Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

History

Tulane University is a liberal arts institution founded in 1834. Its academic mission has been identified historically with its region. The latter includes the Mississippi River and Gulf-Caribbean basins as well as the Atlantic and Pacific Worlds linked at the isthmus in Panama. Tulane’s programs have evolved as partnerships with these regional neighbors linked by history and shared inheritances.

Tulane has a long-standing special strength in the study of Central America and Mexico. This concentration originated in a turn-of-the-century gift of a large Mesoamerican library, which became the foundation for the Latin American Library’s holdings of resource materials on Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Mexico, which are internationally distinguished.

In the early part of the century, one of Tulane’s first internationally prestigious program was the Middle American Research Institute, which was founded in 1924 to conduct “advanced research into the archaeology, history, tropical botany, and natural resources and products of countries facing New Orleans across the waters of the south.” Tulane’s identity and destiny were to become one with this early exemplar of its institutional leaders’ commitments to create knowledge and provide service to a region whose boundaries transcended the geopolitical frontiers of the United States. Archaeology, anthropology, history, political science, literature, biology, and earth sciences formed the core disciplines in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, while the Schools of Law, Business, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health developed truly Pan-American programs in the early twentieth century.

Although Tulane expanded its scope to all of Latin America after World War II, the Mesoamerican strength remains and the Stone Center acts as a sort of brokerage for relations between Mesoamerica and the United States. A steady stream of Mexicans and Central Americans come to Tulane for training, as Fulbright Professors and to use our library. Specialists on the region can be found in most departments and the university has produced several hundred dissertations and theses on Mesoamerican subjects. Every summer there are well over 100 Tulane faculty and students at work in the region, whether in archaeological excavations, Maya intensive language program in Guatemala, or dozens of National Resource Center-financed individual research projects.

Our program is today comprehensive with faculty in almost every region and discipline essential to understanding Latin America. The Mississippi-Gulf-Caribbean region is the epicenter of cultural and historical converging and radiating flows of a vast cultural and geographic network embracing Europe, Africa, the Pacific Rim, and North and South America. Today, Tulane University has active programs in African and African Diaspora Studies, the Atlantic World, Comparative Southern Studies, and Cuban, Brazilian, and Francophone Caribbean Studies. The Payson Institute for Applied Development and Technology Transfer offers courses on its New Orleans and Washington D.C. campuses and operates a federally-funded third world disaster center. Our Schools of Law, Business and Public Health and Tropical Medicine operate field programs in every region of Latin America.

Nationally, few institutions of Tulane’s size compare in the number of faculty, graduate students, undergraduate majors, library holdings, and support for research dedicated to the support of Latin American studies across the university. When viewed in relationship to the percentage of the relatively small available pool of institutional resources e.g. faculty, students, library holdings, and budget, Tulane’s commitment to Latin American Studies is comparable or superior to institutions such as Stanford and Duke, among private universities, and to the University of Texas and the University of California at Los Angeles, among large public universities, whose faculties and student bodies are three to five times larger.

Tulane is also a top producer of graduate degrees that focus on Latin America. Since the mid-l960s, over 300 students have graduated with an interdisciplinary M.A. degrees in Latin American Studies and have gone on to positions in the public and private sectors, and for additional training in the disciplines and professions. Almost forty have graduated with the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Latin American Studies since the late l970s. Virtually every one of these graduates is working or has worked in the field. A few placements include University of New Mexico, University of Texas, Smith College, Middlebury College, Banco de Bilbao, Harvard University, U.S. Agency for International Development, and some seven Mexican universities.

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Upcoming Events

The People and Environment of Central America: A Professional Development Institute for K-12 Educators

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Travel Scholarships Due March 1, 2019
Registration Due April 26, 2019

The Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, in collaboration with the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute at the University of Georgia and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are proud to announce a professional development opportunity for K-12 educators titled Central America: People and the Environment on June 24 through June 27, 2019.

This summer’s institute is the first in a four-year series that will explore Central America with a focus on people and the environment. The institute will highlight diverse topics of Central America and incorporate hands-on STEM activities. It will focus on indigenous people’s relationship with the environment, as well as broader environmental issues regarding health, infrastructure, and land and water rights. Summer 2019 will focus on climate change and impacts of deforestation, environmental politics and sustainability, and access to water and its relationship to health. The institute is ideal for educators of high school and community college, and pre-service students teaching History, World Geography, Science, and Environmental Science. This four-year series of institutes is sponsored by the Centers for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, Tulane University, and the University of Georgia, and will be hosted at each institute over the course of the four years beginning at Vanderbilt University. Additional support is generously provided by Florida International University.

The registration fee covers breakfast, lunch, and on-campus parking for each day of the institute, as well as materials.The cost per participant is $50 if registration is submitted by April 26, 2019. The cost is $75 if the participant registers after April 26, 2019. There is free registration for pre-service (student) teachers.

Scholarships to cover travel to and from the institute are available through a competitive application. Applications are due March 1, with applicants being notified of their status on/by March 15.

For more information on travel scholarships, schedules, and lodging, visit the official event website.

Read Across the Americas Summer Program at the Children's Resource Center

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Join us every first and third Saturday at 10:30 am for a bilingual storytime for kids ages 2 – 10. The program is part of an initiative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library called the Pebbles Center.

DATES AND TIMES

Saturday, June 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, June 15
10:30 AM

Saturday, July 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, July 20
10:30 AM

Read Across the Americas Summer Program at the Algiers Regional Branch

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Join us every Wednesday at 10:30 am for a bilingual storytime for kids ages 2 – 10. The program is part of an initiative between Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the New Orleans Public Library called the Pebbles Center. This summer we will explore the environment and diverse geography of Latin America. Bring your favorite jungle animal and be prepared to learn some Spanish as we embark on an adventure through the Americas. This program provides a reading list of recommended titles for all ages to explore Latin America on your own this summer. If you read all books, you will be eligible for a special award offered during Hispanic Heritage month at the annual Celebración Latina held at the Audubon Zoo.

DATES AND TIMES

Wednesday, June 5
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 12
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 19
10:30 AM

Wednesday, June 26
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 3
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 10
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 17
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 24
10:30 AM

Wednesday, July 31
10:30 AM

K-12 Educator S.T.E.A.M Workshop: Teaching Central America at the Zoo

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Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with the Audubon Nature Institute will be hosting a K-12 educator workshop on Saturday, October 5, 2019. This workshop will focus on conservation efforts and environment of Central American rainforests. This workshop is a great way to learn how to bring real world science into your classroom. Activities will incorporate a variety of sciences and other subjects including: art, environmental science, cultural components, anthropology, computer science and technology. While it is geared for middle and high school teachers, this workshop is open to all educators formal and informal.

Additional details coming soon.