Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Stone Center Policies & Procedures

One of our most important challenges as an interdisciplinary Center is to allow scholars from different disciplines at different levels with different academic goals and professional backgrounds to achieve a common purpose. The following policies and procedures have been created to facilitate this cooperation by allowing faculty, staff, and students to more easily navigate through our common professional and academic environment.

General Guidelines for Center Facilities and Equipment

Main Office

The Stone Center is open from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Guidelines for use by staff and student workers are as follows:

  • Student workers arrange their schedules with the Assistant Director of Administration.
  • In the office environment student workers are expected to wear professional attire. We discourage the use of cell phones in the office.
  • Phone messages should include the date, time and signature of message taker.
  • Work areas must be kept neat and projects put away at the end of the day.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • If you are unable to report to work, please call your supervisor immediately.
  • Persons requesting appointments with the Executive Director should be referred to the Assistant Director of Administration, who maintains his calendar.
  • The Administrative Secretary keeps an inventory of office supplies, stationery, etc. Please notify her if you are using the last item or when supplies are low.
  • Center’s stationery is for official Stone Center business only. The standard Center format is to use 12pt. Arial font, and set top margin at 1.25”, bottom margin at 1”, left margin at 2” and right margin at .75.”
  • Students/TAs may receive faxes but may not use Center phones for long distance calls or to send faxes.
  • Reserve class readings are located in the reception area. Students should follow their professor’s guidelines for checking out readings. We do not make copies here.
  • The Center has a plan in effect for safeguarding our property during hurricane season. The president’s office will announce when the University will close – this information can be obtained by calling the Tulane Alert Line 862-8080 or 1-877-662-8000.
  • The last person out of the main office is responsible for securing both locks.

Greenleaf Conference Room (Jones Hall 100A) Guidelines

  • In order to reserve the Greenleaf Conference Room you must first contact the Stone Center Administrative Secretary. After confirming that the room is available on the date requested, you must come into the Stone Center to fill out the appropriate paperwork to officially reserve the date.
  • The conference room is a ‘€œsmart‘€ classroom. It has built-in video, DVD, and computer (Internet, PowerPoint, etc.) and projection capabilities.
  • Other Audiovisual equipment (overhead projector, slide projector) is available but must be reserved at least five days before the event (form available from the Stone Center’s Administrative Secretary).
  • Prior authorization is required for use of all Conference Room equipment.
  • Conference room will be available one half-hour prior to the event.
  • A university faculty or staff member needs to be present during the event at all times.
  • Functions are usually held during regular business hours (8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.) unless otherwise arranged.
  • University Security is needed when alcoholic beverages are served, when attendance is over 20 people, or when events are held after dark. The sponsoring department is responsible for contacting and paying for University Security.
  • Conference room key should be left on the table in the Conference room after end of event. The door locks automatically.
  • The Stone Center staff does not provide event support (this includes setting up equipment.) Facilities Services should be contacted for additional setup.
  • Sponsoring Department is responsible for returning Conference Room to its original condition. Please place all trash in the dumpster located in the back of the building (in front of the UC).
  • Priority use will be given to Stone Center events, committees, core seminars, official student organizations, associated institutes, councils and affiliated faculty. We do not generally make the Conference Room available for classes, which remove the room from service for other special events for the entire semester.

Stone Center Lounge (Jones Hall 101) Guidelines

This space plays an important role for Undergraduate and Graduate Students in Latin American Studies. It is a place of information (bulletin boards and mailboxes), congregation (tables and coffee), and sustenance (food). Informal meetings are frequently held there. This room is open 8:30 to 5:00 work days and by special arrangement.

  • Center staff empties the refrigerator on Friday evenings; we do not save left over food, containers, etc.
  • If you need to post a notice on the bulletin boards, please see the Administrative Secretary. Do not post notices on walls or doors.

Stone Center Teaching Assistant‘€™s Office (Jones Hall 103-D) Guidelines

Each year a group of doctoral candidates in Latin American Studies teach over 180 undergraduates. They share an office in Jones Hall 103-D, where they prepare courses and meet with students. The Stone Center has adopted a number of guidelines about the use of the room because so many individuals with distinct preferences and work habits share it.

  • The TA‘€™s office should never be left open.
  • If you have a problem with the computer, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ can assist in solving most software related problems. If the ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.
  • The Administrative Secretary keeps an inventory of office supplies, stationery, etc.
  • TA‘€™s may receive faxes but may not use Center phones for long distance calls or to send faxes.
  • Work areas must be kept neat and projects put away at the end of the day.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • Do not use walls and doors to post notices; a bulletin board is provided.
  • The TA office is for the exclusive use of Teaching Assistants for Latin American Studies courses.

