Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Podcasts

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies provides excellent opportunities for engaging with Latin America. These podcasts were created to fulfill academic service learning as well as independently. Through reflection, assessment and “learning by doing”, students gain deeper understanding of course content and the importance of civic engagement. The Latin American Resource Center (LARC) presents these podcasts as part of our students’ research on the current issues affecting the New Orleans Latino community. To see our podcast collection on SoundCloud, please visit Enlaces Américas. These podcasts can be used in the K-12 classroom as primary sources. Support for the production of these podcasts is sponsored in part by Tulane’s Center for Public Service.

Summer 2016 – Podcasts produced as part of the Summer 2016 Educator Institute in Cuba

  • Brigadistas: Stories from Cuba’s Literacy Campaign
    A group of teachers from Tulane’s Summer Teacher Institute in Cuba interview Diana Balboa Hernández who was a brigadista during Cuba’s literacy campaign. The podcast introduces the Cuban literacy campaign, examines the role of young people as teachers, and contains interviews with people who taught as part of the campaign. The podcast was hosted by Professor Carolina Caballero and produced by Denise Woltering Vargas and Valerie McGinley. Technical direction provided by Thomas Walsh. 21:00.

Fall 2015 – Podcasts produced in Latin American International Relations, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service

  • The Effects of the Cuba Normalization on New Orleans – Produced by Meghan McAllister, James Lambert, and Rebecca Singer, this podcast reflects on the developing nature of business ties between Cuba and New Orleans. What advantages will the opening of trade with Cuba bring to economic development for New Orleans? Produced in conjunction with Latin American International Relations, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 7:53.
  • Cuban Culture in New Orleans – Local scholars and Cuban migrants note similarities in the cultures and lifestyles that characterize Cuba and New Orleans. Yet, the search for Cuban influence is more difficult than expected. Madeleine O’Neil, Ellen Gosnell, and Rachel Cohen report on the cultural ties beneath the surface. Produced in conjunction with Latin American International Relations, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 6:28.
  • Challenges Before and After the Border – Alexis Zickafoose and Lucy Lloyd speak with several Central American immigrants, who either came to New Orleans as children, or whose children migrated here alone. Through research and conversations with these immigrants, we seek to reveal the reasons for leaving their home countries, living in New Orleans, and all of the challenges along the way. Produced in conjunction with Latin American International Relations, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 7:49.
  • The Banana Republic of New Orleans – Sam Zemurray is a controversial figure. Known as the Banana King, he established a banana trade empire founded in New Orleans. To save his empire, he started a coup in Honduras that overthrew their government in 1911. On the other hand, he also gave a large part of his fortune to philanthropic causes, particularly Tulane University. But why is it that Tulane students do not know who Zemurray was? Produced by Breanna White, Shelby Pinkerton, and Olivia Colbert in conjunction with Latin American International Relations, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 5:35.

Summer 2015 – The summer podcasting projects were produced in Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love as part of the Altman Program.

