Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Mayan Language Institute in Guatemala
Intensive Language & Culture Program in K’iche’ and Kaqchikel Maya
Antigua, Guatemala | June 16 – July 27, 2019

The Mayan Language Institute is a six-week intensive language immersion program in Kaqchikel Maya and K’iche’ Maya. Students study with both U.S. faculty and native speakers and participate on cultural activities, lectures, discussions, and excursions. With more than 1.5 million K’iche’ and Kaqchikel speakers in Guatemala, the goal of the institute is to help students develop and advance proficiency in their chosen language and to gain a better understanding of the cultural and political contexts that have affected the historical development and preservation of the language. Efforts to protect these languages are playing a pivotal role in the Mayan struggle to regain control over their political and cultural destiny.

Students pursuing K’iche’ Maya will spend one week in Antigua and five weeks in Nahualá, and will be placed with local family homestays. Students pursuing Kaqchikel Maya will spend six weeks in Antigua and will be responsible for finding their own local lodging accommodations and meals. Classes in Antigua will take place at the Proyecto Lingüístico Francisco Marroquín (PLFM), a language school founded in 1969 whose mission is to teach, investigate, and preserve Mayan languages and culture. Students are encouraged to extend their stay in Guatemala beyond the program end date to continue developing their language skills.




COURSES OFFERED:
Students will take one language course and one culture course.

  • Beginning, Intermediate, or Advanced Kaqchikel or K’iche’ Maya language (3 credits – ANTH 6000-7000)
  • Kaqchikel or K’iche’ Maya Culture (3 credits – ANTH 6000-7000)

PROGRAM COST:
The cost of the six-week program for K’iche’ Maya is $6,300 total:

  • $5,000 Tuition
  • $1,300 Housing & Logistics Fees
    Tuition costs include six Tulane credits (tuition for two courses, transferable to other universities). Housing & logistics costs ($1,300) include local family home-stays (one week in Antigua; five weeks in Nahualá) and three meals per day (except Sundays), medical insurance, transportation to/from the airport (GUA), and specialized group activities and excursions. Airfare to/from Antigua (GUA), extra meals, and incidental expenses, such as laundry, passport/visa fees, vaccinations, etc., are not included in the program cost.

The cost of the six-week program for Kaqchikel Maya is $5,800 total:

  • $5,000 Tuition
  • $800 Logistics-Only Fee
    Tuition costs include six Tulane credits (tuition for two courses, transferable to other universities). The logistics-only fee ($800) includes medical insurance, transportation to/from the airport (GUA), and specialized group activities and excursions. Airfare to/from Antigua (GUA), housing and meals, and incidental expenses, such as laundry, passport/visa fees, vaccinations, etc., are not included in the program cost. Students will be responsible for finding their own housing for six weeks in Antigua. If you need assistance finding housing in Antigua, please contact the Kaqchikel Program Director, Professor Judie Maxwell (maxwell@tulane.edu).

FLAS Summer Fellowships
This program qualifies as a FLAS-eligible program with 140 contact hours of language instruction. For more information on application procedures, eligible students interested in applying should visit the following:
Graduate students, click here. (scroll down to “FLAS Summer Fellowships”)
Tulane Undergraduates, click here. (scroll down to “FLAS Summer Fellowships”)
The FLAS Fellowship application deadline will be in February 2019.
Note that the fellowship application and the program application are separate applications.


Complete applications through the online application portal will include:
  • Student’s general and academic information
  • Personal statement of intent
  • Official copy of transcript
  • Copy of front page of VALID passport
  • One letter of recommendation
  • $50 non-refundable deposit (by credit card online, OR by check made payable to Tulane University; dropped off or mailed to the Stone Center, 100 Jones Hall, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118.)

Click here to access the online application through the Office of Study Abroad.
Non-Tulane students will be required to create an account. If you have questions about the application or program, please contact Laura by email at sclassum@tulane.edu or by phone at 504-862-8629.
Application deadline: March 1, 2019.

For a downloadable flyer of this program, click here.

This program is offered in partnership between:
Tulane University Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Vanderbilt University Center for Latin American Studies

For questions on this program, please call 504.862.8629, or email sclassum_at_tulane.edu.

View photos from past programs here:
2014

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Upcoming Events

China's Belt and Road Initiative in Latin America: New Wine in Old Bottles?

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The Center for Inter-American Policy and Research will be hosting Dr. Matt Ferchen for a talk titled China’s belt and Road Initiative in Latin America: New Wine in Old Bottles? on January 23, 2019 at noon.

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) has attracted global attention since it was first introduced by President Xi Jinping in 2013. Despite the hype and anxiety surrounding the BRI’s apparent extension to the region, it remains unclear whether its rollout there will change entrenched patters, challenges, and dysfunctions in the China-LAC (Latin American and Caribbean) relationship or merely deepen them. Moreover, at a time of growing US-China strategic rivalry, the expansion of BRI-themed deal-making in LAC is already playing into growing major-power competition and tension.

Matt Ferchen is a nonresident scholar at the Carnegie-Tsinghua Center for Global Policy where he runs the China and the Developing World Program. From 2008-2017 Ferchen was the first and only full-time foreign member of the International Relations Department at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Dr. Ferchen has a Masters in Latin America and China Studies from John Hopkins SAIS (1997) and a Ph.D. in Comparative Politics and International Relations from Cornell (2008).

Lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Sociology Colloquium Series to host talk by Javier Auyero on collusion and violence in Argentina

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Join the Sociology Department at Tulane University in welcoming Dr. Javier Auyero, for a talk titled The Ambivalent State: Collusion and Violence in Latin America on Thursday, January 24, at 3:30 PM.

Drawing upon long-term ethnographic fieldwork in a poor high-crime neighborhood of Argentina and documentary evidence from court cases involving drug traffickers and police officers, this talk examines the clandestine connections between participants in the illicit drug trade and members of the state security forces – and their impact on skyrocketing urban violence. The presentation unpacks the much-referred to (but seldom scrutinized) content of police-criminal collusion reconstructing the resources, relational practices, and processes at its core. The talk makes its three-fold argument by way of empirical demonstration: a) illicit relationships between police agents and traffickers serve the latter to achieve a quasi-monopoly in the use of force over a territory that is central to the prosecution of their illegal trade, b) clandestine relationships between police officers and traffickers feed the systemic violence that characterizes the market of illegal drugs and contributes to localized violence, and c) police-trafficker collusion fosters widespread skepticism about law-enforcement among residents of low-income violent neighborhoods.

Dr. Javier Auyero is the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long in Latin American Sociology at the University of Texas-Austin. He is the author of Poor People’s Politics, Contentious Lives, Routine Politics and Violence in Argentina, and Patients of the State. Together with Débora Swistun, he co-authored Flammable: Environmental Suffering in an Argentine Shantytown. His new book, In Harm’s Way: The dynamics of urban violence, co-authored with María Fernanda Berti, was recently published by Princeton University Press. He is also the editor of Invisible City: Life and Labor in Austin, Texas (published this year by University of Texas Press), and co-editor – with Philippe Bourgois and Nancy Scheper-Hughes – of Violence at the Urban Margins (published this year by Oxford University Press).

Stone Center for Latin American Studies to host 11th annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 11th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on Saturday, January 26, 2019. The deadline to apply for the workshop is January 15, 2019.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 15, 2019, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraph statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.

K-12 Professional Development Opportunity: Resources and Pedagogy on Latin American Studies

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On Saturday, January 26, 2019, join us at the Louisiana Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP) Annual Meeting for a professional development opportunity. This year’s meeting will include a presentation on pedagogy by Lolla Blas Troncoso, a middle school Spanish Instructor at the Isidore Newman School and a session on the Latin American Resources available at Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies by Denise Woltering-Vargas, Senior Program Manager at Tulane University’s Stone Center Latin American Studies.

This conference is free and open to all educators and membership in the AATSP is not required. Please RSVP as space is limited. Please RSVP to Stephanie Davis.

The event will be held in the Reynolds Room at the Isidore Newman School. Please use the Loyola Street Lower School entrance, located at 5320 Loyola, the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Loyola Street.

K-12 Educator Workshop at the Audubon Zoo: Rescuing the Forests

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Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with the Audubon Nature Institute will be hosting a K-12 educator workshop Rescuing the Rainforest at the Audubon Zoo on Saturday, February 2, 2019. Rescuing the Rainforest will focus on conservation efforts and environment of Central American rainforests. This workshop is a great way to learn how to bring real world science into your classroom. Activities will incorporate a variety of sciences and other subjects including: art, environmental science, cultural components, anthropology, computer science and technology. While it is geared for middle and high school teachers, this workshop is open to all educators formal and informal. We are delighted to have Dr. Katharine Jack, Professor of Anthropology and Director of Environmental Studies at Tulane University, join us for this workshop.

Please register here. The cost is $45.00 per participant. Lunch will be provided.

Please contact educationprograms@auduboninstitute.org for additional information.

Latin American Library to host Brazilian photographer João Farkas for talk and exhibit Amazônia Ocupada

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The Latin American Library in collaboration with the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the Departments of History and Spanish & Portuguese at Tulane University will be hosting an exhibit opening and talk titled Amazônia Ocupada, featuring Brazilian photographer João Farkas on Friday, February 8, 2019. The evening will begin with a conversation between João Farkas and professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Christopher Dunn. A reception will follow.

Amazônia Ocupada features the work of Brazilian photographer João Farkas, who documented the mass migration of workers from throughout Brazil who came to the Amazon basin in the 1980s and 1990s to try their luck in gold mining, logging and cattle ranching, often with devastating effects on the environment and the indigenous peoples of the region. The exhibit also includes rare books, maps, and other material from the special collections of The Latin American Library tracing Western conceptualizations of the Amazon region beginning with the earliest post-contact explorations in the 16th century to 20th century narratives about the region.

João Farkas is one of Brazil’s leading documentary and environmental photographers with projects that document life in the coastal village of Trancoso, Bahia, the carnival masks of Maragojipe, Bahia, and the world’s largest tropical wetland, the Pantanal, as well as the occupation of the Amazon.

A related symposium featuring historians and anthropologists of the Amazon region will be held on Saturday February 9, 2019, in Jones Hall 100A, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. More information forthcoming.

These events are sponsored by The Latin American Library, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the Departments of History and Spanish & Portuguese at Tulane University.

Photo credit: João Farkas Amazonia