George H. Norton Latin American Studies Graduate Student Lounge (Jones Hall 107) Guidelines

In 1999, graduate students requested that the Stone Center try to provide space for them to congregate in or near Jones Hall. We were able to secure permission to renovate one unassigned space, Jones Hall 107. The George H. Norton Graduate Student Lounge (named for the donor whose son received a Masters in Latin American Studies from Tulane in 1991) is accessible 24 hours a day – 7 days a week to all graduate students in the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. The lounge is equipped with workspace, a computer with Internet connection, telephone (865-5174), chalkboard, bulletin boards, sofas, and chairs for relaxation and meetings.

  • You may pick up your key from the Administrative Secretary and will be responsible for returning key to her at the end of school year. Keys are non-transferable and cannot be duplicated. Lost keys may be replaced for a $5.00 fee.
  • To ensure student safety, doors should never be left unlocked. The building is usually open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. If you find that you can‘€™t get in the building, please contact the Department of Public Safety at x5381.
  • In case of emergency (after hours), please contact the Department of Public Safety at x5200.
  • Please avoid food and drinks while working at the computer.
  • The telephone can only be used for local calls, unless you are making a collect or credit card call.
  • The George N. Norton Graduate Student Lounge should only be used by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies students. Consult the Assistant Director of Administration in case of special situations.
  • If you have a problem with the computer, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ can assist in solving most software related problems. If the ‘€œHelp Desk‘€ determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.
  • The Center will supply two black ink printer cartridges and four reams (4 packs of 500 pages each) of paper per month for the computer and printer. Please see the administrative secretary for supplies. Given these fixed monthly limits please be judicious in your use of these supplies and considerate of the usage needs of your fellow graduate students.

Equipment

Stone Center Copier, Computers, Fax Machine, Typewriter, Phone System, the copier, computers, printers, fax and typewriter are for the use of the Stone Center staff. Consult the Assistant Director of Administration in case of emergencies that require their use by non-Center staff.

TA Copy/Scanner Privileges Guidelines

The Center recognizes that TAs represent the most important “teaching” constituency of its undergraduate academic program. The Center also recognizes that it is necessary to make copies of exams and quizzes and that, at times, having handouts for classes is central to successful teaching. There are various ways to do this, including copying and, when possible, posting them ahead of time on-line as electronic files. The easiest and most environmentally friendly method is the latter: post documents on Blackboard and have the students print them themselves. This allows you to upload handouts and documents from wherever you‘€™re working and spares you a trip to the Center. For non-original documents (articles) we now have a high-speed scanner that allows you to convert Xeroxed articles into electronic files and upload them to Blackboard. You can also submit articles to the library to post on Electronic Reserves. Considering these options, your last resort should be Xeroxing. Post assignments whenever possible.

Scanner

The scanner is located in Jones 103, the TAs office. Because it only accepts single sheets of paper (not books or magazines) you need to Xerox materials first. You can then e-mail them to yourself from the computer or upload them directly to blackboard. We will have a quick (it‘€™s very easy) training session at TA orientation each semester.

Copies

The Center‘€™s photocopier machine is available for TAs to use in order to facilitate quality classroom instruction. However, TA usage of the Center’s photocopier must be coordinated with that of the Center’s other administrative and curricular business. To help better coordinate this usage, the following guidelines have been established to make efficient use of the photocopier to support the Center’s teaching and administrative goals.

  • As with the scanner, the Center’s copier is available from 8:30am to 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. For after-hours copying, TAs can request a Copy Card from the Assistant Director of Undergraduate Affairs to be used in the Library or may use the on-campus FEDEX KINKOS located in the University Center with pre-approval from the Assistant Director of Administration on a reimbursement basis.
  • TAs should only copy from loose-leaf originals. Copying materials directly from bound textbooks, monographs, or journals should be undertaken at the library.
  • TAs will have a maximum photocopy limit of 10 pages per enrolled student for each semester. Final enrollments as of the last day to add into the class will be the benchmark for student enrollment numbers.
  • Each TA will be assigned a unique user code.
  • From 12-1pm, TAs will have preferential use of the photocopy machine. However, TAs should recognize that Center staff may also need to use the copier during these hours and thus TAs should be willing to work with Center staff in sharing copier usage during these times. Center staff will show TAs the same courtesy during the other hours of the day.
  • As a common courtesy, TAs should always inquire as to the machine’s availability before using it. Common courtesy also dictates that TAs should not simply expect that the photocopy machine is available upon demand.
  • TAs should attempt to spend no more than 10 minutes occupying the photocopy machine per session.
  • TAs should copy only materials that are relevant to the classes that they are teaching for the Center. Personal use of the Center‘€™s copier is prohibited.
  • TAs are expected to comply with all copyright laws.
  • TAs should respect the fact that Center staff will be working nearby as they are using the machine and should thus work as efficiently and as quietly as possible in making their photocopies.
  • Abuse of photocopying privileges by one TA will affect the privileges for all TAs.

