Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Cuba (Havana) Cuban Culture and Society

Since 1997, Tulane’s Summer in Cuba program has offered undergraduate students a unique opportunity for an in-depth learning experience in our closest Caribbean neighbor. Based in Havana, Cuba’s vibrant capital and the cultural and economic center of the island, the program provides participants with accommodations in the heart of the city – offering many opportunities for language and cultural immersion outside the classroom. Classes are hosted by the University of Havana, an internationally prestigious Cuban academic institution. Course offerings include: Afro-Cuban Heritage: History and Culture, Cuban Culture and Society, Urban Landscape: Imagining Havana, Spanish, and Cuban Literature. With the exception of Spanish language studies and the Cuban Literature course, all classes are taught in English unless otherwise noted and are complemented by readings and field trips. This program is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. This program has been discontinued as of June 30, 2004. For information on current programs in Cuba, visit the Cuban and Caribbean Studies website.

Cuba (Havana) International Public Health

This summer program is open to graduate students seeking on-site experience with public health issues in developing countries. The course will expose students to multiple aspects of the Cuban health system. It will take place in the unique social and political environment of Havana, and involve daily lectures by various health authorities in the country, and several visits to important sites relevant to the health system. It will challenge students to critically evaluate current issues in Cuban development that affect its population’s health status. In addition, students will gain an applied understanding of the current methods used to measure social change within Cuba. This program has been discontinued as of June 30, 2004. For information on the current Public Health in Cuba program, visit the web page.

Dominican Republic

The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are pleased to offer students the opportunity to study in the Dominican Republic during a three-week summer program. Participating students will have a unique opportunity to observe and study the history, culture, social structures, institutions, and landscape (built and natural) of the Dominican Republic in the context of the Caribbean. Guest lectures by local specialists in conjunction with extensive field trips throughout the country will enhance the two courses offered, Dominican Culture and Society in a Caribbean Context and Urban Forms and Vernacular Landscapes in the Caribbean. Classes will be held in different locations throughout the Dominican Republic and students will be housed in hotels throughout the island. Associate Provost Ana López, who is also the director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute, will lead the program. A faculty member of the LAS Communication department, Prof. López’s research focuses on Latin American and Caribbean film and popular culture. The co-director of the program is Prof. Mark Thomas, who teaches historical preservation and landscape architecture in the Tulane School of Architecture. This program has been discontinued as of 2008. For current opportunities in the Dominican Republic, please visit the Academic/Semester Year Programs page.

Peru (Norte Chico Region) Archaeology and Cultural History
Through Tulane’s Archaeological Program in Peru, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies offers students the opportunity to study in the Norte Chico region of Peru, an area that has gained recent fame for its prehistoric complexity and late Chimu occupation. The recent discovery of early evidence of social complexity in the region, dating to approximately 2900 years ago, makes this an ideal time for students to explore this prehistoric culture . El Norte Chico region is located 200 kilometers north of Lima, the nation’s capital, and is famous not only for its early monumental architecture, but also for its impressive Chimu occupation that includes large walled fortresses. As part of this archaeological field school, students will be exposed to the prehistoric Peruvian cultures that once occupied this area and will be taught archaeological field survey methods and analysis techniques. Kit Nelson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University and a specialist in the late Pre-ceramic and Early Initial Period of Peru, leads the program. This program has been discontinued as of 2008. For current opportunities in Peru, please visit the Academic/Semester Year Programs page.

Summer in Chile
The Stone Center for Latin American Studies invites students interested in issues on Latin American development, economy, and society to participate in this exciting opportunity in the Southern Cone. The program is based out of Valparaíso, Chile, the country’s most important port city, located in the Fifth Region on the coast due west of the capital city of Santiago. Valparaíso is linked by rail, road, and seawall to the city of Viña del Mar, an important tourist and residential area. With course topics offered in Latin American Economic Development, Spanish language, Latin American Film, Chilean Culture, Chilean Literature, and Latin American Social Structure, classes are taught at the prestigious Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV). Students will have the unique opportunity to live with Chilean families for a total Spanish immersion experience. This program has been discontinued as of 2013.

Summer in Argentina
The Stone Center for Latin American Studies is offering this exciting five week program in Buenos Aires, Argentina, through the Universidad de San Andrés. Explore the second-largest metropolis in South America while earning credit for courses on Spanish language, Hispanic Cities: Buenos Aires, Argentine history, literature, and popular culture. Stay with Argentine families in a homestay and improve your conversational skills in Spanish. Participate in a tango dance class, attend a folkloric dance show, go on a graffiti tour, and experience other exciting cultural activities within and around the city. This program has been discontinued as of 2016.

