Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

History

The principal strengths of the Center include the following:

  • Tulane is one of four continuously funded Latin American National Resource Centers, and has long occupied a critical position as the only Latin American National Resource Center in the Deep South (AL, AR, LA, MS, and TN). Nationally, few institutions of Tulane’s size compare in the number of faculty, students, library resources, and research support for Latin American studies.
  • The Stone Center has an endowment of $15 million, principally from the Zemurray Foundation; it stands today perhaps as the largest of any National Resource Center in the country. In 2004-05 alone it was awarded grants from Louisiana Board of Regents, Rockefeller Foundation, Tinker Foundation, and Zemurray Foundation.
  • The Stone Center’s faculty averages 74 core Latin Americanists, 25 affiliates, 8 visiting professors, and 3 post-doctoral fellows, which represents the largest contingent of faculty associated with any department or program on the Tulane campus. In addition, the Stone Center is administered by 8 professional staff.
  • In the period 2000-2005, Tulane awarded 88 Ph.D.s with Latin American foci in Spanish and Portuguese (25), Anthropology (19), Latin American Studies (15), History (6), Business Administration (5), Political Science (4), Sociology (3), French (2), Economics (1), EEB (1), Geology (1), Parasitology (1), Public Health (1), and Social Work (1).
  • The most recent Gourman Report, Undergraduate Programs (1997) ranked Tulane’s Latin American Studies undergraduate program second in the United States.
  • In 2005 alone, 50 undergraduate students graduated with a Latin American Studies major or minor; 5 majors graduated with honors.
  • As of Fall 2005 there are a total of 36 students enrolled in the graduate program in Latin American Studies, 19 of which are in the Masters program.
  • Tulane is one of three Latin American National Resource Centers that offer an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program; as of Fall 2005 there are 12 students enrolled.
  • The Stone Center’s interdisciplinary graduate program on average admits 12-15 students each year.
  • Latin American Studies GRE scores also continue to rise. According to our internal records, scores averaged 1243 for students admitted in Fall 2001, 1194 in Fall 2002, 1306 for Fall 2003, 1216 in Fall 2004, 1260 in Fall 2005, and 1270 in Fall 2006. Declines often correlate with the number of non-English speaking students admitted in a given year.
  • Ph.D. placements are strong. Of the 20 PhDs awarded since summer 1999, ten are in tenure-track academic jobs, two are in research positions, two are visiting faculty, two are in government, one is a university administrator, one a medical doctor, one a librarian, and one is currently on the academic job market.
  • Tulane’s professional schools provide training options in a wide variety of fields and the Stone Center offers joint degree programs in Business and Law. In 2004-05, the professional schools offered eighty-one courses with more than 25% Latin American content with total enrollments of 2,419 (Architecture 9, Social Work 2, Law 8, Business 13, and Health Sciences 49).
  • Over the last three years, the Stone Center funded 26 summer field research grants for faculty and professional librarians (averaging $1,899 each), provided $22,481 in airfare and per-diem for 64 trips for travel to professional meetings, and awarded over $20,000 for editorial, translation, and publication subsidies and for staff and TAs to attend 15 professional development workshops.
  • In the two-year period 2003-2005, Tulane students participated in twenty-three different study abroad programs in fourteen Latin American and Caribbean countries: Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Peru, and Trinidad & Tobago. In 2003-2005, the average yearly enrollments for summer programs by destination country were: Belize (7), Chile (17), Costa Rica (25), Cuba (62), the Dominican Republic (14), Guatemala (20), Mexico (20), Peru (7), Trinidad and Tobago (10).
  • The Stone Center offers a variety of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs), Portuguese, Kaqchikel Maya, Yucatec Maya, Haitian Creole, and Nahuatl. Tenured or tenure-track faculty teach Portuguese and Kaqchikel. Native language instructors under the supervision of tenured faculty members teach the others. Yucatec and Nahuatl are taught in alternate years on campus with the assistance of native informants who work individually with each student.
  • Tulane’s Latin American Library (LAL) comprises 19% of the Howard-Tilton Memorial Library and occupies one sixth of its floor space. Tulane’s holdings of 420,000 place it among the top four institutions (Texas, Harvard, Yale, and UCSD) who reported to the SALALM survey for 2003-04. In that report, LAL’s number of volumes received annually ranked sixth and its acquisition expenditures seventh. In SALALM’s last report on FTEs in 1999-2000, Tulane’s total FTEs dedicated to Latin American resources ranked third.
  • In the natural sciences, federal funding helped establish a new Ecology and Evolutionary Biology line in tropical biology. Today the department has five tropical biologists working in Latin America.
  • The Stone Center also supports the Latin American Resource Center (LARC), whose mission is to promote the study and understanding of Latin America through a broad range of programs that insure high academic quality and content that is accessible and relevant for our diverse audiences. LARC’s lending library is widely recognized as the largest available collection of audio-visual and curriculum materials on Latin America for educators nationwide. The library includes over 4,000 items.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

PEOPLE

All Events

Upcoming Events

CIPR talk series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance to host political scienctist Victor Menaldo

View Full Event Description

Join the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Victor Menaldo as part of the fall speaker series Critical Issues in Democratic Governance, on Friday, October 26, in 110A Jones Hall. Dr. Victor Menaldo will give a talk titled Authoritarianism and the Elite Origins of Democracy.