TV/VCR

There is a TV/VCR for TAs use. Please reserve with Administrative Secretary.

Maps, Slide Projectors, Overhead Projectors, Extension Cords

All maps, slide projectors, overhead projectors and extension cords must be reserved and then checked back in to the Administrative Secretary at the front desk. Do not leave slide projectors or overhead projectors in Room 103-D unless it is after 5:00 p.m. If you are using the equipment after hours, call and leave a message at x5164 to let us know that the equipment is in Room 103-D.

Computers

When a computer problem arises, call the Tulane Help Desk at 862-8888 for assistance. The “Help Desk” can assist in solving most software related problems. If the “Help Desk” determines that you need hardware assistance, please notify the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.

Report all other equipment breakdowns to the Center‘€™s Administrative Secretary.

Equipment should be reserved a week in advance. We do not reserve equipment for a whole semester.

Policies and Procedures Specific to Faculty and Staff

The official version of the Staff Handbook is available online.

The official version of the Faculty Handbook is the latest dated version in the University Archives. Each time a change is made, the Office of Academic Affairs will place a new version in the University Archives. The latest dated version in the University Archives controls if there is any difference between it and this web version, or between it and any printed version noted below.

The Faculty Handbook will also be distributed in hard copy to all deans, department chairs, and program chairs each summer. When changes occur, a hard copy of the revised section will also be forwarded, on a timely basis, to these same individuals. A limited number of additional copies will be printed and made available to any faculty member on request, on a first-come, first-serve basis. However, these faculty members will not receive any notices of changes. Of course, one may download the Faculty Handbook from the following website, http://www.tulane.edu/~fachand/.

Financial Support for Affiliated Faculty, Staff, and Students

For all Grant and Funding information (travel, guest lecturer/performer, business meal, special projects etc.), please visit our Grants & Funding page.

Service Learning

Course Development: Integrating Service Learning
There are several ways that faculty incorporate service learning into their courses:

Within a 3 credit course
Students are required to do the service component of the course. All students are required to do at least 20 hours of service in addition to any orientations and rap sessions. Students should have a reflective piece integrated into class lecture, rap sessions and paper requirements (journals or other written assignments).

As an option within a 3 credit course
Students are given an option to do service learning or a research paper. Students electing to do service learning will be required to do at least 20 hours of service in addition to any orientations and rap sessions. Students should have a reflective piece integrated in class discussions, rap sessions and paper assignments (journals or other written assignments).

A fourth credit option
Faculty may use this as a requirement or as an option. The fourth-credit requirements are clearly defined in a document approved by the LAS faculty (December 1997). Students must complete at least 40 hours of service (could be inclusive of rap sessions and orientations), have a reflective piece (rap sessions, journals, class lecture integration, class discussion), and complete a product that can be evaluated at the end of the semester (paper, project completed at the agency). The department must list the 189 or 389 course designation as a one-credit course in which students can enroll.

Requirements for Service Learning in Academic Courses
Service learning may be incorporated into a 3-credit academic course, with the approval of the faculty member‘€™s department and LAS curriculum Committee. If course credit is to be offered specifically for a service learning experience, the following procedure, approved by the LAS faculty on December 3, 1997, should be followed:

In conjunction with the didactic three-credit course (beyond the 100 level), students may be offered the opportunity to sign up for a one-credit course in service learning. The faculty member offering the course will decide whether a service learning experience is available. Similarly, the student should have the option to decline to participate in service learning.

In order to set up a service-learning course, the Department contacts Kim Echols, at the Registrar’s office (x5231), who will list a one-credit course in Service Learning. Each course offered with a service learning add-on must receive a separate listing, using the Department prefix plus the numbers “189 or 389” and a section number. A student taking the additional course credit in service learning will:

Spend at least 40 hours in a community setting during the semester

Complete a “reflection” component, such as a journal or a diary or weekly meetings of a group of peer volunteers that will allow the student to describe and evaluate his/her experiences with the activity.

