Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Las Américas Film Series: New Films From Latin America

February 19th, 2010 - March 11th, 2010

Location
Zeitgeist Multi-disciplinary Arts Center
1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70113
(504) 352-1150

This series is made possible through the generosity of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University, Las Américas Film Network, John Burton Harter Charitable Trust, and Ceballos Legal Consulting and Immigration Law.

Tulane faculty, staff & students get in free with ID.

For more information, see the Zeitgeist Home.
For movie information and previews, see Las Américas Films.

Series Schedule

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 19 FROM 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.
LAMBI A RELE: A CELEBRATION OF ARTS TO BENEFIT HAITI.
Come immerse yourself in the culture of Haiti. Sample traditional Haitian cuisine and rum punch. There will be Haitian art on display, as well as recent photographs from Haiti for sale. We will also have a silent auction of original works by local artists, a raffle with great prizes from local businesses, live music and more! Contact Lambi.A.Rele@gmail.com for more info. All proceeds from this event will be donated to Yele Haiti for earthquake relief. http://yele.org

FEBRUARY 19 – 24 @ 7:30 p.m.
EL GENERAL by Natalia Almada – (Mexico) – Past and present collide in this extraordinarily crafted film when filmmaker Natalia Almada, winner of the US Directing Award: Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival, brings to life audio recordings she inherited from her grandmother. These recordings feature Alicia Calles‘€™s reminiscences about her own father‘€“Natalia‘€™s great-grandfather‘€“General Plutarco Elías Calles, a revolutionary general who became president of Mexico in 1924. Combining meticulously edited audio, haunting photographs, archival newsreels, and old Hollywood films with an original evocative soundtrack, sweeping footage of modern-day Mexico City, and interviews with today‘€™s working poor. Winner U.S. Directing Award: Documentary at Sundance 2009 and the Cine Las Americas, Audience Award, Best Documentary. 83 minutes

FEBRUARY 19 – 24 @ 9:30 p.m.
TONY MANERO by Pablo Larrain – (Chile) – As Augusto Pinochet holds Chile in the grip of dictatorship, a fifty year old man obsessed with John Travolta‘€™s character from Saturday Night Fever . Raúl Peralta and his friends gather in a small bar and act out their favorite scenes from the film. When the national television announces a Tony Manero impersonating contest it seems he may finally have a shot at living his dreams. But as Raúl and his dancing partners (also underground resistance fighters who rail against the regime) are persecuted by the secret police. Chile’s Official 2008 Academy award entry. Winner Grand Prize and Best actor at the Havana Film Festival and the KNF Director’s Prize Rotterdam Film Festival, 98 minutes

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 5:30 p.m.
LIVERPOOL by Lisandro Alonso – (Argentina) – One of the New Argentine Cinema’s most distinguished directors, has a singular voice that speaks once again in Liverpool. A graceful ode to solitude and the existential need for meaning, this story follows a sailor named Farrel on a lonely journey to the southernmost region of Argentina. After traveling the world, Farrel asks the captain if he can leave the ship to see if his mother still lives in their old village. Alonso’s wide shots of formidable mountain ranges connects Farrel’s gloomy trek through the snow with the dark past that haunts him, creating an engrossing aesthetic that sets the director apart as a master of style and technique. Grand Jury Prize Gijon Int. Film Festival. 84 mins.

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 7:30 p.m.
BIRDWATCHERS by Marcco Bechis – (Brazil) – In Mato Grosso do Sul, in rural Brazil, hordes of tourists come for bird watching. The Guarani-Kaiowá, the indigenous people who really own the land, are confined to a nearby reservation and are paid to stand naked along the shores of the river in face paint to provide thrills for the visitors. Fed up with their officially-imposed financial and spiritual impoverishment, tribal leaders and a local shaman organize a protest. Casting local non- professionals, the director draws out performances that highlight the sharp clash between tyranny and a spiritual and ancient culture connected to nature. 104 minutes

FEBRUARY 26 – MARCH 4 @ 9:30 p.m.
GIGANTE by Adrian Biniez – (Uruguay) – Jara is a shy and lonely 35-year-old security guard at a supermarket on the outskirts of Montevideo. He works the night shift, monitoring the surveillance cameras of the entire building. One night he discovers Julia, a 25-year-old cleaning woman, through one of the cameras. Night after night, he watches her on the cameras while she works. Soon he starts following her after work: to the cinema, the beach and even to a date with another man. Jara’s life becomes a series of routines and rituals around Julia, but eventually he finds himself at a crossroad and must decide whether to give up his obsession or confront it. Winner Best First Feature, Grand Jury Prize and the Alfred Bauer Prize at the Berlin Int. Film Festival. 85 minutes