  • Costa Rican Culture in the Face of Globalization – William Copeland and John McGuire report from San Jose, Costa Rica on the promotion of Costa Rican culture in the face of globalization, particularly the role of the ministry of culture. They emphasize the cultural diversity of Costa Rica and the role of the ministry in promoting a variety of different cultural traditions. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 7:24.
  • Costa Rica’s Migration Problem – Franny Hocking and Gabby Lysko report from San Jose, Costa Rica on the Costa Rican migration process. Costa Rica sees high numbers of migrants from Nicaragua. Most of these migrants work in low wage agricultural jobs. Costa Ricans have varying views on the undocumented migration of individuals from Nicaragua. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 5:06.
  • The Effects of CAFTA on Costa Rica – The Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) has had lasting effects on both large international corporations and small business in Central America. Bobby Mannis and Daniel Finley discuss the influence of CAFTA on Costa Rica, through interviews with San Jose residents, whose views on the effects of the agreement, and its implications for Costa Rica, vary greatly. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 7:47.
  • From Amazon to Bayer Pharmaceuticals: A New Perspective on Costa Rica’s Foreign Direct Investment – Produced by Andrew Landseidel and Katherine Fisher in San Jose, Costa Rica, this broadcast explore how Costa Rica encourages foreign direct investment (fdi) particularly from pharmaceutical companies. The Costa Rican Investment Promotion Agency (CINDE) promotes foreign investment, particularly for companies which require skilled labor. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 9:20.
  • The Inter-American Court of Human Rights – The Inter-American Court of Human Rights is based in San Jose, Costa Rica. Molly Noonan and Sara Scott explore the history of this court, its role in dealing with human rights violations in the Americas, and how it came to be based in Costa Rica. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 5:05.
  • Looking at Sustainable Development in Costa Rica’s Fishing Cooperative in Tarcoles – Anna Strnisha, Rachel Lewis, and Robert Bond report from San Jose, Costa Rica on sustainable fishing practices on the Costa Rican coast. They report on a fishing cooperative which helped small farmers maintain their fishing practices in the face of large scale fishing corporations and changing environmental conditions. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 7:04
  • Measuring the Impact of Microfinance in Costa Rica – Amanda Verdi, Caroline Blatt, and Adrian Arnold report from San Jose, Costa Rica on a microfinance campaign in Costa Rica. Acorde, a NGO, provides low-interest loans, courses, and workshops to help people understand how to run a business. Microfinance loans help low-income residents build their own businesses to increase economic independence. Produced in conjunction with Introduction to Globalization, taught by Prof. Casey Love, as part of the Altman Program, and the Center for Public Service. 5:54.

Fall 2014 – This semester’s podcast projects were produced in Mexican Politics, taught by Prof. Casey Love.

  • Historical Perspectives on the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans and Cultural Promotion – Learn about the oldest Mexican Consulate in the United States, based here in New Orleans. Justin Taffet and Zach Lipschutz explore the cultural and historical connections between New Orleans and Mexico and the role of the Consulate in these connections. Produced in conjunction with Mexican Politics, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 5:17.
  • Mexico’s Oil Market and US Relations – With the recent economic liberalization of the energy sector in Mexico Noah Israel and Shyam Deolalikar explore the potential for increased US-Mexico economic relations in the energy sector. The recent reforms, combined with NAFTA, will create stronger ties between the two countries. Produced in conjunction with Mexican Politics, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 9:26.
  • Mexican Nationals Caught in the Louisiana Justice System – Ella Bartlett and Cecilia Santini examine the role of the Consulate of Mexico when Mexican Nationals become involved in the Louisiana justice system. They examine the rights of the consulate, foreign nationals, and the help the consulate can provide. Produced in conjunction with Mexican Politics, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 5:45.

Spring 2014 – This semester’s podcast projects were produced in Politics of Immigration, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and Advanced Portuguese through Film, taught by Prof. Annie Gibson.

