Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

2001-2002 Events Archive

August 1st, 2001 - August 1st, 2002

Symposia & Conferences

Brazil Week 2001, September 10-13, 2001

  • Panel on Contemporary Brazilian Politics, September 10, 5:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • The Military Under Collor, Franco, and Cardoso. Jorge Zerverucha
  • Reforms and Elections in Brazil: 1998-2000-2002. David Fleischer
  • Film: The Hour of the Star, directed by Suzana Amaral, September 11, 5:30pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Panel on Culture, Society, and Science in Brazil, September 12, 5:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Science, Nature and Race: A Comparative Analysis of Two Projects sponsored by UNESCO in Brazil (1946-1952), Marcos Chor Maio
  • Gender and Sexuality Among Youth From a Favela in Rio, Simone Monteiro
  • Film: Tudo e Brasil, directed by Rogerio Sganzerla, September 13, 7:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A

Sponsors: Tulane’s Global Village, Newcomb College for Research on Women, Tulane’s History Department, Brazilian Studies Council of Tulane, and Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

The Centenary of the Famous 41: Sexuality and Social Control in Latin America, 1901, November 15-17, 2001

On November 17, 1901, Mexico City police raided a private party, arresting its 41 attendees, all men, many of them dressed as women. The resulting scandal incited an explosion of the nascent discourse on homosexuality in Mexico at a time when, throughout Latin America, decadent modernist poets and naturalist novelists, positivist criminologists and psychiatrists, scandal sheet journalists and illustrators, along with their readers, had become fascinated with issues of sexuality. Schedule

Sponsors: Tulane University’s Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies; Tulane University Center for Scholars; Department of Spanish and Portuguese; Department of History’s Georges Lurcy Fund; Office of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Life; Office of the Provost; The Graduate School; Loyola University Women’s Resource Center and Women’s Studies Committee.

17th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies: Reaching Underserved Trauma Survivors Through Community- Based Programs, December 6-9, 2001

The 2001 Annual Meeting of the ISTSS in New Orleans will focus on reaching underserved trauma survivors through community-based programs. A major aim of the meeting is to feature and encourage collaborations at all levels. This effort will further our scientific and applied knowledge toward the goals of preventing and reducing exposure to traumatic experiences and of improving the lives of trauma survivors worldwide.

The current epidemic of trauma on every continent demands a better understanding of those community-based trauma interventions that are most effective for preventing and ameliorating the impact of traumatic exposure among large groups of survivors. How best to deliver these services, given the context of myriad obstacles that typically confront both trauma survivors and those who attempt to serve them, are important issues that need to be addressed. Such knowledge necessarily comes from collaborations between community-based service providers, researchers, advocates, policymakers, and trauma survivors themselves. The events of September 11th will be highlighted.

The Postcolonial: Literature, Theory in Africa and the African Diaspora, December 7-8, 2001

The First Symposium on the International Human Rights of Women February 22, 2002

The symposium will focus on two important and timely topics: 1) how economic development affects the human rights of women and 2) asylum and immigration law in relation to violations of women’s human rights. Political asylum expert Irena Lieberman, Director of Legal Services for the Tahirih Justice Center, Washington, D.C., will be the keynote speaker for the free symposium. Other speakers include Catherine Lampard, Director of Tulane Law School’s Immigration Law Clinic; Lawrence B. Fabacher II, Senior Partner of Lawrence B. Fabacher II law firm, Professor of Immigration Law at Tulane and Loyola Law Schools; Sue Headlee, Assistant Professor of Economics at American University, Washington, D.C., author of The Cost of Being Female Barbara Major, Executive Director of the St. Thomas Health Clinic, Core Trainer for the People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond in New Orleans; Leslie Snider, Director of the Mental Health and Anthropology Track in the Department of International Health and Development, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; Brooke deMontluzin, Attorney for Catholic Charities Legal/Resettlement Services in New Orleans.

Sponsored by the International Law Society, Human Rights Law Society, and Law Women’s Association of Tulane University Law School.

