Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Cuba (Havana) Cuban Culture and Society

Since 1997, Tulane’s Summer in Cuba program has offered undergraduate students a unique opportunity for an in-depth learning experience in our closest Caribbean neighbor. Based in Havana, Cuba’s vibrant capital and the cultural and economic center of the island, the program provides participants with accommodations in the heart of the city – offering many opportunities for language and cultural immersion outside the classroom. Classes are hosted by the University of Havana, an internationally prestigious Cuban academic institution. Course offerings include: Afro-Cuban Heritage: History and Culture, Cuban Culture and Society, Urban Landscape: Imagining Havana, Spanish, and Cuban Literature. With the exception of Spanish language studies and the Cuban Literature course, all classes are taught in English unless otherwise noted and are complemented by readings and field trips. This program is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. This program has been discontinued as of June 30, 2004. For information on current programs in Cuba, visit the Cuban and Caribbean Studies website.

Cuba (Havana) International Public Health

This summer program is open to graduate students seeking on-site experience with public health issues in developing countries. The course will expose students to multiple aspects of the Cuban health system. It will take place in the unique social and political environment of Havana, and involve daily lectures by various health authorities in the country, and several visits to important sites relevant to the health system. It will challenge students to critically evaluate current issues in Cuban development that affect its population’s health status. In addition, students will gain an applied understanding of the current methods used to measure social change within Cuba. This program has been discontinued as of June 30, 2004. For information on the current Public Health in Cuba program, visit the web page.

Dominican Republic

The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are pleased to offer students the opportunity to study in the Dominican Republic during a three-week summer program. Participating students will have a unique opportunity to observe and study the history, culture, social structures, institutions, and landscape (built and natural) of the Dominican Republic in the context of the Caribbean. Guest lectures by local specialists in conjunction with extensive field trips throughout the country will enhance the two courses offered, Dominican Culture and Society in a Caribbean Context and Urban Forms and Vernacular Landscapes in the Caribbean. Classes will be held in different locations throughout the Dominican Republic and students will be housed in hotels throughout the island. Associate Provost Ana López, who is also the director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute, will lead the program. A faculty member of the LAS Communication department, Prof. López’s research focuses on Latin American and Caribbean film and popular culture. The co-director of the program is Prof. Mark Thomas, who teaches historical preservation and landscape architecture in the Tulane School of Architecture. This program has been discontinued as of 2008. For current opportunities in the Dominican Republic, please visit the Academic/Semester Year Programs page.

Peru (Norte Chico Region) Archaeology and Cultural History
Through Tulane’s Archaeological Program in Peru, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies offers students the opportunity to study in the Norte Chico region of Peru, an area that has gained recent fame for its prehistoric complexity and late Chimu occupation. The recent discovery of early evidence of social complexity in the region, dating to approximately 2900 years ago, makes this an ideal time for students to explore this prehistoric culture . El Norte Chico region is located 200 kilometers north of Lima, the nation’s capital, and is famous not only for its early monumental architecture, but also for its impressive Chimu occupation that includes large walled fortresses. As part of this archaeological field school, students will be exposed to the prehistoric Peruvian cultures that once occupied this area and will be taught archaeological field survey methods and analysis techniques. Kit Nelson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University and a specialist in the late Pre-ceramic and Early Initial Period of Peru, leads the program. This program has been discontinued as of 2008. For current opportunities in Peru, please visit the Academic/Semester Year Programs page.

Summer in Chile
The Stone Center for Latin American Studies invites students interested in issues on Latin American development, economy, and society to participate in this exciting opportunity in the Southern Cone. The program is based out of Valparaíso, Chile, the country’s most important port city, located in the Fifth Region on the coast due west of the capital city of Santiago. Valparaíso is linked by rail, road, and seawall to the city of Viña del Mar, an important tourist and residential area. With course topics offered in Latin American Economic Development, Spanish language, Latin American Film, Chilean Culture, Chilean Literature, and Latin American Social Structure, classes are taught at the prestigious Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso (PUCV). Students will have the unique opportunity to live with Chilean families for a total Spanish immersion experience. This program has been discontinued as of 2013.

Summer in Argentina
The Stone Center for Latin American Studies is offering this exciting five week program in Buenos Aires, Argentina, through the Universidad de San Andrés. Explore the second-largest metropolis in South America while earning credit for courses on Spanish language, Hispanic Cities: Buenos Aires, Argentine history, literature, and popular culture. Stay with Argentine families in a homestay and improve your conversational skills in Spanish. Participate in a tango dance class, attend a folkloric dance show, go on a graffiti tour, and experience other exciting cultural activities within and around the city. This program has been discontinued as of 2016.