  • Brazilian Food in New Orleans – Think there should be connections between food in Brazil and food in New Orleans? Think again! Mariana Wilson and Sierra Orlowski interview local Brazilians about the food they eat in New Orleans. They visit several Brazilian restaurants and learn about how these restaurants are a fundamental part of the Brazilian community in New Orleans. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese through Film, taught by Prof. Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 5:40.
  • Brazilian Family in New Orleans – Family is important to Brazilian society. One of the hardships of emigrating to the United States is that Brazilians do not get to see their family very often. The cost and difficulty in travelling to Brazil means visits between families do not happen very often. Max Pattsner and Katie Field talk with Brazilian immigrants in New Orleans about the importance of family. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese through Film, taught by Prof. Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 8:05.
  • Malandragem in Brazil – Malandragem is a Brazilian word which refers to someone who knows how to navigate all the ins and outs of bureaucracy and culture. Malandragem has its roots in Samba music, a traditional Brazilian music and dance style. Edward Sapp, Kalia Lopez, and Carlos Abarca explore the term and how Brazilians view these individuals. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese through Film, taught by Prof. Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 5:22.
  • Samba and Second Lines – Samba, a Brazilian traditional music and dance style, has many similarities with the New Orleans Second Line. Julie Gamze, Simon Edber, and Justin McGlashan explore the changes which tourism has brought to both Samba and Second Line music and performance. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese through Film, taught by Prof. Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 8:30.
  • Asian Immigrants in Academia in New Orleans – Much of the news about immigration concerns those from Latin America. In academia, however, many researchers come from Asia. Linda Long and Nathan Gu talk with Tulane professors about their experiences emigrating to the United States and how their immigrant status affects their work and research. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 6:35.
  • Chinese Students in U.S. Universities – The number of foreign students at U.S. Universities, particularly from China, has increased drastically in the last 10 years. Daphne Zhang and Henry Green explore the lives of Chinese students at Tulane. They examine how these students interact with the Tulane and New Orleans Communities. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 6:33.
  • Health Care for Immigrants in New Orleans – Many immigrants from Latin America have come to New Orleans and have been a vital part of the rebuilding efforts since Katrina. A common problem for undocumented immigrants is access to health care. Jesse Bird, Sam Sgroi, and Nate Treacy explore the access to health care of undocumented immigrants from Latin America and how workers deal with the complications of access to this vital resource. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 7:36.
  • Mexican Restaurants in New Orleans – Katherine Honeywell and Katie Keefer explore authentic Mexican food in New Orleans. Mexican food is a way of the Mexican community expressing their identity to the New Orleans community and creating a sense of understanding of the Mexican community. Produced in Conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Prof. Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 5:46.

Spring 2013 – This semester’s Enlaces Américas podcast project focused on Immigration with Professor Casey Love’s Politics of Immigration course and on Brazil with Professor Annie Gibson’s Advanced Portuguese course.