March 5 & 7 @ 7:30 p.m.
NORA’S WILL by Marciana Chenillo – (Mexico) Before dying, Nora schemes a plan to make José, her ex-husband, take care of her corpse. But she is missing something. For the only flaw in the plan – a mysterious photograph forgotten under the bed- will lead to an unexpected outcome reminding us that the biggest love stories are sometimes hidden in the smallest places. Winner Audience Award Miami Film Festival and Jury Prize and Best First Feature Los Angeles Latino Film Festival. 90 minutes

March 5 & 7 @ 9:30 p.m.
DOS PATRIAS (TWO HOMELANDS, CUBA AND THE NIGHT) by Christian Liffers – (Cuba) Framed by the beautiful poetry of the oppressed Cuban poet Reinaldo Arenas, this revealing documentary features memorable portraits of five gay men and one transsexual woman living in and around Havana. It has been more than ten years since the success of films like Strawberry and Chocolate and Gay Cuba, so Two Homelands provides a fresh and important look at the present-day gay culture and community of an often misunderstood country that is still stuck in the past but also very dynamic and full of surprises. Cuba is the country where they live, but the night is where they thrive. 84 minutes.

March 8 & 9 @ 7:30 p.m.
WHO AM I? (THE FOUND CHILDREN OF ARGENTINA) by Estela Bravo – (Argentina) – What does it feel like to suddenly discover that your parents are not actually your parents, but part of a network of military criminals who murdered your mother and father? The children of Argentina’s disappeared are now young adults struggling with such complex and traumatic discoveries. For three decades, the Plaza de Mayo Grandmothers have searched for their 500 stolen grandchildren, the children of their own children who disappeared in Argentina’s Dirty War. To date, 88 of these missing children have been found and have recovered their true identity. 75 minutes.

March 8 & 9 @ 9:30 p.m.
THE MAN OF TWO HAVANAS by Vivien Weismen Lesnik – (Cuba) – Through the prism of a daughter we explore the past, the present, and the nature of social responsibility and personal sacrifice. The movie contains highly controversial top-secret audiotapes of a CIA trained Cuban exile Terrorist who is in the middle of a trial and incarcerated by Homeland Security. His trial puts the Bush administration’s War on Terror on trial as well. The audiotape excerpts are from an NYT reporter who refuses to turn over these tapes. The never before heard audiotapes will be hotly debated in the media. 93 minutes.

March 10 & 11 @ 7:30 p.m.
THE INHERITORS by Eugenio Polgovsky – (Mexico) – THE INHERITORS immerses us in the daily lives of children who, with their families, survive only by their unrelenting labor. The film takes us into the agricultural fields, where children barely bigger than the buckets they carry, work long hours, in often hazardous conditions, picking tomatoes, peppers, or beans, for which they are paid by weight. This film reveals how the cycle of poverty is passed on, from one generation to another. Grand Prize Festival of New Latin Cinema. 90 minutes.

March 10 & 11 @ 9:30 p.m.
OBLIVION by Heddy Honigmann – (Peru) – Peru’s capital city of Lima, reveals its startling contrasts of wealth and poverty, and how many of its poorest citizens have survived decades of economic crisis, terrorism and government violence, denial of workers’ rights, and political corruption. OBLIVION provides intimate and moving portraits of street musicians, singers, vendors, shoeshine boys, and the gymnasts (some mere children) and jugglers who perform at traffic stops. The film also visits small business owners who although include in the daily interactions of the city‘€™s wealthy, live in near poverty in the city‘€™s slums. Winner International Film Critics Prize and the Silver Dove Award at the Leipzig Documentary Film Festival. 93 minutes.

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LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship

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The Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) is pleased to announce its Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship. This full-day event will include a series of presentations featuring graduate students, faculty, and local leaders working at the intersection of academia and community. All are welcome to attend one or more of three talks. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.


SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

9 – 9:30 AM | Breakfast

9:30 – 11 AM | “The Role of the Arts in Community Engagement and Activism”
Moderator: Megan Flattley (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Jeffery U. Darensbourg (Tribal Councilperson and enrolled member of the Atakapa-Ishak Nation of Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas), Gabrielle Garcia Steib (Media Artist and Writer), Dr. Edith Wolfe (Stone Center Assistant Director for Undergraduate Programs)

11 – 11:30 AM | Break/Networking

11:30 – 1 PM | “Co-Creating Digital Testimonios with Latinx Youth: A Community-Engaged Approach to Scholarship and Action”
Presenters: Jennifer Miller Scarnato (City, Culture & Community PhD Candidate) and Rebeca Sauly Santa María Granados (Youth Member of Puentes)
Discussion Moderator: Dr. James D. Huck, Jr. (Stone Center Assistant Director for Graduate Programs and Puentes Board Member)

1 – 2 PM | Lunch

2 – 3:30 PM | “Guiding Principles and Strategies: The Social Sciences and Community Engagement”
Moderator: Carolina Timoteo de Oliveira (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Claudia Chávez-Arguelles (Tulane Anthropology Faculty), Ruth Idakula (Critical Race Theory & Anti-Racist Praxis educator and facilitator), and Linett Luna Tovar (Stone Center Masters Program Alumna)

3:30 – 4:30 | Networking/Wrap-up

The LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship is co-sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Tulane Mellon Graduate Program in Community-Engaged Scholarship.

