Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Student Status

Full-time Residence Status

To hold a fellowship or scholarship or any of the various kinds of assistantships, a student must be registered in full-time residence status. To determine student privileges and assess tuition and fees, a student in full-time residence status must be registered for at least nine hours of graduate credit per semester, or a combination of course work and equivalent academic activities such as teaching or research.

After the student has completed the minimum hours of course work required for the degree and is working on the thesis or dissertation, the student can continue to be classified as a full-time student entitled to full student privileges. The student must register for master’s or dissertation research (LAST 9980 and LAST 9990, respectively) and then the Graduate Advisor at the Stone Center must certify that the student is engaged in academic activities equivalent to full-time residence commitment. Any off-campus employment for remuneration may disqualify a student from receiving Graduate School financial aid

Part-time Residence Status

For the purposes of determination of student privileges and for the assessment of tuition and fees, a student in part-time residence status is any student who is registered for less than nine hours of graduate credit and who is not certified by the department or the program committee as taking a total academic program.

Tenure for Degree Seeking Students

Tenure is the maximum period of time normally permitted for the completion of all requirements for a degree, and it is determined on the basis of consecutive academic years from the date of initial registration for graduate study at Tulane. To be clear, this means that for students who begin as MA students at Tulane, whether in Latin American Studies or in another program, and continue into the Ph.D. program, tenure begins with their enrollment in their Tulane MA program. Tenure is not affected by residence status, nor is it affected by leaves or absence or stipend deferrals. In extreme circumstances, as explained below, tenure may be extended for a short period of time; but a student whose period of graduate study is extended may be required by their committees to retake examinations or to perform additional work.

Master’s Degree

The Stone Center expects that students will complete the MA degree in two years. Occasionally, unforeseen and extraordinary circumstances may prevent a student from completing degree requirements within the two-year time period. In such instances, students may submit a one-time petition for an extension of one or two additional years as the circumstances may warrant. To seek such an extension, students must submit to the Graduate Advisor at the Stone Center before the end of their second year in the MA program the following items: (1) a detailed letter which explains the extraordinary circumstances requiring the need for the extension; (2) a detailed timeline and work schedule for completing the degree requirements during the extension time period; (3) and, if relevant, a letter of support for the extension signed by every member of the thesis committee certifying that they each understand the extraordinary circumstances necessitating the extension and that they agree to the detailed timeline and work schedule for completing the thesis. Within a month of submitting this petition of tenure extension, the Stone Center’s Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Committee will review the petition and will render a decision, which will be communicated to the student. Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to continue in the MA program beyond the maximum allowable 2-year tenure extension period.

Ph.D. Degree

The Stone Center expects that students will complete all requirements for the Ph.D. degree, including the completion of all comprehensive examinations and the submission of a defended dissertation, in seven years. Occasionally, unforeseen and extraordinary circumstances may prevent a student from completing degree requirements within the seven-year time period. In such instances, students may submit a one-time petition for an extension of one, two, or three additional years, as the circumstances may warrant. To seek such an extension, students must submit to the Graduate Advisor at the Stone Center before the end of their seventh year in the Ph.D. program the following items: (1) a detailed letter which explains the extraordinary circumstances requiring the need for the extension; (2) a detailed timeline and work schedule for completing the degree requirements during the extension time period; (3) and, if relevant, a letter of support for the extension signed by every member of the dissertation committee certifying that they each understand the extraordinary circumstances necessitating the extension and that they agree to the detailed timeline and work schedule for completing the dissertation. Within a month of submitting this petition of tenure extension, the Stone Center’s Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Committee will review the petition and will render a decision, which will be communicated to the student. Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to continue in the Ph.D. program beyond the maximum allowable 3-year tenure extension period.

Advising

Role of the School of Liberal Arts

The School of Liberal Arts provides information on university policies, interprets those policies, and makes exceptions to its rules. It is the final arbiter about most questions of admission, financial aid, and university-wide degree requirements.

Role of the Stone Center

Careful advising is vital to the success of all students’ education, professional training, and completion of all degree requirements. Advising carries even greater responsibility in an interdisciplinary program, where courses are selected from a number of departments and where students work with professors throughout the campus. It is the role of the Graduate Advisor to help all students develop a meaningful program from this wide array of resources and to guide you through the many requirements of our different degree programs. Students in both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs have many different advisors and committees throughout the various departments and schools. These advisors and committees also play fundamental roles in the definition of the student’s program and research at distinct phases in the student’s training.