Complete a product that can be evaluated at the end of the semester – this might involve producing some work that will be of benefit to the community organization (e.g., a brochure, a data management system, a plan for staff organization) or it might be a review paper concerning theories and knowledge in the area of the student’s activity, etc. Meet regularly with his/her instructor to discuss the service learning experience, so that it can be monitored and, if necessary, reoriented, and will be based on demonstrated learning – not merely on hours of service completed.

Students who are placed at an agency as part of Tulane’s work-study cannot carry out service learning hours at the same site. Students will not be remunerated in any monetary form from the enrollment in and completion of a service-learning course.

Research and Project Associate Proposals
For proposal guidelines and materials, please visit our Stone Center Forms resource.

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Upcoming Events

Zale-Kimmerling Writer in Residence Valeria Luiselli

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via Newcomb Institute

Valeria Luiselli was born in Mexico City and grew up in South Korea, South Africa and India. An acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, she is the author of the essay collection Sidewalks; the novels Faces in the Crowd and The Story of My Teeth; Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions and Lost Children Archive. She is the recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship and the winner of two Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, The Carnegie Medal, an American Book Award, and has been nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Kirkus Prize, and the Booker Prize. She has been a National Book Foundation “5 Under 35” honoree and the recipient of a Bearing Witness Fellowship from the Art for Justice Fund. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Granta, and McSweeney’s, among other publications, and has been translated into more than twenty languages. She is a Writer in Residence at Bard College and lives in New York City.

The Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence Program brings renowned woman writers to the Tulane campus. Coordinated through the Newcomb Institute, the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program was established by Dana Zale Gerard, NC ‘€˜85, and made possible by an annual gift from the M.B. and Edna Zale Foundation of Dallas, Texas. Since 2006, the program has been generously supported by Barnes & Noble College Booksellers. In 2010, the program became fully endowed through a gift from Martha McCarty Kimmerling, NC‘€™63, and known as the Zale-Kimmerling Writer-in-Residence program.

Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality Exhibit K-12 Educator Orientation

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Join us for an evening with Tom Friel, Coordinator for Interpretation and Public Engagement as he walks through an innovative tool developed to share the Newcomb Art Museum’s latest exhibit, Laura Anderson Barbata: Transcommunality. The program is designed to introduce K-12 educators to Laura Anderson Barbata’s work and focus on specific elements of the exhibit that connect deeply to the K-12 classroom. While the exhibit is open to limited public access, it plans to open to the public and school visits by Fall 2021. Educators from across the country will find this online introduction to Barbata’s work a valuable resource as the virtual exhibit serves as a unique tool for online learning.

Read more about this exhibit from the Newcomb Gallery of Art About the Exhibit page below:

“The process-driven conceptual practices of artist Laura Anderson Barbata (b. 1958, Mexico City, Mexico) engage a wide variety of platforms and geographies. Centered on issues of cultural diversity, ethnography, and sustainability, her work blends political activism, street theater, traditional techniques, and arts education. Since the early 1990s, she has initiated projects with people living in the Amazon of Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico, Norway, and New York. The results from these collaborations range from public processional performances, artist books and handmade paper, textiles, countless garments, and the repatriation of an exploited 19thcentury Mexican woman ‘€” each designed to bring public attention to issues of civil, indigenous, and environmental rights.

In Transcommunality, work from five of Barbata‘€™s previous collaborations across the Americas are presented together for the first time. Though varying in process, tradition, and message, each of these projects emphasize Barbata‘€™s understanding of art as a system of shared practical actions that has the capacity to increase connection. The majority of the works presented are costumed sculptures typically worn by stilt-dancing communities. Through the design and presentation of these sculptures, Barbata fosters a social exchange that activates stilt-dancing‘€™s improvisational magic and world history. At the core of this creative practice is the concept of reciprocity: the balanced exchange of ideas and knowledge.

The events of this past year ‘€” from the uprisings across the country in response to fatal police shootings to the disproportionate impacts of Covid-19 among Black and brown communities to the bitter divisiveness of the 2020 presidential election ‘€” have renewed the urgency for Barbata‘€™s multifaceted practice. In featured projects such as Intervention: Indigo, participants from various backgrounds reckon with the past to address systemic violence and human rights abuses, calling attention to specific instances of social justice. In The Repatriation of Julia Pastrana, Barbata‘€™s efforts critically shift the narratives of human worth and cultural memory. The paper and mask works presented in the show demonstrate the impact of individual and community reciprocity, both intentional and organic. Through her performance partnerships in Trinidad and Tobago, New York, and Oaxaca, represented throughout the museum, onlookers are invited to connect to the traditions of West Africa, the Amazon, Mexico, and the Caribbean and the narratives these costume sculptures reflect on the environment, indigenous cultures, folklore, and religious cosmologies.