Summer in Costa Rica
This six-week program is based at Tulane University’s own beautiful campus of CIAPA, a prestigious academic research institution in the midst of the capital city of San José, since 2009. The CIAPA campus houses multiple lecture and seminar rooms where students will be housed in modern dormitories, and take course offerings in Spanish language, Latin American Culture, Social Justice Service Learning, Central American Politics, Environmental Biology, or Tropical Ecology. Constant exposure to Spanish will help students develop stronger language communication skills at any level. Students will embark on adventures to tropical rainforests, volcanoes, and beautiful beaches, with excursions to Manuel Antonio, Irazú, Cahuita, and Monteverde. This program has been discontinued as of 2018.

Ecuador: Tropical Field Biology and Conversation
This short-term summer abroad program offered by Tulane’s Center for Public Service in the Chocó Rainforest invites all majors to spend two weeks in the Andes Mountains of Ecuador. Students have the opportunity to apply the theory and knowledge they have acquired in the classroom to the real world. Students will experience first-hand the challenges and rewards of conducting field research and implementing conservation activities in tropical environments. These activities will take place within a context of community engagement based on active collaboration and interaction with Ecuadorian local residents in a variety of contexts. Students will design and implement a “hands-on” research project related to tropical ecology with instructor supervision. This research will be conducted at two different sites in Ecuador, one on the western (Amazonian) slope of the Andes and one of the eastern (Pacific) slope. In addition, the program will visit a number of other natural areas more briefly, to provide students with some perspective on the diverse array of habitats found in the Tropics. Students will also be exposed to a number of conservation efforts, which includes visits to sustainable coffee and cacao production; environmental education initiatives; small-scale agricultural projects designed to improve the nutrition of local residents; and eco-tourism ventures. This program was offered in August 2013.

Law and Sustainable Development: Comparative and International Perspectives in Rio de Janeiro
This short-term summer abroad program offered by Tulane’s Law School and Payson Center for International Development focuses on Comparative Perspectives of Law and International Development, and partners with the Fundação Getulio Vargas Faculty of Law (“FGV Direito-Rio”), one of the best law faculties in Brazil. We offer students the widest possible exposure to Brazil, Brazilian society and legal institutions, and to diverse learning environments, including classes supplemented by role-playing and presentations from local lawyers and government. Students to take one or two sessions, each of two and a half weeks duration. With its two-session format, the program offers students with work or other family commitments the option to come for two weeks and benefit from the richness of the foreign study experience. For students who can come for an entire month (and, ideally, students are encouraged to come for the whole time), the program offers the opportunity to both profit from the intense study format and also have brief breaks to explore Rio and its metropolitan area as they wish.
The program will include a mixture of learning experiences. Traditional lecture and class discussions will be supplemented by role-playing exercises and on-site demonstrations from local researchers and practitioners. All lectures will be in English or accompanied by English translation. Consistent with American Bar Association accreditation standards for foreign programs, where there is translation, extra class time will be added since translation time may not count as class time.
This program has been designed to offer students the widest possible exposure to Brazil and, above all, to the richness of its most famous city, Rio de Janeiro. The program is demanding intellectually and professionally. However, Brazilians are famous for their ability to weave work and pleasure together. Students can also be assured that they will have time to enjoy themselves apart from their studies and return home invigorated by their time in (as Cariocas say) a cidade maravilhosa the marvelous city. This program was offered summer 2013.

Migration, Race, and Identity in the Dominican Republic
Join Tulane faculty Dr. Annie Gibson and Carolyn Barber-Pierre on a 15-day cultural immersion program to explore the intersections of race, culture and immigration in the Dominican Republic. Students will explore the Dominican-Haitian relationship from colonial times to present and together we will travel from Santiago to Dajabón on the border with Haiti, highlighting the ways that the DR and Haiti are interconnected and ways in which they have developed differently. We will explore the development of plantation economies during the colonial period, the control of caudillos in their respective national politics and societies, the role of U.S Imperialism and international development initiatives, the rise and fall of dictatorial regimes, and the importance of the island’s diaspora. Students will be exposed to how centuries of racism and fear shaped the people of two nations and are echoed today in a modern-day immigration crisis in which the Dominican Republic threatened to deport over a hundred thousand Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent.
Through participation in this program students will be enrolled in a sequence of three 1-credit courses: 1-credit prior to departure (online), 1-credit while abroad, and 1-credit upon return to the Tulane campus (online). Students will be enrolled and are expected to complete all 3-credits. Courses are designed to give students the skill set to capitalize from the outset on the experiences, network connections, and academic environment that this experience offers and then translate those experiences into an internationally-focused undergraduate career upon return to campus. Students will combine classroom learning with hands-on application of the material through assignments designed to explore their overseas experiences and apply them to their chosen course of study. This program was offered in June 2018.

Suriname Summer Program
Through Tulane University’s unique partnerships with Suriname’s Anton de Kom University, Ministry of Public Health and The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH), students will explore key issues affecting the heath of Suriname’s population and ecosystem: Science, practice, and policy approaches to address public health issues affecting environmental and human health; Important aspects of disaster management; Medicinal characteristics of plants; Risks of environmental contamination; Role of the ecosystem as a vital component to community health; Field Trips – overnight trip to the rainforest; see brown nose dolphins; orchids and bird sanctuary.
The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH) is designed to address high-priority environmental and occupational health risks in Suriname and those common to the increasingly vulnerable Caribbean region: EOH risks associated with gold mining–related mercury contamination; Pesticide use in agriculture; Indigenous nutraceutical contamination. This program was offered July 2018.

