Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

NOMA Exhibit - Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century

July 24th, 2010 - October 24th, 2010
The museum is open five days a week - Wednesday, 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Thursday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location
New Orleans Museum of Art
One Collins C. Diboll Circle
City Park
New Orleans, LA 70124

A little known American Indian archive will be unveiled at the New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) from July 24 until October 24, 2010. “Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century” will be the first comprehensive exhibition of nineteenth century photography, Southwestern artifacts and archival research from the George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive at Tulane University.

In collaboration with Tulane’s Middle American Research Institute (MARI) and Latin American Library (LAL), the exhibition offers a special glimpse of the Tulane archive featuring 150 objects from Pepper’s personal Native American art collection as well as 140 photographic images. Pepper, a museum ethnologist and scholar, used textiles, pottery, baskets, and other Pueblo and Navajo paraphernalia as visual complements to his lectures. Many of the images and the objects in Ancestors and Descendants have never been published or seen by the general public since 1924.

“There has never been an opportunity to bring together this many items from the Pepper archive,” said Paul Tarver, curator of Ancestors and Descendants. “Even in his lifetime, Pepper could only display a handful of objects with a few dozen images he projected through a magic lantern. This is the first time the breadth of the archive has been researched and displayed.”

The objects and images selected for the NOMA exhibition document the relationship between American Indians and the scientists, photographers and tourists who traveled to New Mexico and Arizona at the turn of the twentieth century. MARI and LAL archives include Pepper’s original excavation journals, personal diaries, sketch books, lectures and photographs that illustrate everyday interactions between Pepper and his subjects. The exhibition will utilize excerpts from these materials and bring the time period to life through Pepper’s words.

The exhibition at NOMA will display the wide variety of art forms Pepper collected from the Southwest as well as drawings and original handwritten journals from his Bonito excavation. Ancestors and Descendants presents a rare opportunity to see a collection that was put together over one hundred years ago by a museum ethnologist and early collector and scholar of Native American art.

Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century is curated by Paul J. Tarver, NOMA’s Curator of Pre-Columbian and Native American Art, and co-curated by Cristin J. Nunez. The exhibition is generously funded by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities, and the Cudd Foundation.

EXHIBITION EVENTS

JULY 25: Family Art-Making Activity

JULY 28: 6 pm – Exhibition Walk-through *
7-8 pm – Live music by Flow Tribe *

AUGUST 18: 6 pm – Exhibition Walk-through *

AUGUST 27: Noon – Exhibition Walk-through

SEPTEMBER 8: 6 pm – Exhibition Walk-through *

SEPTEMBER 15: 6 pm – Lecture by Dr. Jonathan E. Reyman in the Stern Auditorium *

SEPTEMBER 19: 1-4 pm – Family Art-Making Activity

SEPTEMBER 24: Noon – Exhibition Walk-through

OCTOBER 13: 6 pm – Lecture by James Sneed in the Stern Auditorium *

* All Wednesday events are free and open to the public. Other listings are free with NOMA admission. For event details, visit: http://www.noma.org/special

NOMA ADMISSION
Wednesdays are FREE for all Museum visitors. Louisiana residents with valid photo identification: Adults, $8; Seniors (65 and up), $7; Children 3-17, $4; Children under 3, free. Out-of-state visitors: Adults, $10; Seniors (65 and up), $9; Children 3-17, $5; Children under 3, free. Free Wednesdays and discounted admission for Louisiana residents is made possible through the generosity of The Helis Foundation.

ABOUT NOMA AND THE BESTHOFF SCULPTURE GARDEN
The New Orleans Museum of Art, founded in 1910 by Isaac Delgado, houses more than 30,000 art objects encompassing 4,000 years of world art. Works from the permanent collection, along with continuously changing temporary exhibitions, are on view in the Museum’s 46 galleries Wednesdays from noon to 8 p.m. and Thursdays to Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission to the adjacent Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, featuring work by 61 artists, including several of the 20th century’s great master sculptors, is always free. The Sculpture Garden is open seven days a week from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. except for Wednesdays, when it’s open until dusk. The New Orleans Museum of Art and the Besthoff Sculpture Garden are fully accessible to handicapped visitors and wheelchairs are available from the front desk.

For more information, call (504) 658-4100 or visit www.noma.org.

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Latin American Library Open House

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The annual Open House at the Latin American Library is an opportunity for the Tulane and greater New Orleans community to come together and celebrate the collections and services at the Latin American Library. For this event, LAL has prepared an exhibit of some recent acquisitions.

Along the side gallery wall to the right of the main entrance, photos by Colombian photo journalist Viki Ospina are featured. During her 44-year career working for news outlets and on documentary films, Ospina has captured candid shots of collective experiences, throughout Colombia. The images on display here offer a window into the 400 images recently acquired by the Latin American Library.

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A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome!

The theme for this semester will be Passion Fruit. So bring your sweet tooth to try this week’s homemade delicacy: Pão de maracujá.

2019 CLASP Américas Award Ceremony & Workshop

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Friday, September 27, 2019
11am-12pm
Author reading with Francie Latour
Location: Hispanic Reading Room

1-1:45pm
Workshop with Duncan Tonatiuh — Maya Codices
Location: Library of Congress, LJ-119
Livestream with classrooms across the U.S.
www.youtube.com/user/LibraryOfCongress

5-7:30pm
Américas Award Ceremony
Livestream with classrooms across the U.S.
www.youtube.com/user/LibraryOfCongress

Click here to register for in-person attendance at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

Bate papo!: Portuguese Conversation Hour

View Full Event Description

A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome!

The theme for this semester will be Passion Fruit. So bring your sweet tooth to try this week’s homemade delicacy: Suco de maracujá.

A talk by Mestre João Grande and Mestre Jelon on capoeira across time and space

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The Spanish and Portuguese Department is hosting this talk with two masters of the art of capoeria. Mestre Joao Grande is one of the last remaining Mestres from the Velha Guarda. He moved to New York in 1990 and, at 86 years old, he continues to hold capoeira classes at his academy in Harlem. He is a student of Mestre Pastinha, the father of capoeira Angola. Mestre Jelon is also from Bahia, and he was the first capoeirista to open up a school in the US back in the 70’s. He was also the choreographer and director of Viva Bahia, a dance group that toured the world showcasing folkloric dances of Northeastern Brazil.

Artful Teaching and Learning: Integrating the Arts into the Curriculum

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The full-day workshop, facilitated by Patricia Sobral, Senior Lecturer of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies at Brown University, will lead participants through a series of activities combining the performing, visual, and literary arts. Particular attention will be paid to the performing arts as a means of teaching languages. Participants will be given materials and models that can be applied to a number of fields within the college curriculum for students of all levels and ages. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Christopher Dunn.