By encouraging diverse collaborators to resist homogenization and deploy the creative skills inherent to authentic local expressions and their survival, Barbata promotes the revival of intangible cultural heritage. Transcommunality horizontally values the systems of oral history and folklore, spirituality, and interdisciplinary academic thought that shape Barbata‘€™s engaging creations, celebrating the dignity, creativity, and vibrancy of the human spirit.”

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An Evening with Multi-Award Winning Author Elizabeth Acevedo

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REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM WEBINAR HERE.

Join us for an evening with Elizabeth Acevedo. Acevedo presents her third book, Clap When You Land, and discusses her writing process and performance background. The discussion will be followed by a reading.

Poet, novelist, and National Poetry Slam Champion, Elizabeth Acevedo was born and raised in New York City, the only daughter of Dominican immigrants. She is the author of Clap When You Land, (Quill Tree Books, 2020); With the Fire On High, (Harper, 2019); the New York Times best-selling and award-winning novel, The Poet X. (HarperCollins, 2018), winner of the 2018 National Book Award for Young Adult Fiction, the 2019 Michael L. Printz Award, and the Carnegie Medal; and the poetry chapbook Beastgirl & Other Origin Myths. (YesYes Books, 2016), a collection of folkloric poems centered on the historical, mythological, gendered and geographic experiences of a first-generation American woman. From the border in the Dominican Republic, to the bustling streets of New York City, Acevedo’s writing celebrates a rich cultural heritage from the island, inherited and adapted by its diaspora, while at the same time rages against its colonial legacies of oppression and exploitation. The beauty and power of much of her work lies at the tensioned crossroads of these competing, yet complementary, desires.

This online program is free and open to the public. It is part of our ongoing series of public engagement programs with Latinx writers that explore Latin America, race, and identity. Read more about Acevedo’s work in this recent article from The Atlantic.

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Newcomb Institute.

REGISTER FOR THE ZOOM WEBINAR HERE.

Other Supported Events

  • March 16, 2021 – An Evening with Dominican Musician and Poet, Fermín Ceballos. Sponsored by the Center for the Gulf South
  • March 25, 2021 – Open Mic Night In Celebration of Elizabeth Acevedo. Sponsored by the Tulane Black Student Union (tBSU) and the Office of Multicultural Affairs

Please help us to support local bookstores by purchasing any copies of Acevedo’s books at Tubby & Coo’s.

For more information, please email crcrts@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: Sociolinguistic Language Variation

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The March 25th session will focus on sociolinguistic variations within the Kaqchikel language. It will be facilitated by Rebecca Moore.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: K'iche' Language Learning

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The April 29th session will focus on K’iche’ language learning with guest speaker Nela Petronila Tahay Tzay. It will be facilitated by Ignacio Carvajal.

Global Read Webinar Series Spring 2021

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies coordinates the annual CLASP Américas Award for Children’s and Young Adult Literature and is excited to collaborate with other world area book awards on this exciting online program. Join us this spring 2021 as we invite award winning authors to join us in an online conversation about social justice, the writing process and an exploration of culture and identity across world regions. This annual Global Read Webinar series invites readers of all ages to join us as we explore books for the K-12 classroom recognized by world area book awards such as the Africana Book Award, the Américas Award, the Freeman Book Award, the Middle East Outreach Council Book Award, and the South Asia Book Award.

Each webinar features a presentation by an award-winning author with discussion on how to incorporate multicultural literature into the classroom. Be sure to join the conversation with our webinar hashtag #2021ReadingAcrossCultures.

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SPRING 2021 SCHEDULE – Read more about the program here.
All webinars are at 7:00 PM EST.

  • January 12 – The Américas Award highlights the 2020 Honor Book, The Moon Within by Aida Salazar
  • February 3 – The Children’s Africana Book Award highlights the 2020 book award winning, Hector by Adrienne Wright
  • March 11 – The Middle East Outreach Award presents 2020 Picture Book award winner, Salma the Syrian Chef by Danny Ramadan, illustrated by Anna Bron
  • April – Freeman Book Award, a project of the National Consortium for Teaching Asia will present a book TBD.
  • May 13 – South Asia Book Award presents The Night Diary by Veera Hiranandani

REGISTER FOR THE SERIES HERE

All sessions are free and open to the public. All times listed refer to Eastern Standard Time (EST). Sponsored by the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, the South Asia National Outreach Consortium, the Middle East Outreach Council, and African Studies Outreach Council, The National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.