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The Broad Theater to host Educator Night with viewing of the film ROMA

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On Friday, December 14 at 6:45 PM, please join your local New Orleans educators for a New Orleans Educator Night where educators may enjoy a special discounted viewing of the film ROMA at the Broad Theater.

The most personal project to date from Academy Award-winning director and writer Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity, Children of Men, Y Tu Mamá También), ROMA follows Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio), a young domestic worker for a family in the middle-class neighborhood of Roma in Mexico City. Delivering an artful love letter to the women who raised him, Cuarón draws on his own childhood to create a vivid and emotional portrait of domestic strife and social hierarchy amidst political turmoil of the 1970s.

Educators will be able to purchase a $15 package, which includes a ticket, draft wine or beer or well cocktail, and a small popcorn. Educators must present their IDs. As the film screening is open to the public, educators must say they are attending Educator Night with the Stone Center for Latin American Studies to receive the discount. Tickets will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

La Hora del Cuento: Fall Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

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This fall, join us for La hora del cuenta bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday, August 25 until Saturday, December 29. Children and parents are welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, September 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 3
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 1
10:30 AM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, August 25
10:30 AM

Saturday, September 22
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 27
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 24
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 29
10:30 AM

Stone Center for Latin American Studies to host 11th annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 11th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on Saturday, January 26, 2019. The deadline to apply for the workshop is January 15, 2019.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 15, 2019, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraphy statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features photographs showcasing Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in conjunction with PhotoNOLA 2018 will be showcasing a photographic exhibition titled Diego and Frida: A Halfway Smile from December 7, 2018 through February 15, 2019.

The opening reception will be held on December 7, 2018 from 6:00 PM through 9:00 PM.

The exhibition Diego and Frida, A Halfway Smile consists of personal photographs through which the wonderful world shared by Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo is revealed. One of the most controversial couples in the history of art in Mexico, united for almost 25 years, their relationship is marked by an infinity of encounters and disagreements. This axis of love witnessed innumerable contacts, closeness, complicity and deep friendships with great personalities of the time. It is through the images captured by friends like Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Nicolas Murray and Edward Weston that different stages of the relationship, life, pain and death of Frida and Diego are presented.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.

16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium: The Ancient Maya and Collapse

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The Middle American Research Institute, in collaboration with Tulane’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, New Orleans Museum of Art, and Mexican Consulate in New Orleans, is proud to announce the 16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium beginning on Thursday, February 14, and concluding on Sunday, February 17, 2019. This year’s conference The Center Could Not Hold: The Ancient Maya and Collapse will explore recent developments in Maya studies as they relate to the broader topic of collapse. Speakers and workshops will address the issue of political decline over the span of ancient Maya prehistory. These researchers will help us address the collapse in a multi-disciplinary fashion and bring attention to recent research in the region.

On Friday, February 15, at 6:00 PM, the keynote address will be given by Jeremy A. Sabloff, External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, of the University of Pennsylvania. In his talk Is “Collapse” a Useful Term in Understanding Pre-Columbian Maya History?, Dr. Sabloff considers how the term “collapse” has, in recent years, become quite controversial, and argues that there is good reason to question the utility of this loaded word going forward. This keynote talk will focus on understandings of the late 8th and early 9th centuries CE cultural processes and environmental events in the Maya Lowlands that culminated in what has often been seen as a political collapse. Moreover, the talk will examine whether such understanding can help illuminate comparable trends at other times in Maya history and in other complex societies in general.

Since 2002, the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University has hosted a weekend of talks and workshops dedicated to the study of the Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. This yearly meeting has called upon scholars from a wide spectrum of specialties including archaeology, art history, cultural anthropology, epigraphy, history, and linguistics to elucidate the many facets of this fascinating Mesoamerican culture. In developing a broad approach to the subject matter, the conference aims to draw the interest of a wide ranging group of participants from the expert to the beginner.

To view the schedule, registration, and additional information, please visit the Tulane Maya Symposium website.

2019 Global Read Webinar Series: Diversity in children's literature for the classroom

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This spring, the World Area Book Awards (Américas Award, Africana Book Award, Middle East Book Award, South Asia Book Award, and the Freeman Book Award) will sponsor a free 60 minute webinar on a book recognized by one of the awards and facilitate a discussion with the author on how to incorporate the book into the classroom.

The 2019 Global Read Webinar Series will focus on the theme diversity in children’s literature. The webinar will be recorded and archived online and have accompanying curricula to correspond with the book.

To register and learn more information about the Spring 2019 series, please visit:
internationalizingsocialstudies.blog

Webinar Schedule

January
Middle East Book Award

February
Africana Book Award

March
Américas Book Award

April
Freeman Book Award

May
South Asia Book Award and picture books from all book awards