Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Nicaragua

The Pacific coast of Nicaragua was settled as a Spanish colony from Panama in the early 16th century. Independence from Spain was declared in 1821 and the country became an independent republic in 1838. Britain occupied the Caribbean Coast in the first half of the 19th century, but gradually ceded control of the region in subsequent decades. Violent opposition to governmental manipulation and corruption spread to all classes by 1978 and resulted in a short-lived civil war that brought the Marxist Sandinista guerrillas to power in 1979. Nicaraguan aid to leftist rebels in El Salvador caused the US to sponsor anti-Sandinista contra guerrillas through much of the 1980s. Free elections in 1990, 1996, and 2001, saw the Sandinistas defeated, but voting in 2006 announced the return of former Sandinista President Daniel Ortega Saavedra. The 2008 municipal elections were characterized by widespread irregularities. Nicaragua’s infrastructure and economy – hard hit by the earlier civil war and by Hurricane Mitch in 1998 – are slowly being rebuilt, but democratic institutions face new challenges under the Ortega administration.

CIA World Factbook: Nicaragua
Photo by M.A. Candidate Keri Libby, Stone Center for Latin American Studies

Nicaragua + People View All
Arachu Castro
Senior Associate Research Fellow - Samuel Z. Stone Chair of Public Health in Latin America
Justin Wolfe
Associate Professor - History, Arceneaux Professorship in Latin American History

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Upcoming Events

The People and Environment of Central America: A Professional Development Institute for K-12 Educators

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Travel Scholarships Due March 1, 2019
Registration Due April 26, 2019

The Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, in collaboration with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute at the University of Georgia and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are proud to announce a professional development opportunity for K-12 educators titled Central America: People and the Environment on June 24 through June 27, 2019.

This summer’s institute is the first in a four-year series that will explore Central America with a focus on people and the environment. The institute will highlight diverse topics of Central America and incorporate hands-on STEM activities. It will focus on indigenous people’s relationship with the environment, as well as broader environmental issues regarding health, infrastructure, and land and water rights. Summer 2019 will focus on climate change and impacts of deforestation, environmental politics and sustainability, and access to water and its relationship to health. The institute is ideal for educators of high school and community college, and pre-service students teaching History, World Geography, Science, and Environmental Science. This four-year series of institutes is sponsored by the Centers for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, Tulane University, and the University of Georgia, and will be hosted at each institute over the course of the four years beginning at Vanderbilt University. Additional support is generously provided by Florida International University.

The registration fee covers breakfast, lunch, and on-campus parking for each day of the institute, as well as materials.The cost per participant is $50 if registration is submitted by April 26, 2019. The cost is $75 if the participant registers after April 26, 2019. There is free registration for pre-service (student) teachers.

Scholarships to cover travel to and from the institute are available through a competitive application. Applications are due March 1, with applicants being notified of their status on/by March 15.

For more information on travel scholarships, schedules, and lodging, visit the official event website.

Read Across the Americas Summer Program at the Children's Resource Center

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Join us every first and third Saturday at 10:30 am for a bilingual storytime for kids ages 2 – 10. The program is part of an initiative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library called the Pebbles Center.

DATES AND TIMES

Saturday, June 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, June 15
10:30 AM

Saturday, July 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, July 20
10:30 AM

Read Across the Americas Summer Program at the Algiers Regional Branch

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Join us every Wednesday at 10:30 am for a bilingual storytime for kids ages 2 – 10. The program is part of an initiative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library called the Pebbles Center. This summer we will explore the environment and diverse geography of Latin America. Bring your favorite jungle animal and be prepared to learn some Spanish as we embark on an adventure through the Americas. This program provides a reading list of recommended titles for all ages to explore Latin America on your own this summer. If you read all books, you will be eligible for a special award offered during Hispanic Heritage month at the annual Celebración Latina held at the Audubon Zoo.

DATES AND TIMES

Wednesday, June 5
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 12
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 19
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 26
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 3
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 10
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 17
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 24
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 31
10:30 AM

K-12 Educator S.T.E.A.M Workshop: Teaching Central America at the Zoo

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Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with the Audubon Nature Institute will be hosting a K-12 educator workshop on Saturday, October 5, 2019. This workshop will focus on conservation efforts and environment of Central American rainforests. This workshop is a great way to learn how to bring real world science into your classroom. Activities will incorporate a variety of sciences and other subjects including: art, environmental science, cultural components, anthropology, computer science and technology. While it is geared for middle and high school teachers, this workshop is open to all educators formal and informal.

Additional details coming soon.