Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Amazonian Culture and Environment
Andes and Amazon Field School
Napo, Ecuador | June 2 – June 27, 2018

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Andes and Amazon Field School are pleased to offer a brand new program in Napo, Ecuador for summer 2018. This four week program will give students hands-on experience in one of the most biodiverse and endangered forests on earth: the headwaters of the Amazon. Tulane faculty director Dr. William Balée, who has spent a lifetime working with the Ka’apor Indians in Brazil, is a pioneer in understanding the role Amazonian indigenous communities have in the formation and maintenance of the Amazonian forest. Students will enjoy many class sessions in the great outdoors. Housing is in shared double and or triple accommodations in en-suite dorms overlooking the Napo River at the Andes and Amazon Field School (AAFS), and served three meals a day of mixture of Ecuadorian and American dishes with opportunities to savor Andean and Amazonian cuisine. Two courses will be taught for a total of six credits.

Throughout the program, students will learn to see the Amazon from a native perspective. They will spend time in the forest listening to stories told by indigenous elders, making pottery in native style, and learning to prepare native foods and medicines. Students will learn about interactions between local peoples and Amazonian landscapes from prehistory to the present; Amazonian landscapes as an analytic unit from the interdisciplinary perspective of historical ecology; changes and development of forests and savannas since the arrival of human beings; historical, ecological, and cultural forces involved in biological and edaphic diversity in modern forests; long-term effects of prehistoric and historic human occupations and manipulation of landscapes; and implications for conservation and development. In addition to regular activities, the program culminates in a trip to the Yasuni National Park, one of the world’s last unexplored forests.

COURSES OFFERED:
ANTH 3060 (3 credits): South American Indians
ANTH 3710 (3 credits): Historical Ecology of Amazonia

PROGRAM COST:
The cost of the program is $5,000, which includes six Tulane credits (tuition for two courses), plus housing and logistics fees which include lodging at the AAFS, three meals per day, transportation to/from the Quito airport, medical insurance, and specialized group tours and excursions. Airfare to/from Quito (UIO), incidental costs, and extra meals and expenses are not included in the program cost.

APPLICATIONS:
To apply, student applicants must be in good academic standing and have at least a current cumulative grade point average of 2.5. Non-Tulane students are welcome to apply, but should check with their home institution that credits will transfer. There is no pre-requisite or language requirement. No visa is required for this program; however, students must have a valid passport expiring no less than six months after return date.

Complete applications through the online application portal will include:

  • Student’s general and academic information
  • Personal statement of intent
  • Official copy of transcript
  • Copy of front page of VALID passport
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • $300 non-refundable deposit (by credit card online, OR by check made payable to Tulane University; dropped off or mailed to the Stone Center, attn. Laura Wise Person, 100 Jones Hall, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118.)

Click here to visit the online application page via the Tulane Office of Study Abroad. Non-Tulane students will be required to create an account.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: March 23, 2018.

For questions, contact Laura Wise Person by phone at 504-862-8629, by email at sclassum@tulane.edu, or by visiting the Stone Center in 100 Jones Hall.

To view the flyer for this program, click here.

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Congreso de Jornaleros: Experiences and Perspectives from Immigrant Workers in New Orleans

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The Congress of Day Laborers, an organization of immigrant workers and families founded by the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, is a leadership pipeline for hundreds of members into public life and social movement participation. A panel of immigrant leaders from Congreso will share how they have formed alliances across the community and influenced elected officials, as well as how students can help build a more tolerant society.

For more information please email Kate Rose (Vice President, BridgeTulane) at krose4@tulane.edu.

This event is sponsored by BridgeTulane, the Payson Graduate Program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Anthropology and the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice.

Newcomb Art Museum to host Archivist Panel for installation EMPIRE

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On Wednesday, April 25, join the Newcomb Art Museum for an incredible panel, moderated by Rebecca Snedeker, with the archivists of the various collections across Tulane as they discuss their responsibilities as cultural curators and the role od archives on campus.

In celebration of the New Orleans Tri-centennial, Newcomb Art Museum has on display an exhibit entitled EMPIRE, an immersive art installation by Los Angeles-based artists Fallen Fruit, from April 13, 2018 to July 7, 2018 on Tulane University’s uptown campus.

