Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Honduras

Once part of Spain’s vast empire in the New World, Honduras became an independent nation in 1821. After two and a half decades of mostly military rule, a freely elected civilian government came to power in 1982. During the 1980s, Honduras proved a haven for anti-Sandinista contras fighting the Marxist Nicaraguan Government and an ally to Salvadoran Government forces fighting leftist guerrillas. The country was devastated by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, which killed about 5,600 people and caused approximately $2 billion in damage.

CIA World Factbook: Honduras
Photo by Tulane undergraduate Jennifer Wickham, School of Architecture

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Suyapa Inglés
SCLAS Assistant Director of Administration
Roxanne Dávila
Professor of Practice - Spanish & Portuguese, Director - Basic Language Program in Spanish
John Edwards
Associate Professor - Economics

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Central America: People and the Environment Asynchronous Institute

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Register now for the ASYNCHRONOUS COURSE which opens up in July
Please note, the synchronous blended institute taking place June 14 – 25 is no longer accepting registrants.

This summer educator institute is the third institute in a series being offered by Tulane University, The University of Georgia and Vanderbilt University. This series of institutes is designed to enhance the presence of Central America in the K-12 classroom. Each year, participants engage with presenters, resources and other K-12 colleagues to explore diverse topics in Central America with a focus on people and the environment. It is not required to have participated in past institutes to join us.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University is excited to host and coordinate this year’s institute. Tulane University and New Orleans are both unique and important places to explore the deep connections to Central America with a focus on people and environment. With presentations by leading historians and sociologists on Central America, environment and race we are excited to share the work and resources from presenters as well as the unique resources at Tulane.

YOU MAY REGISTER FOR THE ASYNCHRONOUS COURSE WHICH OPENS UP IN JULY

NOW REGISTERING FOR THE ASYNCHRONOUS INSTITUTE For more information, please email dwolteri@tulane.edu or call 504.865.5164. Space is limited.