Summer in Costa Rica
This six-week program is based at Tulane University‘€™s own beautiful campus of CIAPA, a prestigious academic research institution in the midst of the capital city of San José, since 2009. The CIAPA campus houses multiple lecture and seminar rooms where students will be housed in modern dormitories, and take course offerings in Spanish language, Latin American Culture, Social Justice Service Learning, Central American Politics, Environmental Biology, or Tropical Ecology. Constant exposure to Spanish will help students develop stronger language communication skills at any level. Students will embark on adventures to tropical rainforests, volcanoes, and beautiful beaches, with excursions to Manuel Antonio, Irazú, Cahuita, and Monteverde. This program has been discontinued as of 2018.

Ecuador: Tropical Field Biology and Conversation
This short-term summer abroad program offered by Tulane’s Center for Public Service in the Chocó Rainforest invites all majors to spend two weeks in the Andes Mountains of Ecuador. Students have the opportunity to apply the theory and knowledge they have acquired in the classroom to the real world. Students will experience first-hand the challenges and rewards of conducting field research and implementing conservation activities in tropical environments. These activities will take place within a context of community engagement based on active collaboration and interaction with Ecuadorian local residents in a variety of contexts. Students will design and implement a “hands-on” research project related to tropical ecology with instructor supervision. This research will be conducted at two different sites in Ecuador, one on the western (Amazonian) slope of the Andes and one of the eastern (Pacific) slope. In addition, the program will visit a number of other natural areas more briefly, to provide students with some perspective on the diverse array of habitats found in the Tropics. Students will also be exposed to a number of conservation efforts, which includes visits to sustainable coffee and cacao production; environmental education initiatives; small-scale agricultural projects designed to improve the nutrition of local residents; and eco-tourism ventures. This program was offered in August 2013.

Law and Sustainable Development: Comparative and International Perspectives in Rio de Janeiro
This short-term summer abroad program offered by Tulane’s Law School and Payson Center for International Development focuses on Comparative Perspectives of Law and International Development, and partners with the Fundação Getulio Vargas Faculty of Law (“FGV Direito-Rio”), one of the best law faculties in Brazil. We offer students the widest possible exposure to Brazil, Brazilian society and legal institutions, and to diverse learning environments, including classes supplemented by role-playing and presentations from local lawyers and government. Students to take one or two sessions, each of two and a half weeks duration. With its two-session format, the program offers students with work or other family commitments the option to come for two weeks and benefit from the richness of the foreign study experience. For students who can come for an entire month (and, ideally, students are encouraged to come for the whole time), the program offers the opportunity to both profit from the intense study format and also have brief breaks to explore Rio and its metropolitan area as they wish.
The program will include a mixture of learning experiences. Traditional lecture and class discussions will be supplemented by role-playing exercises and on-site demonstrations from local researchers and practitioners. All lectures will be in English or accompanied by English translation. Consistent with American Bar Association accreditation standards for foreign programs, where there is translation, extra class time will be added since translation time may not count as class time.
This program has been designed to offer students the widest possible exposure to Brazil and, above all, to the richness of its most famous city, Rio de Janeiro. The program is demanding intellectually and professionally. However, Brazilians are famous for their ability to weave work and pleasure together. Students can also be assured that they will have time to enjoy themselves apart from their studies and return home invigorated by their time in (as Cariocas say) a cidade maravilhosa the marvelous city. This program was offered summer 2013.

Migration, Race, and Identity in the Dominican Republic
Join Tulane faculty Dr. Annie Gibson and Carolyn Barber-Pierre on a 15-day cultural immersion program to explore the intersections of race, culture and immigration in the Dominican Republic. Students will explore the Dominican-Haitian relationship from colonial times to present and together we will travel from Santiago to Dajabón on the border with Haiti, highlighting the ways that the DR and Haiti are interconnected and ways in which they have developed differently. We will explore the development of plantation economies during the colonial period, the control of caudillos in their respective national politics and societies, the role of U.S Imperialism and international development initiatives, the rise and fall of dictatorial regimes, and the importance of the island‘€™s diaspora. Students will be exposed to how centuries of racism and fear shaped the people of two nations and are echoed today in a modern-day immigration crisis in which the Dominican Republic threatened to deport over a hundred thousand Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent.
Through participation in this program students will be enrolled in a sequence of three 1-credit courses: 1-credit prior to departure (online), 1-credit while abroad, and 1-credit upon return to the Tulane campus (online). Students will be enrolled and are expected to complete all 3-credits. Courses are designed to give students the skill set to capitalize from the outset on the experiences, network connections, and academic environment that this experience offers and then translate those experiences into an internationally-focused undergraduate career upon return to campus. Students will combine classroom learning with hands-on application of the material through assignments designed to explore their overseas experiences and apply them to their chosen course of study. This program was offered in June 2018.