Victor Menaldo (Ph.D., Stanford University, 2009) is an associate professor of Political Science at University of Washington and an affiliated faculty of the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences (CSSS), Near and Middle Eastern Studies, and the Center for Environmental Politics. Dr. Menaldo specializes in comparative politics and political economy. Menaldo’s research focuses on the political economy of taxation and redistribution, the political economy of regulation, the political economy of regime change, and the political economy of natural resources.

The event is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to cipr@tulane.edu.

Outgoing authoritarian rulers sometimes design democratic institutions in ways that preserve their political and economic advantages. For example, over two-thirds of countries that have transitioned to democracy since World War II have done so under constitutions written by the outgoing authoritarian regime. This lecture will examine the reasons behind this phenomenon, as well as how different types of political power and economic resources in a society following democratization. Not only do these disparate origins determines polities’ basic architecture, the rights of citizens, and how representative and inclusive the political system becomes, but also has a big impact on the size of future governments and their commitments to social justice and egalitarianism. Statistical analysis and case studies of Chile, Sweden, and several other countries show why some democratic transitions yield unequal political representation and rights for citizens.

Celebrate Caribbean culture and heritage during Caribbean Carnival of New Orleans

View Full Event Description

Bayou Bacchanal, the original Caribbean Carnival of New Orleans, is back for its 16th annual celebration of Caribbean culture and heritage. Presented by Friends of Culture, Bayou Bacchanal will include two days of Caribbean cuisine, dance, music and celebration.

World Wide Dance
Beginning Friday, November 2 stop by the newly-opened, Algiers based, Haitian restaurant Rendezvous, for World Wide Dance. This late-night dance party begins at 10:00 p.m. and doesn’t end until the final dancer clears the floor. Enjoy live sets by locally and regionally based, Trinidadian DJ Phil and DJ Spice. Admission is $10 in advance and $12 at the door and includes access to the World Wide Dance celebration. A cash bar and bites from Rendezvous will be available for purchase.

Bayou Bacchanal Parade and Party
After an evening of dancing and celebrating, rest up for the annual Bayou Bacchanal Parade on Saturday, November 3. Assembly begins at 11:00 a.m. and the parade takes off at noon from Harrah’s. Parade-goers are welcome to come dressed in traditional carnival attire while engaging, marching and dancing to the beats of Soca music along with Casa Samba throughout the French Quarter. The parade’s final destination will be at North Peters & Mandeville Street where the party will then transition to Crescent Park.

From 2:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. several Dancehall, Soca and Reggae performers will grace the Bayou Bacchanal stage for this daylong festival. Guests can expect live performances by local, national and international artists such as: Soca Artist Preacher, Pan Vibrations, Tigress of Trinidad & Tobago, and Mystic of Trinidad & Tobago.

Beats will be provided by DJ Spice and hosted by Lady Pepper. Authentic Caribbean foods, drinks and special merchandise will be available for purchase. Trini Lisa and Boswell’s will be among the official vendors for Bayou Bacchanal 2018. Fest-goers can expect Caribbean staples such as salt fish, curry goat and roti. Tropical drinks including ginger beer, passionfruit juice and Sorrel will also be available. Guests are also encouraged to dress in tradition Carnival attire for a chance to win a grand prize of $2000.

Admission to the Bayou Bacchanal fest is $15 in advance and $20 at the door. For more information on Bayou Bacchanal or Friend of Culture, visit their onsite information booth during the festival or click here.

Bayou Bacchanal Post Party
Closeout Bayou Bacchanal at Island Flavor Bar and Grill and enjoy tasty Caribbean bites, music and dancing. DJ Ray will be spinning beginning at 11:00 p.m. Celebrate the closing of Bayou Bacchanal with a bang!

Forging a New World: Books & Writing in Early Spanish America, 1492-1821

View Full Event Description

On Wednesday, November 14, the Latin American Library at Tulane University will host Dr. Hortensia Calvo, Doris Stone Director of the Latin American Library, for a talk titled, Forging a New World: Books & Writing in Early Spanish America, 1492-1821.

This presentation is part of the Tulane University Women’s Association’s Jane and Herbert Longenecker Lecture Series. The event is dedicated to María García Daly.

La Hora del Cuento: Fall Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

View Full Event Description

This fall, join us for La hora del cuenta bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday, August 25 until Saturday, December 29. Children and parents are welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, September 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 3
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 1
10:30 AM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, August 25
10:30 AM

Saturday, September 22
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 27
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 24
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 29
10:30 AM

2019 Global Read Webinar Series: Diversity in Children's Literature for the classroom

View Full Event Description

This spring, the World Area Book Awards (Américas Award, Africana Book Award, Middle East Book Award, South Asia Book Award, and the Freeman Book Award) will sponsor a free 60 minute webinar on a book recognized by one of the awards and facilitate a discussion with the author on how to incorporate the book into the classroom.

The 2019 Global Read Webinar Series will focus on the theme diversity in children’s literature. The webinar will be recorded and archived online and have accompanying curricula to correspond with the book.

Webinar Schedule

January
Middle East Book Award

February
Africana Book Award

March
Américas Book Award

April
Freeman Book Award

May
South Asia Book Award and picture books from all book awards