Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

"Living Latina" written by Currin Wallis

By Annie Gibson

I am handing over my blog on the CIAPA Experience to the students participating in the program. This way you all can have a better idea of what life is like for a student at CIAPA. This blog entry is written by Currin Wallis. She is a freshman student who has begun her first semester of Tulane at CIAPA in Costa Rica 2012. Pura Vida, Professor Gibson

Currin’s Blog:

The Latin American bug has bitten me bad. And I think it must be a
carrier of Latin Fever.

I became a victim during family vacations to Puerto Rico with my
grandparents when I was little, followed by trips to the Dominican
Republic and Mexico, living in El Salvador for five months and now I
find myself spending my first college semester abroad in Costa Rica.

I have always had a taste of traveling, something to do with genetics
I guess, and I take any opportunity to explore a new place. Growing up
with two parents well versed in global travels, I was exposed to the
thrill of looking around and not recognizing anything from a very
young age. That love of different cultures and customs has only
strengthened as I have gotten older and searched for independence. I
have always known that I would do a foreign exchange during college,
so why not start right off the bat? The early study abroad experience,
Tulane at CIAPA program was a perfect match- studying topics I am
interested in, within the context of Costa Rica.

My early brushes with Latin American countries influenced my decision
to start learning Spanish in the hopes of becoming fluent. I knew that
language was a unifier, and the ability to communicate with local
people makes the connections to those cultures all the more
meaningful. Now, I am not only practicing and improving my Spanish,
but by consequence of speaking, learning more about Ticos and creating
relationships. One of my favorite parts of the program so far has been
using my Spanish, even just joking around with the cooks, saying hello
to bus drivers or buying fruit at the market. The best way to take on
a language is to truly dive into the community, and force yourself to
talk, write and think in the local tongue. Living in Costa Rica gives
me the opportunity of immersion, into the language and into the
culture. I love walking around San José, listening to Spanish banter
on the streets, watching clown performances, passing through modern
art exhibits, sipping fresh coffee at a café, meandering around used
book shops and obsessing over the walls of graffiti all over the
streets. The city is a bustling hubbub of lots of interesting
characters and great cultural events. Having lived in a suburb for
eighteen years, this new lifestyle of going to the theater, film
festivals and museums is amazing. As an art kid, having all these
options at my fingertips is like putting a fiver-year-old in a candy
store, I just canâ’‘¬’“¢t get enough.

Some other highlights from the trip so far have been our weekend
excursions to other parts of the country. We have seen Volcán Poas,
Monteverde and Rara Avis. The volcano was extraordinary of course,
with the sulfuric blue pool at the top of the smoking mouth. Both
research centers are out in remote areas, Monteverde in the cloud
forests, and Rara Avis in the rain forrest far away from civilization.
We went on walking tours to see some wildlife, checking out the
caterpillars, butterflies, hummingbirds, beetles, birds, beautiful
ferns and palms, and we even ran into a couple monkeys. The natural
habitats were absolutely breath taking; walking through the dense
forests and all the tangling vines, it felt like a movie. Rara Avis
was quite the adventure. A three hour climb on horseback followed by
an hour hiking over slippery rocks and through pits of clay, just
getting to the lodge definitely got us all a bit dirty. They gave us
rubber boots to wear because the trails were so muddy, but the hikes
were great, not to mention led by cute tour guides.

Of course, during the week, our days are packed with studying and
work. The courses are really interesting, and we have the advantage of
taking Latin American classes while living in Latin America. Half of
our professors are from Costa Rica, who are fantastic and eager to
teach. I am taking Spanish classes, a Central American Government and
Politics course, Ecological Biology and Climate Change, an art history
class, Intro to Latin American Studies and TIDES. Spanish is taught at
the local university, UCR, a nice break from being on campus for our
other classes. We joined our politicsâ’‘¬’“¢ professors classes at UCR one
week, which was great to meet some other students and sit through a
full class in Spanish. I am trying to get more involved with the
university community, so I signed up for an oil painting class through
UCR. I miss the art studio I had access to in the States, so I canâ’‘¬’“¢t
wait to get back to the drawing board and mess around with paints,
canvas and brushes. I am usually a ceramics student, this will be my
first ever 2-D art class, but itâ’‘¬’“¢s exciting to branch out and try new
mediums.

