Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Faculty Bookshelf: Recent Publications

Visit the Alumni Bookshelf

ROSANNE ADDERLEY
New Negroes from Africa: Culture and Community Among Free African Immigrants in the Nineteenth-Century Caribbean (2006)

E. WYLLYS ANDREWS, V
Copán: The History of An Ancient Maya Kingdom (2005)

IDELBER AVELAR
The Letter of Violence: Essays on Narrative, Ethics, and Politics (2004)

The Untimely Present: Postdictatorial Latin American Fiction and the Task of Mourning (1999)

WILLIAM BALEE
Time and Complexity in Historical Ecology: Studies in the Neotropical Lowlands (Editor with C. L. Erickson, 2006)

LAURA BASS
The Drama of the Portrait: Theater and Visual Culture in Early Modern Spain (2008)

Approaches to Teaching Early Modern Spanish Drama (Editor with with Margaret R. Greer, 2005)

FLORENCIA BAZZANO-NELSON
Liliana Porter and the Art of Simulation (2008)

ELIZABETH BOONE
Cycles of Time and Meaning in the Mexican Books of Fate (2007)

MARCELLO CANUTO
Understanding Early Classic Copan (Editor with Ellen E. Bell and Robert J. Sharer, 2004)

MARY CLARK
Gradual Economic Reform in Latin America: The Costa Rican Experience (2001)

GAURAV DESAI
Subject to Colonialism: African Self-Fashioning and the Colonial Library (2001)

GAURAV DESAI & SUPRIYA NAIR
Postcolonialisms: An Anthology of Cultural Theory and Criticism (Editors, 2005)

CHRIS DUNN
Brutality Garden: Tropicalia and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture (2001)

Brazilian Popular Music and Globalization (Editor with Charles Perrone, 2001)

ROBERT HILL & JUDITH MAXWELL
Kaqchikel Chronicles (2006)

OLIVER HOUCK
Taking Back Eden: Eight Environmental Cases That Changed The World (2009)

Down on the Batture (2010)

JAMES D. HUCK, JR.
Mexico: A Global Studies Handbook (2008)

MARTHA HUGGINS
Women Fielding Danger: Negotiating Ethnographic Identities in Field Research (Editor with Marie-Louise Glebbeek, 2008)

Violence Workers: Brazilian Torturers and Murderers Reconstruct Atrocities (2002)

PAUL LEWIS
Latin Fascist Elites: The Mussolini, Franco, And Salazar Regimes (2002)

Guerrillas and Generals: The “Dirty War” in Argentina (2002)

JANA LIPMAN
Guantánamo: A Working-Class History between Empire and Revolution (2008)

NORA LUSTIG
The Microeconomics of Income Distribution Dynamics in East Asia and Latin America (Editor with Francois Bourguignon and Francisco Ferreira, 2005)

Declining Inequality in Latin America: A Decade of Progress? (Editor with Luis F. López-Calva, 2010)

COLIN MacLACHLAN
Mexicans in Revolution, 1910-1946 (With William H. Beezley, 2009)

Argentina: What Went Wrong (2006)

El Gran Pueblo: A History of Greater Mexico. 3rd ed. (With William H. Beezley, 2004)

A History of Modern Brazil: The Past Against the Future (2003)

JUDITH MAXWELL
¿La ütz awäch?: Introduction to Kaqchikel Maya Language (With R. McKenna Brown and Walter E. Little, 2006)

VICKI MAYER
Producing Dreams, Consuming Youth: Mexican Americans and Mass Media (2003)

MARILYN MILLER
Rise and Fall of the Cosmic Race: The Cult of Mestizaje in Latin America (2003)

TATJANA PAVLOVIC
100 Years of Spanish Cinema (2008)

MAURO PORTO
Televisão e política no Brasil: a Rede Globo e as interpretações da audiência (2007)

MAUREEN SHEA
Culture and Customs of Guatemala (2000)

G. EDUARDO SILVA
Challenging Neoliberalism in Latin America (2009)

RAYMOND TARAS
Understanding Ethnic Conflict: Domestic and International Dimensions. 4th ed. (With Rajat Ganguly, 2006)

Liberal and Illiberal Nationalisms (2002)

JUSTIN WOLFE
The Everyday Nation-State: Community, Ethnicity and Nation in Nineteenth-Century Nicaragua (2007)

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Upcoming Events

Life without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay

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Join the Environmental Studies Program and the School of Liberal Arts at Tulane University in welcoming Daniel Renfrew, West Virginia University, who will giving a talk titled Life without Lead: Contamination, Crisis, and Hope in Uruguay on Thursday, February 21 at 5:00 PM in the Stone Auditorium as part of the EVST Focus on the Environment (FOTE) Speaker Series.

Life without Lead examines the social, political and environmental dimensions of a devastating lead poisoning epidemic. Drawing from a political ecology of health perspective, Daniel Renfrew situates the Uruguayan lead contamination crisis in relation to neoliberal reform, globalization, and the resurgence of the political Left in Latin America. He traces the rise of an environmental social justice movement and the local and transnational circulation of environmental ideologies and contested science. Through fine-grained ethnographic analysis, this book shows how combating contamination intersected with class politics, explores the relationship of lead poisoning to poverty, and debates the best way to identify and manage an unprecedented local environmental health problem.

Daniel Renfrew is an associate professor of Anthropology. He received a Ph.D. in anthropology from Binghamton University, State University of New York in 2007. Dr. Renfrew joined the WVU faculty in Fall 2008 after a year as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Towson University. Dr. Renfrew’s research interests span the environmental, urban, critical medical and political anthropology sub-fields, and his research draws from and contributes to interdisciplinary scholarship on political ecology, social movements, science and technology studies, and Latin American studies. His research has focused in particular on anthropological and political ecological analyses of environmental conflicts.

