, Washington D.C.
Each spring the Stone Center sends a Tulane delegation to the Washington Model of the Organization of American States, a five-day simulation of the OAS General Assembly held annually in Washington D.C., designed to introduce participants to the structures and processes of the OAS itself, to familiarize students with topical issues facing the hemisphere and a Member State of the OAS, and to teach the art of international diplomacy. Universities from throughout the United States and Latin America participate at the Model each year. Tulane’s WMOAS is run as a club in fall and as a class (LAST 4960) in spring. Students must participate in the club to be eligible to apply to be a delegate and participate in class.

This unique collaboration allows students unprecedented access to the OAS and its member state missions. The opening and closing ceremonies are held at the Hall of the Americas at OAS Headquarters; these sessions are attended by ambassadors and the OAS Secretary General. Committee sessions are held at the Fairmont Hotel near Georgetown. The WMOAS faculty works closely with the OAS Department of External Relations to offer a realistic, academically challenging, and unique opportunity for students to learn about the OAS and its mission, its member states, and the important issues that face the Hemisphere.

Latin American Studies Student Conferences
The Stone Center’s annual TUCLA conference is an interdisciplinary undergraduate symposium in which seniors from the Latin American Studies core seminar present their individual research projects. TUCLA was formally launched in Fall of 2003 as a means to provide Latin American Studies undergraduates with an opportunity to present papers in the style and atmosphere of an academic conference. The conference is designed to enlist all of Tulane’s LAST seniors in a shared discussion of the region, its society and its cultures. Although participation is restricted to seniors in the core seminar, Tulane students in other majors, Latin American Studies students at all levels, professors and friends and family are encouraged to attend to support the presenters and get a feel for character and quality of our undergraduate program and students.

In addition, the Stone Center provides workshops and advice on writing abstracts, grant proposals and on presenting research at other conferences. Our undergraduate students have presented their core seminar research at The University of Texas at Austin’s Annual ILASSA Student Conference, generally held in February. This student run conference on Latin America is the oldest of its kind. Undergraduate and graduate students from across the U.S. and Latin America present their research on a wide range of critical topics, including immigration, human rights, social movements, indigenous rights, and social policy. It provides an opportunity to present research activities, develop presentation skills, exchange ideas and information, and meet other scholars from around the world. The call for papers is circulated in early fall, which we forward to all of our undergraduate list-serve. Research conducted for any class on Latin America (not just LAST 4000) can be submitted for the conference.

Each year as a group organized through the Stone Center in coordination with TULASO, Latin American Studies Students attend the Birmingham-Southern College Annual Latin American Studies Symposium, generally held in mid-April. The largest undergraduate conference on Latin America in the country, this inter- and multi-disciplinary event offers a unique opportunity for undergraduate students get to present their research, get to know other Tulane LAST majors and begin to accrue scholarly experience. The call for papers is circulated at the end of the fall semester. Research conducted for any class on Latin America (not just LAST 4000) can be submitted for the conference




All Events

Upcoming Events

Lecture with Rafael Ledezma, Greenleaf Fellow

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk titled, “Nueva cronología del modelo primario-exportador de Honduras, 1880-1930/A New Chronology of the Primary Commodity Exports Model in Honduras, 1880-1930” by Rafael Ledezma, the 2017-2018 Richard E. Greenleaf Fellow at the Latin American Library.

The talk will be in SPANISH. All are invited for refreshments afterwards.

Las explicaciones convencionales sobre la historia política y económica de Honduras sostuvieron que, entre 1880 y 1930, el país fue un simple exportador de banano, y que su economía nacional no se benefició de este sector porque fue controlado por empresas extranjeras (United Fruit Co, Cuyamel Fruit Co y Standard Fruit Co). No sorprende, por lo tanto, que a Honduras se le haya conocido como la “banana republic” por excelencia. En esta ponencia presentaré, como hipótesis, una nueva cronología de la historia hondureña de ese periodo, que consiste en tres fases que definieron modos distintos de vinculación al mercado internacional, y que van más allá de la comercialización del banano. Ahondaré en aspectos tales como la actividad marítima y portuaria, con cuáles otros países, además de Estados Unidos, tuvo relaciones comerciales, y cuáles productos vendió y compró del exterior. Se seleccionó este periodo porque, recientemente, la historia económica en América Latina lo está estudiando desde distintos enfoques, para así aportar nuevas visiones sobre los problemas del desarrollo económico en el largo plazo, y los orígenes históricos de la desigualdad social en la región.

Conventional explanations of the political and economic history of Honduras held that, between 1880 and 1930, the country only exported bananas, and that its national economy did not benefit from this sector because it was controlled by foreign companies (United Fruit Co, Cuyamel Fruit Co y Standard Fruit Co). It is therefore not surprising that Honduras has come to be known as the “banana republic” par excellence. In my talk, I will present as a hypothesis a new chronology of Honduran history of this period consisting of three phases that defined different modes of linkages to international markets and that go beyond the commercialization of bananas. I will examine issues such as maritime and port activity; the countries besides the United States with which Honduras had commercial ties; and the products that were bought and sold abroad. I chose to focus on this period because the economic history of Latin America has recently begun to be studied from new perspectives that have refocused our understanding of long-term economic development and the historical origins of social inequality in the region.

Rafael Ledezma hails from Costa Rica. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica (2006); a Master’s degree in Applied History from El Colegio de México (2016); and is currently a PhD candidate in History from that university. His research and publications focus on the history of agriculture and the environment in 20th century Costa Rica, and the economic history of Honduras between 1880-1930.

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

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Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Office of Multicultural Affairs: International Food and Music Festival

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The International Food and Music Festival is a tradition for Tulane University and the surrounding New Orleans community. It is not possible without the participation of the international community at Tulane. We need your help to represent your culture, country, or community. Share food, crafts, cultural history, language, performance, and have fun at this beautiful outdoor festival.

This event is FREE for all Tulane faculty, staff and students. You must present your Splash Card. Non-affiliated Tulane attendees can purchase tickets here.

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here for more information and registration.

If you have questions, email or

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pave

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Bate Papo! End your Friday afternoon on the Jones Hall patio with a classic Brazilian layer dessert. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at