Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

M.A. In Latin American Studies – Costa Rica: INTRODUCTION

Expand your cultural horizons, immerse yourself in Central American education, and prepare for a wealth of career paths with the Stone Center for Latin American Studies’ new Master of Arts Graduate Program in Costa Rica. This M.A. in Latin American Studies is an immersive 10-month program taught entirely on Tulane’s CIAPA (Centro de Investigación y Adiestramiento Político Administrativo) campus—just a 20-minute drive from San José. Discover the many advantages of this unique program!

  • Investigate key global issues, from immigration and climate justice to violence prevention, from an issue-oriented, Central American perspective.
  • Build on past volunteer projects or undergraduate studies while working toward careers in government, non-profit foundations, journalism, academia, and more.
  • Enjoy Costa Rica’s magnificent biodiversity and rich culture, while examining Central American issues like political fragility, organized crime, and climate change.
  • Study at a top-ranked research university, dedicated to the Central American region for almost 100 years.

The Pura Vida Approach to Policy Initiatives

Tulane’s M.A. in Latin American Studies is a one-of-a kind opportunity to live abroad while critically examining 21st century issues in the Global South. This intensive and immersive 10-month overseas program will provide students with institutional and grassroots perspectives on key global issues such as migration, health, environment, inequality, security, violence prevention, and sustainable human development in democratic societies through a Central American lens.

This program is unique because it allows students to earn a Master of Arts—usually a two-year degree—in just 10 months. It offers a novel approach to learning abroad because rather than enrolling in another nation’s university, students take classes on Tulane University’s own CIAPA campus. It’s the perfect combination of graduate interdisciplinary seminars and practical applications, including in-country field experience. The issue-oriented curriculum is designed to facilitate direct contact with Central American academics, policy makers, and civic actors who are engaged in the formation and critique of policy initiatives.

Immerse Yourself in Invaluable Experience and Education

The M.A. in Latin American Studies in Costa Rica is the perfect stepping stone for careers in journalism, non-profit foundations, NGOs, multilateral organizations, academia, and government, corporate, or humanitarian service. Ideal candidates include students who have worked or volunteered either in Latin America, or in policy organizations in the United States—or anyone with a bright mind and a serious interest in deepening their regional knowledge and developing expertise in policy studies. The program is also ideal for recent college graduates who are anxious for new knowledge and experience, but are still determining their professional or advanced academic plans.

Globalize Your Policy Studies with 10 Months in Costa Rica

Costa Rica has almost six percent of the world’s biodiversity, gets roughly 98% of its energy from renewable sources, and is the most politically stable country in Central America. It’s the perfect home base for students developing expertise in a region distinguished by the complexity of its challenges and the resiliency of its civil society and grassroots responses. Among the most pressing policy issues covered by the program are low economic growth, deep inequalities, social exclusion, political and social fragility, prevalence of organized crime, and vulnerability to climate change.

Students will study at CIAPA’s beautiful two-and-a-half-acre campus in the suburb of Curridabat, about 20 minutes by car from the eastern edge of San José. Program activities will be facilitated through Tulane’s exchange agreements with the University of Costa Rica and other regional institutions, and the program also includes intensive workshops in Guatemala and El Salvador. With regard to housing, students will be able to participate in a homestay program or will secure their own independent housing.

Tulane Prestige and Pura Vida Are Yours in Costa Rica

Tulane University is a top-ranked school with a commitment to the study of Central America dating back to the founding of the Middle American Research Institute in 1924. In 1975, Tulane co-founded CIAPA, a research institute in San José, Costa Rica, dedicated to analyzing Central American politics and economics. Over the last decade, Tulane’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and its Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR) have sponsored vigorous new research initiatives, public forums, and student programs at Tulane-at-CIAPA.

For more information about Tulane’s M.A. in Latin American Studies, check out the following links.

Graduate M.A. Program in Costa Rica Main Page
Application, Language Requirement, Costs of Attending, Financial Aid
Program Oversight, MA in Costa Rica
2018 Program Schedule, MA in Costa Rica

To apply visit Tulane’s Applying to a School of Liberal Arts Graduate Program. Once on this site, scroll down to the APPLY HERE: School of Liberal Arts MFA, MA, 4+1 MA or PhD Application Form section and click on the “Application Form” link. This will lead you through the process of setting up an application account. You must apply to the Costa Rica M.A. Program through the regular Latin American Studies graduate program. When you are asked to indicate the Term in which you wish to enroll, please select “Fall 2018.” (Please note that selecting “Fall 2018” is just an application system formality. The M.A. Program in Costa Rica does not actually start in Fall 2018, but in May 2018.) For the Degree selection, choose “MA-Masters of Art.” For the Program selection, choose “Latin American Studies.” And under the MA program selection field, select “Costa Rica.” From there, proceed to completion of all other parts of the online application. If you have any additional questions or would like more information, please call 504-865-5164 or email the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at rtsclas@tulane.edu.