Suriname Summer Program
Through Tulane University‘€™s unique partnerships with Suriname‘€™s Anton de Kom University, Ministry of Public Health and The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH), students will explore key issues affecting the heath of Suriname’s population and ecosystem: Science, practice, and policy approaches to address public health issues affecting environmental and human health; Important aspects of disaster management; Medicinal characteristics of plants; Risks of environmental contamination; Role of the ecosystem as a vital component to community health; Field Trips ‘€” overnight trip to the rainforest; see brown nose dolphins; orchids and bird sanctuary.
The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH) is designed to address high-priority environmental and occupational health risks in Suriname and those common to the increasingly vulnerable Caribbean region: EOH risks associated with gold mining‘€“related mercury contamination; Pesticide use in agriculture; Indigenous nutraceutical contamination. This program was offered July 2018.

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Zale-Kimmerling Writer in Residence Valeria Luiselli

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via Newcomb Institute

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions and Lost Children Archive. She is the recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship and the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, The Carnegie Medal, an American Book Award, and has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kirkus Prize, and the Booker Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney’s, among other publications, and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She is a Writer in Residence at Bard College and lives in New York City.

The Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence Program brings renowned woman writers to the Tulane campus. Coordinated through the Newcomb Institute, the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program was established by Dana Zale Gerard, NC ‘€˜85, and made possible by an annual gift from the M.B. and Edna Zale Foundation of Dallas, Texas. Since 2006, the program has been generously supported by Barnes & Noble College Booksellers. In 2010, the program became fully endowed through a gift from Martha McCarty Kimmerling, NC‘€™63, and known as the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program.

Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality Exhibit K-12 Educator Orientation

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Join us for an evening with Tom Friel, Coordinator for Interpretation and Public Engagement as he walks through an innovative tool developed to share the Newcomb Art Museum’s latest exhibit, Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality. The program is designed to introduce K-12 educators to Laura Anderson Barbata’s work and focus on specific elements of the exhibit that connect deeply to the K-12 classroom. While the exhibit is open to limited public access, it plans to open to the public and school visits by Fall 2021. Educators from across the country will find this online introduction to Barbata’s work a valuable resource as the virtual exhibit serves as a unique tool for online learning.

Read more about this exhibit from the Newcomb Gallery of Art About the Exhibit page below:

“The process-driven conceptual practices of artist Laura Anderson Barbata (b. 1958, Mexico City, Mexico) engage a wide variety of platforms and geographies. Centered on issues of cultural diversity, ethnography, and sustainability, her work blends political activism, street theater, traditional techniques, and arts education. Since the early 1990s, she has initiated projects with people living in the Amazon of Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Norway, and New York. The results from these collaborations range from public processional performances, artist books and handmade paper, textiles, countless garments, and the repatriation of an exploited 19thcentury Mexican woman ‘€” each designed to bring public attention to issues of civil, indigenous, and environmental rights.

In Transcommunality, work from five of Barbata‘€™s previous collaborations across the Americas are presented together for the first time. Though varying in process, tradition, and message, each of these projects emphasize Barbata‘€™s understanding of art as a system of shared practical actions that has the capacity to increase connection. The majority of the works presented are costumed sculptures typically worn by stilt-dancing communities. Through the design and presentation of these sculptures, Barbata fosters a social exchange that activates stilt-dancing‘€™s improvisational magic and world history. At the core of this creative practice is the concept of reciprocity: the balanced exchange of ideas and knowledge.

The events of this past year ‘€” from the uprisings across the country in response to fatal police shootings to the disproportionate impacts of Covid-19 among Black and brown communities to the bitter divisiveness of the 2020 presidential election ‘€” have renewed the urgency for Barbata‘€™s multifaceted practice. In featured projects such as Intervention: Indigo, participants from various backgrounds reckon with the past to address systemic violence and human rights abuses, calling attention to specific instances of social justice. In The Repatriation of Julia Pastrana, Barbata‘€™s efforts critically shift the narratives of human worth and cultural memory. The paper and mask works presented in the show demonstrate the impact of individual and community reciprocity, both intentional and organic. Through her performance partnerships in Trinidad and Tobago, New York, and Oaxaca, represented throughout the museum, onlookers are invited to connect to the traditions of West Africa, the Amazon, Mexico, and the Caribbean and the narratives these costume sculptures reflect on the environment, indigenous cultures, folklore, and religious cosmologies.