Mellon Symposium: Harnessing the Cosmic Beat: How the Ancient Maya Wrote & Built What They Saw in the Sky
February 28, 2002, 7:00pm-12:00pm, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium

In this illustrated lecture Anthony Aveni, Visiting Mellon Professor in the Humanities at Tulane, will focus on the contributions of Archaeoastronomy to our understanding of Ancient Maya Culture. His talk brings together evidence from both the written and the unwritten record that attests to the long Maya love affair with the cosmos and the remarkable intellectual achievements that stemmed from it among Mayan astronomers. Innovations detailed in his overview are a mathematical system that used a zero long before their European counterpart and the construction of specialized sacred buildings, with alignments that followed the course of the planet Venus to an accuracy of one day in 500 years. Admission is free of charge. This event is open to the public. For more information, call Public Relations Office at 865-5210. The event is being hosted by: Latin American Studies.

Deciphering & Dating the Madrid Codex, a Pre-Columbian Maya Document
March 1-2, 2002, 8:30am-5:00pm, Diboll Conference Center

This conference, organized by Mellon Visiting Professor of the Humanities, Dr. Anthony Aveni (Anthropology) and Tulane Anthropology Tulane Ph.D. graduate, Gabrielle Vail. Papers will deal with such topics as: how the structure of Pre-Columbian almanacs marks important ritual events and offers prognostications; parallel or cognate almanacs from other parts of Mesoamerica: similarities between Maya and central Mexican “books”, and advances in reading the enigmatic Maya hieroglyphic texts. Schedule

Sponsored by the Tulane’s Department of Anthropology and Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

7th Annual Tulane Environmental Law Conference: Environment 2002 Law, Science and the Public Interest
March 8 & 9, 2002, 6329 Freret Street, Tulane Law School

This conference brings academic, practical and popular perspectives to current issues including human rights and environmental justice, environmental crimes, urban environmental policy, energy conservation, and water law and coastal issues. Schedule

Sponsored by the Tulane Environmental Law Society, the Tulane Institute for Environmental Law and Policy, and the Tulane Center for Ethics in Public Administration.

Performances of the Caribbean Symposium, March 13 &14, 2002

Speakers and performers consider performances as act, masquerade and intervention and address how it communicates social and religious values, elicits identification and forges a sense of community in the Caribbean and the Caribbean Diaspora. Schedule

Sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane
University.

First International Congress of the Bolivian Studies Association, March 14-16, 2002

Topics include globalization, postnationalism, neoregionalism, Indigenous movement, Colonial Studies, politics of race, gender and ethnicity, cultural politics in educational reforms, indigneismo, genre studies in literature, cultural theory, popular culture (film, music, radio, television), urban and environmental studies, linguistics, architecture, photography, and any aspect of natural history and biomedical sciences. Bolivianists include: Jesús Urzagasti, Xavier Albo, Ana Rebeca Prada, Elizabeth Monasterios, Mario Miranda Pacheco, Zues Tapia, Edmundo Paz-Soldán, Hugo Pope, Marcia Stephenson, Kevin Healey, Guillermo Delgado, Carlos Arrien.
Schedule

Title VIA Meeting: Cultural Heritage and Preservation – Challenges in the New Millennium, March 26, 2002

Reclaiming the Spirits: Art and Healing in Haitian Vodou, April 3, 2002

Spirituality and Healing in Haitian Vodou, Margaret Armand, 5:00-6:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Those wandering spirits in Edouard Duval Carrie’s Art Work, Edourd Duval Carrie, 6:00-7:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Generously sponsored by the GRADUATE SCHOOL STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (GSSA), Committee on Visual Culture, Newcomb Art Gallery, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Program in Africa and Diaspora Studies

5th Annual Cultural Encounters Conference: Identities, Borders and Gender, April 4-6, 2002

This conference will explore issues of identity, borders, and gender in all areas and periods of Latin American culture, society, politics, language and literature in both Latin America and the U.S. Schedule

First Annual Tulane Maya Symposium and Workshop: Archaeology, Astronomy, and Texts from the Northern Maya Lowlands, November 1-3, 2002
Join archaeologists and epigraphers at Tulane University in New Orleans for an in-depth exploration of current excavations and decipherments from the Yucatan Peninsula. Saturday, November 2nd will feature a series of lectures on topics ranging from astronomy in the Maya codices, new discoveries at Mayapán, and astronomical orientations in site planning and architecture.

Seminar & Film Series

Embracing the Market: Origins and Consequences of Latin America’s Economic Reforms Guest Seminar Series, Spring 2002

Ethnobotany Luncheon Series, Fall 2001

Faculty Luncheon Seminar Series, September 2001-April 2002
Monthly presentations of Latin American Studies faculty members‘€™ research.

