Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Arts, Media, Culture & Politics in Latin America at Tulane University


Graduate Studies in Arts, Media, Culture, and Politics in Latin America at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies

At Tulane University, you have a unique opportunity to specialize in the arts, humanities, and cultural studies with an area focus on Latin America. Tulane is a Research 1 University with a high concentration of Latin American specialists. The possibility of combining academic strength and engaged learning gives our program a special flavor. The Stone Center offers highly competitive tuition-waivers and stipend support for highly qualified students pursuing M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Latin American Studies. Students engaged in research on the arts, media, and politics are active participants in the intellectual life of the Stone Center and Latin Americanist researchers As a graduate student you will have many opportunities to participate actively in weekly seminars, research projects, and fieldwork activities, as you immerse yourself in an intense academic life led by a community of scholars who are doing cutting-edge research on Latin America.

Our areas of concentration are broad and diverse, but a significant core of Tulane’s Latin Americanist faculty in anthropology, art history, communication, ethnomusicology, film studies, history, literature, and cultural studies share an interest in the examination of the close interconnections among the arts, media, and politics. In fact, over half of the tenured and tenure-track faculty in these departments and fields work on Latin America, where they share a common commitment to rigorous research that advances cross-disciplinary dialogue and generates novel perspectives on wide-ranging cultural and political phenomena.

As a graduate student, you will have the opportunity to work with scholars who are studying topics that include narratives of dislocation, the phenomenology of collectivity, the spatialization of social inequality, entanglements of traditional and experimental creative expressions, and transcontinental movements and connections. Faculty have explored the production and circulation of printed books in the culture, commerce, and administration of the Hispanic monarchy, popular music and political protest, intercultural performance in the context of global exchanges, the reception and impact of television news and telenovelas interpretations of political issues, how festivals, museums, television, and tourism steep musicians’ performances in national-cultural nostalgia, how artworks construct cultural identity as well as notions of time and history, how radiophonic practices impacted the narrative practices of early sound cinema, feminist rereading of autobiographical writings by left-wing militants and revolutionaries, and the political economies of communications industries and infrastructures, among many others.



Faculty in Arts, Media, Culture and Politics

Adrian Anagnost. Ph.D., Chicago. Assistant Professor of Art History. Art, Urbanism, Brazil.

Rebecca Atencio. Ph.D., Wisconsin. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Contemporary Brazilian Literature and Culture, Political Violence and Memory, Gender and Sexuality.

Idelber Avelar. Ph.D., Duke. Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Postdictatorial Culture, Southern Cone and Brazilian Literature and Culture, Identity and Latinamericanism.

Mia Bagneris. Ph.D., Harvard. Associate Professor of Art History. African and African American Studies, History of Art and Visual Culture.

Carolina Caballero. Ph.D., North Carolina. Zemurray-Stone Senior Professor of Practice in Latin American Studies. Contemporary Latin American Literature, Cultural Studies, Cuba.

Hortensia Calvo. Ph.D., Yale. Doris Stone Librarian and Director. Spanish and Spanish American Literary Baroque, Social History of Print.

John Charles. Ph.D., Yale. Associate Professor. Latin American Literature. (?)

Christopher Dunn. Ph.D., Brown. Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Brazil, Cultural Studies, Brazilian Culture, African Diaspora Studies, Popular Music.

Felipe Fernandes Cruz. Ph.D., Texas. Assistant Professor of History. Modern Brazil, History of Technology.

Annie Gibson. Ph.D., Tulane. Administrative Assistant Professor. Director of Study Abroad. Brazil, Cuba, Cultural Studies.

Antonio Daniel Gómez. Ph.D., Pittsburgh. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Argentina, Cuba, Literature of Exile.

Benjamin M. Han. Ph.D., NYU. Assistant Professor of Communication. Cinema and Film Studies. Cross-Cultural Communication, Asia and Latin America.

Yuri Herrera-Gutiérrez. Ph.D., UC Berkeley. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Mexican Cultural Studies and Border Studies.

Laura-Zoe Humphreys. Ph.D., Chicago. Assistant Professor of Communication. Cuban and Latin American Cinema, Critical Social Theory.

Ana López. Ph.D., Iowa. Professor of Communication. Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs, and Director, Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute. Mass Communication, Film, Cultural Studies, Popular Culture.

Megwen Loveless. Ph.D., Harvard. Senior Professor of Practice/Director, Basic Language Program in Portuguese. Brazil, Portuguese Language, Ethnography of Brazilian Music.

Vicki Mayer. Ph.D., UC San Diego. Professor of Communication. Associate Dean for Academic Initiatives and Curriculum. Mexican Americans, Mass Media and Cultural Citizenship.

Sabia McCoy-Torres. Ph.D., Cornell. Assistant Professor. Afro-Diasporic Circum-Caribbean. Race, Gender/Sexuality, Popular Performance.

Marilyn Miller. Ph.D., Oregon. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Colonial literatures of Latin America, Postcolonial Theory, Caribbean and Trans-American studies.

Tatjana Pavlovic. Ph.D., Washington. Professor of Spanish and Portuguese. Film Studies, Feminism, Critical Theory.

Stephanie C. Porras. Ph.D. Courtauld Institute of Art. Assistant Professor. Flemish Artists and the Americas, Mexico and Brazil.

Mauro Pereira Porto. Ph.D., UC San Diego. Associate Professor of Communication. Brazil, Media and Politics.

Carol McMichael Reese. Ph.D., Texas. Professor of Architectural History. Argentina, Mexico, Urban Studies, Architecture and Urbanism in the Americas, 19th and 20th Centuries.

Thomas F. Reese. Ph.D., Yale. Professor of Art History. Executive Director, Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Thomas F. Reese and Carol M. Reese Distinguished Chair in Latin American Studies. Argentina, Mexico, Art/Art History, Area Studies, Latin American and Iberian Art, Architecture and Urbanism.

Ana Sánchez-Rojo. Ph.D., Chicago. Assistant Professor of Music. Historical Musicology, Spanish Colonial Music History, Hispanic Identity.

Daniel Sharp. Ph.D., Texas. Associate Professor of Music. Ethnomusicology, Brazil.

Rachel Stein. Ph.D., Columbia.‘€¯Research & Instruction Librarian. Latin American & Iberian Press and Print Cultures.

Selamawit D. Terrefe. Ph.D., California. Assistant Professor of English. African Diasporic Literature and Visual Culture, Critical Theory.

Edith Wolfe. Ph.D., Texas. Administrative Faculty of Latin American Studies. Assistant Director/Undergraduate Programs. Latin American Art, Modernism in Latin America.

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Upcoming Events

Final Push Fridays: Graduate Research & Writing Support

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Every Friday from 10am-12pm CDT, The Latin American Library and Stone Center are co-hosting a virtual work-along for Latin Americanist graduate students to support each other in their research and writing goals. The Zoom meeting has two break-out options: participants may choose to troubleshoot research and methodological questions with an LAL librarian and/or work towards their writing objectives alongside a community of their peers. We hope you will join us when you can!

Central America, People and the Environment Educator Institute 2021

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This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment.

While at Tulane, the institute will explore the historic connections between the United States and Central America focusing on indigenous communities and environment while highlighting topics of social justice and environmental conservation. Join us to explore Central America and teaching strategies to implement into the classroom.

Additional details and registration will be available in the late fall 2020. For more information, please email dwolteri@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.