However, the Graduate Advisor is the principle advising resource for Stone Center graduate students. Each student should plan to meet with the Graduate Advisor at least four times during the year for general advising in late-August, late-October, mid-January and mid-March. The goals of these sessions are to plan your degree curriculum and to evaluate your progress. The Graduate Advisor’s office hours are posted at the beginning of each semester. Students are welcome to drop in unannounced during these hours, but scheduling an office visit ahead of time, whenever possible, is always appreciated. Non-office hour appointments may easily be arranged by direct communication with the Graduate Advisor.

Additionally, students should schedule appointments with the Graduate Advisor to discuss mid-semester corrections and changes, career or degree plans, or any difficulties students may be having with their classes. It is preferred that students make an appointment rather than seek counseling over the phone or in the halls.

Role of Departmental Contacts

Disciplinary and department-based expertise is often vital in advising students about the selection of appropriate methodology courses for primary concentrations, about finding faculty members to serve on thesis committees, or about writing scholarly papers in a disciplinary background different from your primary concentration. Consequently, the Stone Center maintains a list of affiliated faculty contact in each department who are familiar with the Latin American Studies Program. These faculty members are the first individuals students should contact when seeking departmental advice. They are not responsible for advising you directly, but rather for directing you to the faculty member within their department who can best answer your question. Although you can visit them directly, it is recommended that you first speak with the Stone Center’s Graduate Advisor so that he can refer you to the correct department and perhaps to a specific faculty member within that department.

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Upcoming Events

Call For Papers- Haiti: Paradoxes, Contraditions, Intersections in the Making of a People

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Haitian Studies Association’s 29th Annual Conference

The Haitian Studies Association will hold its 29th Annual Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, a site that offers scholars a look at how the “making of the people” occurs outside of the geopolitical spaces associated with a nation-state. Indeed, the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 forced not only the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, but also the migration of slaves, slave owners, and free blacks and mulattos between the two former French territories. These movements of people led to the creation of new spaces where migrants linked to an emergent Haiti would become part of a new North American dynamic also characterized by inequalities and exclusion.

The Haitian Studies Association seeks a diverse set of scholarly interrogations of these themes from disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We are especially interested in fully constituted panels, and will prioritize panels that speak directly to our themes and attempt an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Panel and roundtable proposals are to be no longer than 500 words, clearly listing the individual paper titles and authors. Individual paper abstracts should be around 250 words. Presenters are expected to register for the conference in advance to ensure their names are in the program.

Proposals with be accepted until June 1st, 2017. Fore information regarding the conference and guidelines for proposals, click here.

Somos Nós: Brazil on the Move K-12 Educator Workshop

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LARC, along with Vanderbilt and the University of Georgia, is sponsoring a workshop on Brazilian culture and teaching Portuguese. K-16 educators of any discipline and grade-level are welcome to apply to attend this 5 day institute. Throughout the week, educators will work to develop interdisciplinary curricula, which they can bring back to their schools to teach and share with colleagues. The focus of the workshop will be the environment.

Register today!

Check out these photos from the 2015 workshop held in New Orleans.

Check out LARC’s curriculum on Brazil and Portuguese to get ready for the workshop!

Please visit the workshop webpage for more information.

K-14 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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Havana, Cuba | June 17 – July 1, 2017

The Application Deadline has Passed
$3,500.00 for 15 days

This two-week program through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Cuban and Caribbean Studies, and in collaboration with Primary Source provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and country that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don’t miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

Tulane’s summer program is locally sponsored and supported by the National Union of Writers and Artists. Participants will stay within walking distance of the Malecón, the university, and several cultural venues. In addition to field trips in Havana, there will also be group excursions to the historic cities of Trinidad and Cienfuegos, the Che Guevara monument in Santa Clara, Playa Girón, and Viñales.

For more information and for the institute application, please visit the institute webpage.

Summer Reading at the Pebbles Center Algiers

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Celebrate and learn about Latin America with your kids through the Stone Center’s Pebble Center at the Algiers Regional branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

Our summer story hour will take place in June, July, and August on the second Tuesday of every month at 10:30 AM. All books are read in English and Spanish and readings are followed by an activity based on the book. Past books include Counting Ovejas, Drum Dream Girl, and Mango, Abuela, and Me. Readings are free and open to the public. Recommended ages 0 – 5 and parents!

Story Hour Dates/Themes

June 13
TBA

July 11
TBA

August 8
TBA