  • Elizabeth Boone, Chair of the Latin American Studies Art History Department; Bill Balee, Anthropology Department, September 24
  • James D. Huck, Latin American Studies Department; Duncan Irschick, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, October 29
  • Carlos Augusto Santos Neves, Brazilian Consul General, Houston, February 25

LARC Fall Film Series, Fall 2001

The detailed listing of the films for this series is included under professional development below. Although designed for teachers, faculty, and TA’s, students are welcome to attend.

Latin Americanist Book Club, Fall 2001

  • Breath, Eyes, Memory, Edwidge Danticat. November 9, 5:00 – 7:00pm, Jones Hall Patio
  • The War of Don Emmanuel’s Nether Parts, Louis de Bernieres. December 14, 2001, 5:00 – 7:00pm, Jones Hall Patio

Latin American Library Instruction Seminar Series, Fall 2001

Bibliographic Instruction. Paul Bary, 4th floor, Howard Tilton Library, October 5, 12:00pm, October 10, 2:00pm, October 24, 3:00pm, November 2, 11:00am, November 8, 12:00pm, November 15, 12:00pm

Latin American Political Economy’s Embracing the Market: Origins and Consequences of Latin America’s Economic Reforms Guest Lecture Series
Spring 2002

  • The Hegemony of U.S. Economic Doctrines in Latin America, Paul Drake, Dean of Division of Social Sciences, Professor of Political Science, University of California, San Diego. March 18, 10:30am-12:00pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Post-Traumatic Texts as Therapeutic Events, Randy Fertel, Independent Scholar, April 11th, 5:15pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A
  • Remembrance and Forgetting of Brazil’s Dirty War, Anthony Pereira, Political Science, Tulane University, April 23, 5:15pm, Greenleaf Conference Room, Jones Hall 100A

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Center for Scholars, the Murphy Institute of Political Economy.

Latin American Studies Film Series, Spring 2002

Latin Divas: A Film Series, Spring 2002

Newcomb Colloquium in the Visual Arts, Fall 2001

Rare Footage: Women Through the Global Lens Film Series, Fall 2001

  • La Boda. Directed by Hannah Weyer (2000), Sponsored by Newcomb Center for Research on Women, November 19, 7:00-9:30pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center
  • Performing the Border. Directed by Ursula Biemann (1999), Sponsored by Newcomb Center for Research on Women, November 19, 9:30-12:00pm, Freeman Auditorium, Woldenberg Art Center

Searching for Identity in Latin American Film Series, Fall 2001

Trauma, Memory and Human Rights, Spring 2002

Working in Emergency and Disaster Settings, Spring 2002
  • Working with the Military in Emergency and Disaster Settings. Lieutenant Colonel Ferdinand Irizarry, Chief of Civil Affairs/Civil-Military Operations Division, US Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School; and Nancy Mock, DrPH, Professor, Complex Emergency and Disaster Management Program, Department of International Health and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, March 10, 9:00am-5:00pm, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tidewater Building, 1440 Canal Street, Room 1210
  • Personal Security in Emergency and Disaster Settings. Robert MacPherson, Director of the Security and Protection Group, CARE, March 18, 3:00-6:00pm, School of Public Heath and Tropical Medicine, Tidewater Building, 1441 Canal Street, Room 1201

Sponsored by the Tulane Payson Center for International Development and Technology Transfer, and the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM), Department of International Health and Development, Complex Emergency and Disaster Management Program.

Student Events

Lectures

Distinguished Visitors & Special Events

Professional Development

Performances & Exhibits

LATEST SITE UPDATES

PEOPLE

NEWS

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MISC / STAND-ALONE

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Upcoming Events

Storytelling in the Language Classroom K-12 Educator Workshop

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This online workshop focuses on books for the Spanish language classroom and highlights interdisciplinary connections for the language, arts and science classrooms. Increase the diversity of books in your school library with these stories from Latin America.

Registration closes on February 12, 2021.

The pandemic this past year has challenged educators in unimaginable ways. Learning environments have been reinvented as teachers constantly struggle to connect with students in meaningful ways. This presentation shows how storytelling can create learning environments that nurture as well as educate.

Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of education, entertainment, and cultural preservation. Given its natural and universal appeal, storytelling can be particularly valuable as an instructional strategy in the language classroom. Attendees will learn how to harness the benefits of storytelling, from creating a more nurturing learning environment that encourages active participation to increasing verbal proficiency among all students.

The presenter, an award-winning children’s books author and teacher, will provide examples from her own books and classroom.

Registration is $10 and includes a copy of a book presented, ready-made lessons to introduce into your teaching, and a certificate of completion. Confirmation of your registration will be sent via email within 2 days to provide access to the Zoom Workshop. Space is limited.

REGISTER TODAY TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT! Deadline to register is February 12, 2021

Sponsored by Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Pebbles Center in partnership with the New Orleans Public Library.

For more information, please call 504.865.5164 or email crcrts@tulane.edu.

Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality Exhibit K-12 Educator Orientation

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REGISTER HERE

Join us for an evening with Tom Friel, Coordinator for Interpretation and Public Engagement as he walks through an innovative tool developed to share the Newcomb Art Museum’s latest exhibit, Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality. The program is designed to introduce K-12 educators to Laura Anderson Barbata’s work and focus on specific elements of the exhibit that connect deeply to the K-12 classroom. While the exhibit is open to limited public access, it plans to open to the public and school visits by Fall 2021. Educators from across the country will find this online introduction to Barbata’s work a valuable resource as the virtual exhibit serves as a unique tool for online learning.

Read more about this exhibit from the Newcomb Gallery of Art About the Exhibit page below:

“The process-driven conceptual practices of artist Laura Anderson Barbata (b. 1958, Mexico City, Mexico) engage a wide variety of platforms and geographies. Centered on issues of cultural diversity, ethnography, and sustainability, her work blends political activism, street theater, traditional techniques, and arts education. Since the early 1990s, she has initiated projects with people living in the Amazon of Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Norway, and New York. The results from these collaborations range from public processional performances, artist books and handmade paper, textiles, countless garments, and the repatriation of an exploited 19thcentury Mexican woman ‘€” each designed to bring public attention to issues of civil, indigenous, and environmental rights.

In Transcommunality, work from five of Barbata‘€™s previous collaborations across the Americas are presented together for the first time. Though varying in process, tradition, and message, each of these projects emphasize Barbata‘€™s understanding of art as a system of shared practical actions that has the capacity to increase connection. The majority of the works presented are costumed sculptures typically worn by stilt-dancing communities. Through the design and presentation of these sculptures, Barbata fosters a social exchange that activates stilt-dancing‘€™s improvisational magic and world history. At the core of this creative practice is the concept of reciprocity: the balanced exchange of ideas and knowledge.

The events of this past year ‘€” from the uprisings across the country in response to fatal police shootings to the disproportionate impacts of Covid-19 among Black and brown communities to the bitter divisiveness of the 2020 presidential election ‘€” have renewed the urgency for Barbata‘€™s multifaceted practice. In featured projects such as Intervention: Indigo, participants from various backgrounds reckon with the past to address systemic violence and human rights abuses, calling attention to specific instances of social justice. In The Repatriation of Julia Pastrana, Barbata‘€™s efforts critically shift the narratives of human worth and cultural memory. The paper and mask works presented in the show demonstrate the impact of individual and community reciprocity, both intentional and organic. Through her performance partnerships in Trinidad and Tobago, New York, and Oaxaca, represented throughout the museum, onlookers are invited to connect to the traditions of West Africa, the Amazon, Mexico, and the Caribbean and the narratives these costume sculptures reflect on the environment, indigenous cultures, folklore, and religious cosmologies.

By encouraging diverse collaborators to resist homogenization and deploy the creative skills inherent to authentic local expressions and their survival, Barbata promotes the revival of intangible cultural heritage. Transcommunality horizontally values the systems of oral history and folklore, spirituality, and interdisciplinary academic thought that shape Barbata‘€™s engaging creations, celebrating the dignity, creativity, and vibrancy of the human spirit.”

REGISTER HERE

An Evening with Multi-Award Winning Author Elizabeth Acevedo

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REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM WEBINAR HERE.

Join us for an evening with Elizabeth Acevedo. Acevedo presents her third book, Clap When You Land, and discusses her writing process and performance background. The discussion will be followed by a reading.