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Upcoming Events

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Latin America at a Crossroads Series to host Dr. Wendy Hunter for a seminar on Brazil

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Please join us in welcoming Dr. Wendy Hunter for a seminar on Brazil as part of the Latin America at the Crossroads spring seminar series. Democracy is under threat in Brazil. The economy has stagnated, crime is rife, standards of living are deteriorating, and a massive corruption scandal, “Operation Car Wash,” is sweeping up a large swath of the country’s political and economic elite, exposing the dark underbelly of past administrations. Ex-President Luiz Inacio ‘Lula’ da Silva, who is seeking a third term, has been convicted of corruption and sentenced to a long prision term – potentially leaving the Workers’ Party bereft of leadership and fragmented the popular vote. With multiple presidential contenders, including a fiery right-wing authoritarian Pentecostal, who is likely to emerge as the front runner? And how might Lula influence the election, whether or not he is ultimately allowed to run?

Dr. Wendy Hunter, professor in the Department of Government at the University of Texas – Austin, studies Comparative Politics, with an emphasis on Latin American affairs. She has done in-depth work on the military in Brazil and the Southern Cone, as well as research on social policy issues in Latin America, with special attention to the politics of education and health reform. She has also published a book on the Workers’ Party of Brazil and numerous articles in leading political science journals. Professor Hunter currently works on issues concerning identity documentation in the developing world.

Throughout the Americas, countries are facing questions about the future direction of their domestic and international politics. In Latin America at the Crossroad, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Inter-American Policy and Research will host speakers to discuss the critical junctures currently facing Honduras, Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil.

Join us as speakers address the big picture of domestic politics, including the current political environment and recent political developments, as well as the state of each country’s bilateral relationship with the United States.

Events are free and open to the public, but RSVP is required.

For more information and to reserve your seat, please contact Sefira Fialkoff at cipr@tulane.edu or (504) 862-3141.

Congreso de Jornaleros: Experiences and Perspectives from Immigrant Workers in New Orleans

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The Congress of Day Laborers, an organization of immigrant workers and families founded by the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, is a leadership pipeline for hundreds of members into public life and social movement participation. A panel of immigrant leaders from Congreso will share how they have formed alliances across the community and influenced elected officials, as well as how students can help build a more tolerant society.

For more information please email Kate Rose (Vice President, BridgeTulane) at krose4@tulane.edu.

This event is sponsored by BridgeTulane, the Payson Graduate Program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Anthropology and the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice.

Chantalle Verna to Present Research on U.S. and Haitian Relationships in Post-Occupation Haiti

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Chantalle Verna for a talk on her book Haiti and the Uses of America: Post- U.S. Occupation Promises on April 26, 2018, at 6:00 PM.

In her book, Dr. Verna makes evident that there have been key moments of cooperation that contributed to nation-building in both countries. Dr. Verna emphasizes the importance of examining the post-occupation period: the decades that followed the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and considering how Haiti’s public officials and privileged citizens rationalized nurturing ties with the United States at the very moment when the two nations began negotiating the reinstatement of Haitian sovereignty in 1930. Their efforts, Dr. Verna shows, helped favorable ideas about the United States, once held by a small segment of Haitian society, circulate more widely. In this way, Haitians contributed to and capitalized upon the spread of internationalism in the Americas and the larger world.

Dr. Verna received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently a professor in the History Department in Florida International University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Verna focuses on the culture of foreign relations, specifically concerning Haiti and the United States during the mid-twentieth century.

Co-sponsored by: Department of History, Graduate Studies Student Association, Newcomb College Institute and XUTULAC (the Xavier and Tulane Latin American & Caribbean Studies Partnership).

Fridays at Newcomb to host Sabia McCoy-Torres for talk on the anthropology of dance

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Join us in welcoming Sabia McCoy-Torres who will present on her research in a talk titled, Shifting the Lens from Harm to Pleasure: What We Learn from Women in Dancehall. Sabia McCoy-Torres is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at Tulane University. She has a Ph.D. in social and cultural anthropology from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the English and Spanish speaking African Diaspora, race, gender, sexuality, transnationalism, and popular music and performance. Geographically, her work is based primarily in the United States and Coast Rica. Dr. McCoy-Torres’s work has been published in Transforming Anthropology and Black Music Research Journal.

The lecture includes a free lunch and is open to the public.

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: caipirão

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Bate Papo! Celebrate the end of the semester with a caipirão happy hour at the local watering hole. We’ll meet outside and quench our thirst while cramming for an exam or two or simply procrastinating. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.