In Celebration of Black History Month and Carnaval: African and indigenous presence in Boricua culture

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In celebration of Black History Month, the New Orleans Jazz Museum is proud to kick off Mardi Gras Mambo with a lecture by curatorial assistant Ilyanette M. Bernabel entitled Carnaval: The African and Indigenous Presence in Boricua Culture on Friday, February 22, 2019, 2:00 – 3:00 PM. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Bernabel will be presenting the research of her exhibition Carnival in Puerto Rico: Connections to the Homeland. The exhibition explores carnival traditions in Puerto Rico and its connection to Africa. This lecture will focus on the Carnival masked characters called Vejigantes, their unique cultural history from Spain to the Caribbean island, and the infamous musical and dance styles of bomba y plena. The goal of the lecture is to bring awareness to the similarities of two cultures as they relate to the spiritual aspect of masking.

The lecture will be followed by a performance from The Bombazo Dance Company.

Photo: Vejigante mask (made out of coconut and branches) worn for Carnival in Loiza, Puerto Rico.

CIPR Speaker Series Critical Issues in Democractic Governance welcomes Sara Niedzwiecki

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Join the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Sara Niedzwieckia as part of the spring speaker series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance, on Friday, February 22, in 110A Jones Hall. Dr. Niedzwiecki will give a talk entitled Uneven Social Policies: The Politics of Subnational Variation in Latin America. Social policies can transform the lives of the poor and marginalized, yet implementation often limits their access. By examining variation in political motivations, state capacity, and policy legacies, it explains why some social policies are implemented more effectively than others, why some deliver votes to incumbent governments while others do not, and why regionally elected executives block the implementation of some but not all national policies. This analysis combines case studies with statistical analysis of conditional cash transfers and health policies in Argentina and Brazil.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Dr. Niedzwiecki is an assistant professor of Politics at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (2014). Her research focuses on comparative welfare states, multilevel governance, and Latin America. She is interested in the process through which social policies are formed and implemented in Latin America and beyond. Additionally, she studies the territorial structure of government, with an emphasis on the measurement of the authority of regional governments across countries.

Dr. Niedzwiecki’s forthcoming book examines the conditions under which social policies are successfully implemented in decentralized countries. More specifically, she examines how politics and capacity at state and local levels shape the implementation of healthcare and Conditional Cash Transfers. It draws from extensive fieldwork conducted in Brazil and Argentina.

David Smilde to join TULASO and debate team to discuss Venezuelan politics and US involvement

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Tulane Undergraduate Latin American Studies Organization (TULASO) and the Tulane Debate Team are proud to present a debate on the recent political crisis in Venezuela on Tuesday, February 26th at 8:00 PM in Jones 102. Professor David Smilde, the Charles A. And Leo M. Favrot Professor of Human Relations and a Senior Fellow for the Washington Office on Latin America, will be participating in the event. Professor Smilde will be providing his expertise to give a background on Venezuelan internal politics while the debate will focus on U.S. involvement in Venezuela.

All are welcome to come view and learn from the debate as well as enjoy some delicious Latin American food.

Email Sofia Zemser at szemser@tulane.edu for additional information.

Follow TULASO on Facebook and Instagram (@tulanetulaso) to stay up to date on upcoming events.

Exiles within Exiles: The Extraordinary Life of Herbert Daniel, Gay Brazilian Revolutionary

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Join us in welcoming James N. Green for a talk entitled Exiles within Exiles: The Extraordinary Life of Herbert Daniel, Gay Brazilian Revolutionary on Wednesday, February 27, at 4:00 PM in Jones Hall 100A.

The talk is free and open to the public. For more information, please contact Christopher Dunn.

James N. Green is the Carlos Manuel de Cespedes Professor of Modern Latin American History and Portuguese and Brazilian Studies Director of the Brazil Initiative at Brown University. He received his doctorate in Latin American history, with a specialization in Brazil, at UCLA in 1996. He has traveled extensively throughout Latin America and lived eight years in Brazil. He served as the Director of the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Brown University from 2005 to 2008. He is a past president of the Brazilian Studies Association (BRASA) and served as the President of the New England Council on Latin American Studies (NECLAS) in 2008 and 2009. He is currently the Director of Brown’s Brazil Initiative; the Executive Director of the Brazilian Studies Association, housed at Brown; and the Director of the Opening the Archives Project.

The event is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and the Department of History.

Critical Issues in Democratic Governance: Spring 2019 CIPR Series

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Latin America faces major threats to democratic governance, but there are also new opportunities for grassroots mobilization and social policy expansion. In Critical Issues in Democratic Governance the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research will host speakers to discuss emerging issues that have surfaced in democratic governance in the region. In Brazil, the AIDS movement constructed a powerful new advocacy coalition, with coordination between bureaucrats and activities. In Argentina and Brazil, there are sharp contrasts in the social welfare policies that governors and mayors have implemented, with profound consequences for livelihood of the poor and marginalized. Finally, the outbreak of violence across Latin America, under democratic regimes raises questions about how criminal organizations compete for influence over transnational illicit networks and infiltrate the state.

Spring 2019 Schedule

February 8, 2019
State-Sponsored Activism: Bureaucrats and Social Movements in Democratic Brazil
Jessica Rich, Marquette University

February 22, 2019
4:00 – 6:00 PM
Greenleaf Conference Room in Jones 100A
Uneven Social Policies: The Politics of Subnational Variation in Latin America
Sara Niedzwiecki, University of California, Santa Cruz

April 5, 2019
Homicidal Ecologies: Illicit Economies and Complicit States in Latin America
Deborah Yashar, Princeton University

Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.