Latin American Writers Series: Damián Cabrera

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Join us for an interview with Damián Cabrera about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Damián Cabrera was born in Asunción Paraguay and grew up in Alto Paraná along the Brazilian border. His publications, which explore the realities of the Triple Frontier, include one collection of short stories, sh… horas de contar… (2006) and the novels Xiru (2012)—winner of the Roque Gaona Prize—and Xe (2019). Cabrera has served as editor of the journals El Tereré (2006-2012) and Ku’Ótro (2008) and is an active member of artistic organizations such as Semenario Espacio/Crítico and Ediciones de la Ura. He also teaches film at the Universidad Columbia de Paraguay and art and design at the Universidad Nacional de Paraguay.

The 2020 Dr. H. Barry and Lucy V. Holt Lecture in Ethnohistory: "City of Blood, City of Flowers: Why the Aztecs Enchant Us"

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Tulane Department of History, and the Middle American Research Institute invite you to the 2020 Dr. H. Barry and Lucy V. Holt Lecture in Ethnohistory: “City of Blood, City of Flowers: Why the Aztecs Enchant Us” presented by Dr. Davíd Carrasco.

Davíd Carrasco is the Neil L. Rudenstine Professor of the Study of Latin America at Harvard University. A historian of religions with a particular interest in Mesoamerican cities and the Mexican-American borderlands, Carrasco’s wide-ranging work has explored the challenges of postcolonial ethnography and theory as well as the practices and symbolic nature of ritual violence in comparative perspective. In conjunction with Mexican archaeologists, he has carried out research in excavations and archives associated with the sites of Teotihuacan and Mexico-Tenochtitlan resulting in books such as Religions of Mesoamerica, City of Sacrifice, To Change Place, and Quetzalcoatl and the Irony of Empire. Carrasco’s work has also traced the religious dimensions of the Latino experience, exploring themes such as mestizaje, the myth of Aztlan, transculturation, and La Virgen de Guadalupe. Most recently, Carrasco oversaw production of a documentary about his longtime friend and Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison. He edited and contributed to the companion volume Goodness & the Literary Imagination. Carrasco is a recipient of the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor the Mexican government gives to a foreign national.

The lecture is being held in conjunction with the Tulane Maya Symposium and will be followed by light refreshments before the keynote address by Dorie Reents-Budet. Both the Holt Lecture and keynote address are free and open to the public.

Teaching the Maya through Food: K-12 Teacher Workshop

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Friday, March 6, 2020
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

REGISTER HERE FOR $5 ONLY

In collaboration with the Annual Tulane Maya Symposium, this workshop focuses on foods of the Maya. Participants will explore the foods of the Maya focusing on the role of food over time. Join us as we hear from Maya Master Teacher, Ellen Cohen, Anthropologist and researcher of chocolate, Professor Kathryn Sampeck and Kaqchikel language scholar from Guatemala, Ixnal Cuma Chávez who will discuss the importance of the tortilla and tamal in contemporary Maya traditions.

REGISTER HERE.

Workshop Objectives:

  • Provide a general introduction to the geography of the Maya
  • Introduce new perspectives to teaching the Maya through culinary traditions
  • Share hands-on lessons and activities that inspire learners to better understand ancient and contemporary Maya

Sponsored by Tulane University’s AfterCLASS, the Middle American Research Institute, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and S.S. NOLA.

For more information, please call 504.862.3143 or email crcrts@tulane.edu.

Latin American Writers Series: Andrea Palet

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Join us for an interview with Andrea Palet about her life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Andrea Palet is an editor, columnist, and educator from Chile. With almost three decades of experience in the publishing field, she has edited magazines and books in both Europe and South America. In 2014, she became the founding editorial director of Editorial Laurel in Santiago, Chile. Under her leadership, the house has released the works of more than 20 novelists, essayists, and chroniclers. Palet also oversees the Master of Editing program at the Universidad de Diego Portales. A collection of her columns, Leo y olvido, was released in 2018 by Ediciones Bastante.

Latin American Writers Series: Rodrigo Fuentes

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Join us for an interview with Rodrigo Fuentes about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Rodrigo Fuentes is a Guatemalan-born writer of short stories. He received the II Premio Centroamericano Carátula in 2014, and his collection Trucha Panza arriba was a finalist for the 2018 Premio Gabriel García Márquez . His works have been published in Guatemala, Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, El Salvador, as well as in translation in France and Scotland. Fuentes is also the co-founder and editor of the magazine Suelta and of the digital publishing house and literary journal Traviesa. He currently teaches in the Department of Spanish at College of the Holy Cross.