By encouraging diverse collaborators to resist homogenization and deploy the creative skills inherent to authentic local expressions and their survival, Barbata promotes the revival of intangible cultural heritage. Transcommunality horizontally values the systems of oral history and folklore, spirituality, and interdisciplinary academic thought that shape Barbata‘€™s engaging creations, celebrating the dignity, creativity, and vibrancy of the human spirit.”

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An Evening with Multi-Award Winning Author Elizabeth Acevedo

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Join us for an evening with Elizabeth Acevedo. Acevedo presents her third book, Clap When You Land, and discusses her writing process and performance background. The discussion will be followed by a reading.

Poet, novelist, and National Poetry Slam Champion, Elizabeth Acevedo was born and raised in New York City, the only daughter of Dominican immigrants. She is the author of Clap When You Land, (Quill Tree Books, 2020); With the Fire On High, (Harper, 2019); the New York Times best-selling and award-winning novel, The Poet X. (HarperCollins, 2018), winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Adult Fiction, the 2019 Michael L. Printz Award, and the Carnegie Medal; and the poetry chapbook Beastgirl & Other Origin Myths. (YesYes Books, 2016), a collection of folkloric poems centered on the historical, mythological, gendered and geographic experiences of a first-generation American woman. From the border in the Dominican Republic, to the bustling streets of New York City, Acevedo’s writing celebrates a rich cultural heritage from the island, inherited and adapted by its diaspora, while at the same time rages against its colonial legacies of oppression and exploitation. The beauty and power of much of her work lies at the tensioned crossroads of these competing, yet complementary, desires.

This online program is free and open to the public. It is part of our ongoing series of public engagement programs with Latinx writers that explore Latin America, race, and identity. Read more about Acevedo’s work in this recent article from The Atlantic.

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Newcomb Institute.

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Other Supported Events

  • March 16, 2021 – An Evening with Dominican Musician and Poet, Fermín Ceballos. Sponsored by the Center for the Gulf South
  • March 25, 2021 – Open Mic Night In Celebration of Elizabeth Acevedo. Sponsored by the Tulane Black Student Union (tBSU) and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

Please help us to support local bookstores by purchasing any copies of Acevedo’s books at Tubby & Coo’s.

For more information, please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: Sociolinguistic Language Variation

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The March 25th session will focus on sociolinguistic variations within the Kaqchikel language. It will be facilitated by Rebecca Moore.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: K'iche' Language Learning

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The April 29th session will focus on K’iche’ language learning with guest speaker Nela Petronila Tahay Tzay. It will be facilitated by Ignacio Carvajal.

Global Read Webinar Series Spring 2021

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies coordinates the annual CLASP Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature and is excited to collaborate with other world area book awards on this exciting online program. Join us this spring 2021 as we invite award winning authors to join us in an online conversation about social justice, the writing process and an exploration of culture and identity across world regions. This annual Global Read Webinar series invites readers of all ages to join us as we explore books for the K-12 classroom recognized by world area book awards such as the Africana Book Award, the Américas Award, the Freeman Book Award, the Middle East Outreach Council Book Award, and the South Asia Book Award.

Each webinar features a presentation by an award-winning author with discussion on how to incorporate multicultural literature into the classroom. Be sure to join the conversation with our webinar hashtag #2021ReadingAcrossCultures.

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SPRING 2021 SCHEDULE – Read more about the program here.
All webinars are at 7:00 PM EST.

  • January 12 – The Américas Award highlights the 2020 Honor Book, The Moon Within by Aida Salazar
  • February 3 – The Children’s Africana Book Award highlights the 2020 book award winning, Hector by Adrienne Wright
  • March 11 – The Middle East Outreach Award presents 2020 Picture Book award winner, Salma the Syrian Chef by Danny Ramadan, illustrated by Anna Bron
  • April – Freeman Book Award, a project of the National Consortium for Teaching Asia will present a book TBD.
  • May 13 – South Asia Book Award presents The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani

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All sessions are free and open to the public. All times listed refer to Eastern Standard Time (EST). Sponsored by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, the South Asia National Outreach Consortium, the Middle East Outreach Council, and African Studies Outreach Council, The National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.