Poet, novelist, and National Poetry Slam Champion, Elizabeth Acevedo was born and raised in New York City, the only daughter of Dominican immigrants. She is the author of Clap When You Land, (Quill Tree Books, 2020); With the Fire On High, (Harper, 2019); the New York Times best-selling and award-winning novel, The Poet X. (HarperCollins, 2018), winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Adult Fiction, the 2019 Michael L. Printz Award, and the Carnegie Medal; and the poetry chapbook Beastgirl & Other Origin Myths. (YesYes Books, 2016), a collection of folkloric poems centered on the historical, mythological, gendered and geographic experiences of a first-generation American woman. From the border in the Dominican Republic, to the bustling streets of New York City, Acevedo’s writing celebrates a rich cultural heritage from the island, inherited and adapted by its diaspora, while at the same time rages against its colonial legacies of oppression and exploitation. The beauty and power of much of her work lies at the tensioned crossroads of these competing, yet complementary, desires.

This online program is free and open to the public. It is part of our ongoing series of public engagement programs with Latinx writers that explore Latin America, race, and identity. Read more about Acevedo’s work in this recent article from The Atlantic.

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Newcomb Institute.

REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM WEBINAR HERE.

For more information, please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.

Global Read Webinar Series Spring 2021

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies coordinates the annual CLASP Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature and is excited to collaborate with other world area book awards on this exciting online program. Join us this spring 2021 as we invite award winning authors to join us in an online conversation about social justice, the writing process and an exploration of culture and identity across world regions. This annual Global Read Webinar series invites readers of all ages to join us as we explore books for the K-12 classroom recognized by world area book awards such as the Africana Book Award, the Américas Award, the Freeman Book Award, the Middle East Outreach Council Book Award, and the South Asia Book Award.

Each webinar features a presentation by an award-winning author with discussion on how to incorporate multicultural literature into the classroom. Be sure to join the conversation with our webinar hashtag #2021ReadingAcrossCultures.

REGISTER FOR THE SERIES HERE

SPRING 2021 SCHEDULE – Read more about the program here.
All webinars are at 7:00 PM EST.

  • January 12 – The Américas Award highlights the 2020 Honor Book, The Moon Within by Aida Salazar
  • February 3 – The Children’s Africana Book Award highlights the 2020 book award winning, Hector by Adrienne Wright
  • March 11 – The Middle East Outreach Award presents 2020 Picture Book award winner, Salma the Syrian Chef by Danny Ramadan, illustrated by Anna Bron
  • April – Freeman Book Award, a project of the National Consortium for Teaching Asia will present a book TBD.
  • May 13 – South Asia Book Award presents The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani

REGISTER FOR THE SERIES HERE

All sessions are free and open to the public. All times listed refer to Eastern Standard Time (EST). Sponsored by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, the South Asia National Outreach Consortium, the Middle East Outreach Council, and African Studies Outreach Council, The National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.

Reading Latina Voices Online Book Group for High School Educators

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This spring 2021 we invite all K-12 educators to join us once a month in an online book group. This past year has been a challenging one for everyone but especially K-12 educators. Sign up and join us as we explore the stories of women confronting identity as Latinas in the United States. Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, AfterCLASS and the New Orleans Public Library partner to host this online book group. The books selected are recognized by the Américas Award and focus on the Latina experience. The group begins with the work of award-winning author and poet, Elizabeth Acevedo who will speak in a unique online format on March 23rd presented by Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and Newcomb Institute.

You have the option of registering in two methods:

  • A) $15 includes your own complete set of books for the series mailed to your home;
  • B) Free – you find your own copies of the books at your local library.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS JANUARY 29, 2021

Reading Schedule – Thursdays at 6:00 PM CST

  • February 11 – Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • March 18 – The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo
  • April 15 – American Street by Ibi Zoboi
  • May 13 – The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano by Sonia Manzano

Sponsored by AfterCLASS and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the New Orleans Public Library.

Central America, People and the Environment Educator Institute 2021

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This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment.

While at Tulane, the institute will explore the historic connections between the United States and Central America focusing on indigenous communities and environment while highlighting topics of social justice and environmental conservation. Join us to explore Central America and teaching strategies to implement into the classroom.

Additional details and registration will be available in the early spring 2021. For more information, please email dwolteri@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.