Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Albert Valdman Lecture: Kapwa ap kenbe djanm - Sociolinguistic Variation in Northern Haiti

March 5th, 2010
3:00 PM

Location
Greenleaf Conference Room
100A Jones Hall
Tulane University

Among French-based creoles, Haitian Creole has the highest degree of standardization, with a written norm—Standard Haitian Creole (SHC)—based on the speech of Port-au-Prince monolingual speakers. For instance, SHC lacks front rounded vowels and postvocalic /r/ and is reaching the rest of the country through the media and schools.

To evaluate the incursion of SHC into the North region, a sociolinguistic study of Northern Haitian Creole (NHC) was conducted in Cape Haitian, Haiti‘€™s second largest city, and surrounding countryside. Besides stereotypes such as the possessive pronoun kin (vs. SHC pa), we found that several NHC features first described in Étienne (1974) are still ubiquitous in the North.

In this presentation, we look at social factors and linguistic conditioning (syntactic and phonological) of three sociolinguistic variables, shedding light on the current vitality and status of NHC features. While the frequently occurring third person singular pronoun seems to have remained below the level of consciousness, the preposition ak ‘€˜with‘€™, which alternates between local ake and standard ak / avè / avèk, appears to be at least a marker, if not a stereotype (Valdman 2008). As for the possessive, which varies between the local form N + a + NP and the standard N + NP, it is pointed out in some speakers‘€™ metalinguistic comments, but its status as a marker or stereotype is unclear.

Using a subset of 24 speakers from the more than 120 in our corpus, we show that regardless of their individual sociolinguistic status, all three variables show a robust preference for NHC features in most syntactic contexts. This study contributes to the growing body of literature applying the tools and methods of variationist sociolinguistics to creole languages, in an effort to assess the effects of the standard on other geographic varieties.

Albert Valdman is the Rudy Professor of French and Linguistics (emeritus) at Indiana University and author of Ann Pale Kreyòl: An Introdcutory Course in Haitian Creole and Haitian Creole – English Bilingual Dictionary. This event is sponsored by the Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

EVENTS

NEWS

MISC / STAND-ALONE

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

Lunch with LAGO featuring Ruben Luciano

View Full Event Description

Join the Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) on Friday, 1/24 at 12pm for the latest installment of our bi-weekly lunch series. Ruben Luciano is a Ph.D. student in the Tulane University History department, specializing in modern Latin American (specifically, Dominican) history, the military under dictatorship, intersectionality, and gender. He also has two Master’s degrees in the Social Sciences and Health Communication. He’ll be speaking on his thesis project, entitled “Queering the Trujillato: Reinterpretations of Loyalty, Criminality, and Homosociality in the Dominican Military from 1930-61.” Afterwards, we’ll open the floor for a Q & A, allowing for further conversation about Ruben’s work, more practical questions about the dissertation research and writing experience, and navigating the grants application process as a Ph.D. student.

The Labyrinth will be serving mini paninis, bagels, savory spreads and dips, desserts (including tres leches cake) and fresh juices. Please come hungry!

Haitian Artists Showcase at Tulane

View Full Event Description

HAITIANOLA and the Stone Center present artists from the Jacmel Arts Center in Jacmel, Haiti. This event will feature live dance as well as a discussion on Haitian art and its connection to New Orleans culture.

Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

View Full Event Description

Saturday, January 25, 2020
9:00 am – 12:30 pm
Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture in the Classroom

This collaborative workshop is designed for middle to high school Social Studies educators to enhance the teaching of the Tunica community while highlighting this group as part of a series of ancient civilizations currently taught at the K-12 level. This workshop is the first one in the series aimed at increasing and extending the current teaching of ancient civilizations in the Americas. The local focus on Louisiana indigenous people and culture will enable educators to create deeper connections when teaching about indigenous identity across the Americas such as the Maya, the Aztec and the Inca.

This workshop will introduce participants with little or no prior knowledge to ancient Tunica history, art, and language, with special focus on the role of food and native foods of this region. Language Instructors Donna Pierite and Elisabeth Pierite Mora of the Tunica-Biloxi Language & Culture Revitalization Program (LCRP) will share the history of the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe beginning in 1541 up to the 1700s when the tribes reached the Avoyelles Prairie. Through story, song and dance they will share the Tunica language and Tunica-Biloxi culture. They will highlight the cultural educational initiatives of LCRP, and provide a list of online resources and samples of pedagogical materials for attendees.

Sponsored by the Middle American Research Institute, S.S. NOLA, and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

This Bridge Called our Backs: Judith F. Baca, Muralism, and Community Engagement

View Full Event Description

A Lecture by Dr. Anna Indych-Lopez
The City University of New York

Monday, February 3, 2020
6:00 PM

Woldenberg Art Center
Room 210

FLAS Summer Fellowship Application Deadline: February 14th, 2020

View Full Event Description

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies receives funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program for Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. FLAS fellowships administered by the Stone Center are available to undergraduate and graduate students for the intensive study over the summer of Kaqchikel Maya, Portuguese, or another less-commonly taught Latin American language. Graduate students wishing to engage in intensive study of such a language are encouraged to apply for one of these fellowships. Only U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply; and only intensive summer language programs that meet the FLAS guidelines will be considered. A listing of some of the approved programs is prepared by CLASP and available on-line. Program information and application packets for Tulane sponsored summer language programs can be found here.

The following FAQs offer further information on the application process and program guidelines for undergraduates and graduates respectively:

Summer FLAS FAQ for Undergraduates
Summer FLAS FAQ for Graduate Students

The Stone Center staff held an on-line information session on Wednesday, January 15, 2020. You can access the video and PowerPoint presentation here: FLAS SUMMER APPLICATION MATERIALS for 2020 All materials are PDF files, forms are in fillable PDF format.

All application materials, including the faculty recommendation form, proposal narrative, and financial need statement or FAFSA EFC, should be submitted electronically by email according to the application guidelines. Please review these guidelines carefully.

For questions regarding the FLAS Fellowship, please contact Dr. Jimmy Huck by email at jhuck@tulane.edu OR Valerie McGinley at vmcgmar@tulane.edu.

Bate Papo! Primavera 2020

View Full Event Description

A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome! Meetings take place on Fridays at different hours and locations. See the full schedule below:

January 17th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de maracuja

January 24th, 3 PM, Boot
Treat: Suco de caju

January 31st, 4PM, Cafe Carmo (527 Julia St.)
Treat: Suco de caja

February 7th, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Agua de coco

February 14th, 11 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Guarana

February 21st, 12PM, PJs Willow
Treat: Cha de maracuja

February 28th, 2PM, Sharp Residence Hall
Treat: Cafe brasiliero

March 6th, 10 AM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Cha matte

March 13th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de goiaba

March 20th, 3 PM, Greenbaum House
Treat: Limonada a brasiliera

March 27th, 12 PM, LBC Mezzanine
Treat: Batido de abacate

April 3rd, 11 AM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Suco de acai

April 17th, 1 PM, LBC Pocket Park
Treat: Caldo de cana

April 24th, 2 PM, Boot
Treat: Groselha