Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Social Protection for Food Security report prepared for HLPE

Committee on World Food Security
High Level Panel of Experts (HLPE) on Food Security and Nutrition
Report 4
Rome, 2012

Written by Team Leader Stephen Devereux, Wenche Barth Eide, John Hoddinott, Nora Lustig and Kalanidhi Subbaro.

Summary and Recommendations

Food insecurity refers to both the inability to secure an adequate diet today and the risk of being unable to do so in the future. Social protection is a menu of policy instruments that addresses poverty and vulnerability, through social assistance, social insurance and efforts at social inclusion.

Social protection has risen rapidly up the development policy agenda. This report aims to review evidence and experience, and proposes recommendations for using social protection more effectively to protect and promote food security. The analysis is framed by the recognition that the right to adequate food and the right to social protection are human rights under international law, and that implementing social protection policies and programmes using a rights based approach is not only morally and legally appropriate but is likely to lead to improved food security outcomes.

People who are already poor are vulnerable to hunger because they lack the resources to meet their basic needs on a daily basis. They are also highly vulnerable to even small shocks that will push them closer to destitution, starvation, even premature mortality. The appropriate social protection response to chronic poverty-related food insecurity is social assistance linked to ‘€˜livelihood promotion‘€™ measures that enhance incomes. People who are not poor now but face the risk of future poverty are vulnerable to hunger if these risks materialise and they are inadequately protected against them (they will face transitory food insecurity). These people need effective ‘€˜social safety nets‘€™.

Social protection systems should not be seen as ‘€˜deadweight‘€™ burdens on fiscal systems. Well- designed social protection interventions are good for growth. In particular, by preventing the depletion of assets and reducing the personal risk of investing for the poor, social protection can be a ‘€˜win-win‘€™ strategy: pro-poor and pro-growth.

Find the full text of the report here.

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Upcoming Events

Read Across the Americas Summer Program at the Algiers Regional Branch

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Join us every Wednesday at 10:30 am for a bilingual storytime for kids ages 2 – 10. The program is part of an initiative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library called the Pebbles Center. This summer we will explore the environment and diverse geography of Latin America. Bring your favorite jungle animal and be prepared to learn some Spanish as we embark on an adventure through the Americas. This program provides a reading list of recommended titles for all ages to explore Latin America on your own this summer. If you read all books, you will be eligible for a special award offered during Hispanic Heritage month at the annual Celebración Latina held at the Audubon Zoo.

DATES AND TIMES

Wednesday, June 5
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 12
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 19
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 26
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 3
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 10
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 17
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 24
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 31
10:30 AM

K-12 Educator S.T.E.A.M Workshop: Teaching Central America at the Zoo

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Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with the Audubon Nature Institute will be hosting a K-12 educator workshop on Saturday, October 5, 2019. This workshop will focus on conservation efforts and environment of Central American rainforests. This workshop is a great way to learn how to bring real world science into your classroom. Activities will incorporate a variety of sciences and other subjects including: art, environmental science, cultural components, anthropology, computer science and technology. While it is geared for middle and high school teachers, this workshop is open to all educators formal and informal.

Additional details coming soon.