In addition to the classroom courses, we are fulfilling our service
learning by working in public schools. Acción Joven is a program that
works with at-risk kids from seventh grade and up to keep students in
school and off the streets. Our group works with two English classes,
and so far itâ’‘¬’“¢s been a blast. We get to help out the teacher with
activities, having conversations, and really just trying to connect to
these kids who are about our age. Each of us CIAPA students have our
own projects in the school. I wanted to get involved with reading
groups or tutoring, and somehow I found myself in a teacher position,
leading a class on Anne Frank and the holocaust, all in Spanish. It
was a bit of a shock that the real professor would hand over her class
to an unqualified, eighteen year old, non-native speaker, in the blink
of an eye. It gave me some insight into the public learning
institutions in this country. They arenâ’‘¬’“¢t very structured, nor very
organized, so flexibility is key. Even though I hadnâ’‘¬’“¢t planned being
the teacher for a day, I took the job and had to make it work. I think
the class went pretty well, and I got at least some information and
major themes into their seventh grade minds. Iâ’‘¬’“¢m hoping to do another
class, but with their system, who knows if that will happen.

My experience here, at CIAPA in Costa Rica has been amazing; I
wouldnâ’‘¬’“¢t trade it for a semester in the U.S for anything. Iâ’‘¬’“¢m excited
to see what the next couple months have in store!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

  • Annie Gibson

    Administrative Assistant Professor - Department of Global Education

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Latin American Library Works-in-Progress Talk with Greenleaf Fellow Sofía Vindas Solano

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Please join the Latin American Library for a work-in progress talk by 2019-2020 Richard E. Greenleaf Fellow Sofía Vindas Solano. Her presentation, entitled “La consolidación de los museos de arte moderno de Guatemala y Costa Rica: nociones visuales de lo local, regional y global en sus colecciones, 1950-1992” will take place on Monday, February 17th, 2020 at 3:30pm at the Latin American Library Seminar Room. The talk will be in English. Refreshments to follow.

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Resumen: Se presenta un avance de la investigación doctoral que examina la consolidación de un espacio artístico-cultural público institucionalizado de arte moderno en Guatemala con el Museo Carlos Mérida y, en Costa Rica, el Museo de Arte Costarricense, para entender cómo este proceso influye en nociones visuales sobre identidades nacionales, regionales y globales presentes en las colecciones de los museos entre 1950-1992. Interesa realizar la comparación de estos espacios y colecciones para evidenciar cómo se transmiten, transforman y digieren las tendencias artísticas entre estos países. Además se pone énfasis en la relación transnacional entre países y artistas, con organismos como la OEA para examinar el impacto de la actividad cultural de José Gómez Sicre en el arte centroamericano.

Abstract: My research at The Latin American Library is part of a doctoral dissertation in progress on the consolidation of an institutionalized, public artistic and cultural space of modern art in Guatemala through the Carlos Mérida Museum and, in Costa Rica, in the Museum of Costa Rican Art, to understand how this process influences visual notions about national, regional and global identities in museum collections between 1950-1992. By comparing these spaces and collections, we are able to trace how artistic trends are transmitted, transformed and digested between these countries. Emphasis is placed on the transnational relationship between these spaces and artists, with organizations such as the OAS, to examine the impact of the work of José Gómez Sicre on Central American art.

Sofía Vindas Solano is an art historian focusing on modern art in Central America. She is currently a doctoral student in the graduate program in History at the University of Costa Rica where she is working on the consolidation of art museums in Guatemala and Costa Rica. Sofía Vindas earned a B.A. in History and Art History as well as an M.A. in Political Science at the University of Costa Rica, where she is also an instructor. She also works as a freelancer on curatorial and research projects. More recently, she has published articles on anti-imperialism in Costa Rican caricature and on the debate surrounding Art Biennale I of 1971 in newspapers of the time.

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About Richard E. Greenleaf (1930-2011)

Until his retirement in 1998, Richard E. Greenleaf served as the France Vinton Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History, and as the Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University. He also served as Chair of the Department of History. Dr. Greenleaf grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and took his Bachelors, Masters and Doctoral degrees at the University of New Mexico, where he studied under the dean of Inquisition scholars, France V. Scholes. Greenleaf’s doctoral dissertation, “Zumárraga and the Mexican Inquisition 1536-1543,” served as the basis for his many excellent publications on the history of the Holy Office of the Inquisition in Latin America. Greenleaf authored eleven major scholarly books, co-authored or contributed to seventeen others, and published almost four dozen articles in the field of Latin American and New Mexico history. He was the recipient of many distinguished awards, among them the Silver Medal, the Sahagún Prize (Mexican National History Award), and the Serra Award of the Academy of American Franciscan History for Distinguished Scholarship in Colonial Latin American History. In his long and distinguished teaching career in New Mexico, Mexico City and New Orleans, Greenleaf served as mentor to 34 doctoral students at Tulane, and countless masters and undergraduate students. Richard E. Greenleaf died on November 8, 2011.

Spring Series: Markets

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In the 2020 spring series, Markets, the State, and Democracy in Latin America, speakers will discuss voter behavior, public opinion and political psychology in Latin America, amidst traditional challenges like clientelism and political polarization and new ones such as the influence of China. These presentations collectively explore how voters in Latin America are torn between multiple competing forces and how difficult the challenge of effective democratic representation remains in the region.