In EMPIRE, Fallen Fruit intentionally includes historical records, ephemeral artifacts, artworks and objects culled from various archives across Tulane’s campus and recontextualizes them in the museum. The archives include those from the Amistad Research Center, Hogan Jazz Archive, the Latin American Library, Louisiana Research Collection, Tulane Law Library, Tulane University Archives, Middle American Research Institute, Newcomb Art Museum, Newcomb College Institute, Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection/Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute and Southeastern Architectural Archive.

This panel is free and open to the public.

Featuring

Kara Olidge, Executive Director
Amistad Research Assistant

Alaina Hébert, Associate Curator of Graphics
Hogan Jazz Archive

Leon Miller, Head of the Louisiana Research Collection

Caroline Parris, Collections Manager
Middle American Research Institute

Sierra Polisar, Art Collections Manager & Registrar
Newcomb Art Museum

Chloe Raud, Head of Newcomb Archives and Vorhoff library Special Collections
Newcomb Art Institute

Justin Mann, Collections Manager
Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection
Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute

Kevin Williams, Archivist
Southeastern Architectural Archive

Ann Case, University Archivist
Howard-Tilton Memorial Library Tulane University Archives

Learn more about the installation by visiting the Newcomb Art Museum’s website. The exhibition has also been featured in the Tulane Hullabaloo and Tulane New Wave.

Chantalle Verna to Present Research on U.S. and Haitian Relationships in Post-Occupation Haiti

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Chantalle Verna for a talk on her book Haiti and the Uses of America: Post- U.S. Occupation Promises on April 26, 2018, at 6:00 PM.

In her book, Dr. Verna makes evident that there have been key moments of cooperation that contributed to nation-building in both countries. Dr. Verna emphasizes the importance of examining the post-occupation period: the decades that followed the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and considering how Haiti’s public officials and privileged citizens rationalized nurturing ties with the United States at the very moment when the two nations began negotiating the reinstatement of Haitian sovereignty in 1930. Their efforts, Dr. Verna shows, helped favorable ideas about the United States, once held by a small segment of Haitian society, circulate more widely. In this way, Haitians contributed to and capitalized upon the spread of internationalism in the Americas and the larger world.

Dr. Verna received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently a professor in the History Department in Florida International University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Verna focuses on the culture of foreign relations, specifically concerning Haiti and the United States during the mid-twentieth century.

Co-sponsored by: Department of History, Graduate Studies Student Association, Newcomb College Institute and XUTULAC (the Xavier and Tulane Latin American & Caribbean Studies Partnership).

Fridays at Newcomb to host Sabia McCoy-Torres for talk on the anthropology of dance

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Join us in welcoming Sabia McCoy-Torres who will present on her research in a talk titled, Shifting the Lens from Harm to Pleasure: What We Learn from Women in Dancehall. Sabia McCoy-Torres is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at Tulane University. She has a Ph.D. in social and cultural anthropology from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the English and Spanish speaking African Diaspora, race, gender, sexuality, transnationalism, and popular music and performance. Geographically, her work is based primarily in the United States and Coast Rica. Dr. McCoy-Torres’s work has been published in Transforming Anthropology and Black Music Research Journal.

The lecture includes a free lunch and is open to the public.

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: caipirão

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Bate Papo! Celebrate the end of the semester with a caipirão happy hour at the local watering hole. We’ll meet outside and quench our thirst while cramming for an exam or two or simply procrastinating. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Decoding the Purity of an Icon

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Join us for paintings and installations by Mexican artist Belinda Flores-Shinshillas in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies this March.

The Webster’s dictionary defines purity as “being free from or unmixed with any other matter.” Decoding the Purity of an Icon is a series of 10 oil female portrait paintings on canvas and 2 installations thought by Flores-Shinshillas to convey the message of recording an individual’s appearance and personality, using the tradition of iconography for veneration of purity and spirituality beyond the representation of the feminine subject. These works of art have been approached in a contemporary manner, making these portraits much more than pure representation.