11:45 in the Greenleaf Conference room
Please RSVP to CIPR@tulane.edu

February 17 Prof. Scott Morgenstern (University of Pittsburgh): Battling for Hearts and Minds of Latin America: Covariance of Attitudes towards the United States and China
March 9 Prof. Daniel Hidalgo (MIT)
March 16 Prof. Taylor Boas (BU) A Kingdom of this World: Evangelicals and Electoral Politics in Latin America
April 3 Prof. Abby Cordova (University of Kentucky) Vote Buying and Voter Turnout in Compulsory Voting Systems in Latin America: Implications for the Political Behavior of the Poor

For more information e-mail cipr@tulane.edu or view the poster.

LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship

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The Latin Americanist Graduate Organization (LAGO) is pleased to announce its Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship. This full-day event will include a series of presentations featuring graduate students, faculty, and local leaders working at the intersection of academia and community. All are welcome to attend one or more of three talks. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.


SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE

9 – 9:30 AM | Breakfast

9:30 – 11 AM | “The Role of the Arts in Community Engagement and Activism”
Moderator: Megan Flattley (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Jeffrey U. Darensbourg (Tribal Councilperson and enrolled member of the Atakapa-Ishak Nation of Southwest Louisiana and Southeast Texas), Gabrielle Garcia Steib (Media Artist and Writer), Dr. Edith Wolf (Stone Center Assistant Director for Undergraduate Programs)

11 – 11:30 AM | Break/Networking

11:30 – 1 PM | “Co-Creating Digital Testimonios with Latinx Youth: A Community-Engaged Approach to Scholarship and Action”
Presenters: Jenn Miller Scarnato (City, Culture & Community PhD Candidate) and Rebeca Sauly Santa María Granados (Youth Member of Puentes)
Discussion Moderator: Dr. James D. Huck, Jr. (Stone Center Assistant Director for Graduate Programs and Puentes Board Member)

1 – 2 PM | Lunch

2 – 3:30 PM | “Guiding Principles and Strategies: The Social Sciences and Community Engagement”
Moderator: Carolina Timoteo de Oliveira (Stone Center PhD Candidate)
Panelists: Dr. Claudia Chávez-Arguelles (Tulane Anthropology Faculty), Ruth Idakula (Executive Director at the Center for Ethical Learning and Social Justice Renewal), and Linett Luna Tovar (Stone Center Masters Program Alumna)

3:30 – 4:30 | Networking/Wrap-up

The LAGO Symposium on Community-Engaged Scholarship is co-sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Tulane Mellon Graduate Program in Community-Engaged Scholarship.

Latin American Writers Series: Damián Cabrera

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Join us for an interview with Damián Cabrera about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Damián Cabrera was born in Asunción Paraguay and grew up in Alto Paraná along the Brazilian border. His publications, which explore the realities of the Triple Frontier, include one collection of short stories, sh… horas de contar… (2006) and the novels Xiru (2012)—winner of the Roque Gaona Prize—and Xe (2019). Cabrera has served as editor of the journals El Tereré (2006-2012) and Ku’Ótro (2008) and is an active member of artistic organizations such as Semenario Espacio/Crítico and Ediciones de la Ura. He also teaches film at the Universidad Columbia de Paraguay and art and design at the Universidad Nacional de Paraguay.

Latin American Writers Series: Andrea Palet

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Join us for an interview with Andrea Palet about her life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Andrea Palet is an editor, columnist, and educator from Chile. With almost three decades of experience in the publishing field, she has edited magazines and books in both Europe and South America. In 2014, she became the founding editorial director of Editorial Laurel in Santiago, Chile. Under her leadership, the house has released the works of more than 20 novelists, essayists, and chroniclers. Palet also oversees the Master of Editing program at the Universidad de Diego Portales. A collection of her columns, Leo y olvido, was released in 2018 by Ediciones Bastante.

Latin American Writers Series: Rodrigo Fuentes

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Join us for an interview with Rodrigo Fuentes about his life, interests, and influences. The discussion will be followed by an open Q&A. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Author

Rodrigo Fuentes is a Guatemalan-born writer of short stories. He received the II Premio Centroamericano Carátula in 2014, and his collection Trucha Panza arriba was a finalist for the 2018 Premio Gabriel García Márquez . His works have been published in Guatemala, Bolivia, Colombia, Chile, El Salvador, as well as in translation in France and Scotland. Fuentes is also the co-founder and editor of the magazine Suelta and of the digital publishing house and literary journal Traviesa. He currently teaches in the Department of Spanish at College of the Holy Cross.