  • Exploring Tropicalia – Fuzzed out, distorted guitar. The Beatles. Social unrest. Samba drums? During the late 1960s, a Brazilian rock movement emerged and asked: ‘just what is the Brazilian identity?’ A close-knit group of musicians combined traditional Afro-Brazilian sounds with the new rock-and-roll influence and created the Tropicália movement. Facing opposition from the military regime and ardent Brazilian nationalists, they ventured to expand what it means to be Brazilian. Sophie Joseph, Evan Williams, and Zach Hoyt investigate. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Professor Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 7:40.
  • Futebol: Brazil’s National Sport – Brazil recently scored the opportunity to host the 2014 World Cup! The country has been hard at work building stadiums and beautifying its host cities to put its best face forward. Having recently hosted the 47th National Super Bowl, New Orleans is very familiar with the pressure Brazil feels to get ready for droves of soccer fans. Sports fans in Brazil and New Orleans talk about their memories, concerns and pride in being a host city, thrust into the international spotlight. Emily Carlson, Emily Cuevas, and Elizabeth Edel investigate. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Professor Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 5:47.
  • Immigration and Education- Undocumented immigrants want the same advantages for their kid as any parent but they face unique challenges in the US school system. Approximately 5.5. million children have a parent who is living here illegally. Jama lee and Mark Firmin investigate the challenges of one immigrant family in educating undocumented daughters in the US and the resources available to them in their adopted home of New Orleans. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration taught by Professor Casey Love and the Center for Public Service. 6:55.
  • Managing Cultural Identities- Navigating multiple cultural identities in America is a challenge for second generation immigrants. Within the last ten years the Hispanic population in the greater New Orleans area has grown by 57%. For some, one difficulty is finding a balance between their heritage and their Americanism. For the Gutierrez family participation on the Jefferson Parish Seahorses Swim Team helps. Reporters Jessie Freedman and Jasmin West dive into the family’s attempt to maintain their heritage while working on an American identity. Produced in conjunction with Professor Casey Love’s Politics of Immigration course and the Center for Public Service. 8:57.
  • NOLA Food Trucks – Green and red sauces drizzle over spicy pork gorditas and beef tacos. A crowd of young college students clusters around Rubens Taco Truck to satisfy their cravings. Rubens is a Brazilian street food vendor, a businessman creating economic opportunity through inexpensive eats. But Rubens, like most street vendors in New Orleans, faces legislative obstacles hindering opportunity. What are these obstacles to the street vending community? What is the position of both sides of this fight? Axel Lloyd, Daniel Thunell, and Gabriella Cerqueira dig into spicy the issue. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Professor Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 9:08.
  • Policing and Immigration: El Protector Program- Many people think that the New Orleans police department has not responded well to the local Latino community. Perhaps surprisingly in areas where Latinos are heavily concentrated, such as New Orleans East, NOPD is working with Catholic Charities to respond to communication complaints and crime. Aaron Weitzner and Leah Jaques investigate how NOPD program El Protector has expanded safety in one Latino community but not been expanded to others. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Professor Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 7:05.
  • Radio in Brazil – With 49.5 million listeners in Brazil today, radio is an institution as Brazilian as samba itself. Brazil was the birthing ground of the short wave transmitter and has the oldest history of radio in Latin America. But it hasn’t remained static radio has been growing and changing with the years, from its birth early in the 20th Century through repeated dictatorships and into the modern era. Archibald Rowan, Daniela Garcia-Schulz, and Emily Floyd investigate. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Professor Annie Gibson, and the Center for Public Service. 4:56.
  • Perspectives on the H1B Visa- A controversial government program allows high skilled foreign workers to temporarily work in the United States, frequently in the fields of engineering and IT. This program is the H1B program; it allows American companies the opportunity to hire the best and brightest workers and foreigners the opportunity to experience life in the United States. These workers frequently face challenges including mistreatment by employers, poor wages, and limitations in visiting their homelands. Jodan Baudsen and Greg Gaumondd report. Produced in conjunction with Professor Casey Love’s Politics of Immigration course and the Center for Public Service. 7:51.
  • Regionalism in Brazil – When you hear the word “Brazil,” what comes to mind? Tropical beaches? Carnaval? Probably sexy sun-tanned women and chiseled soccer stars – and maybe the Amazon rainforest. Truth is, though, that there’s more to Brazil than a tropical paradise -really, geographically more. Have you ever heard “Brazil” and thought “cowboys” or “farmers?” In the country’s Interior region and in the state of Minas Gerais, there thrives a radically different culture from those in Rio’s beaches and São Paolo’s sprawling cityscape-and these different cultures are the economic drive for this rapidly-developing country. Lulu Kiffer, Simone Akgulian and Pat Duffy investigate. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Annie Gibson and the Center for Public Service. 8:55.
  • Roots of Racism in Brazilian Education – For many young adults, the long process of applying to universities is all too familiar. While students in the US stress about SAT scores and writing stellar essays, college hopefuls in Brazil focus on just one exam, the vestibular. Though upper-class private schools provide tutoring and special classes early on, low-income students lack resources to properly prepare for this exam. And, complicating the matter further, there is a strong link between darker skin and lower class. While public universities have implemented quotas in an attempt to overcome these disadvantages, roots of racism in Brazilian education run deep. Sutton Bailey and Riley Russell tell the stories of two very different college experiences. Produced in conjunction with Advanced Portuguese, taught by Annie Gibson and the Center for Public Service. 7:46.
  • Should we Stay or Should we Go: Latinos during Hurricane Evacuations- Deciding whether to stay or pack up for a hurricane isn’t easy. For undocumented immigrants it can be incredibly risky. Shelters such as the Red Cross can’t promise them amnesty from immigration and customs enforcement and ICE won’t hesitate to deport them at checkpoints. Maureen O’Neill and Gabrielle Stewart met with both documented and undocumented workers about whether to stay or go when a hurricane hits New Orleans. Produced in conjunction with Politics of Immigration, taught by Professor Casey Love, and the Center for Public Service. 4:47.

Fall 2012 – Produced as part of the Latin American Resource Center’s Enlaces Américas podcast project.

  • Irse Hacia el Norte/Going North – Stone Center for Latin American Studies’ graduate student Ryan Riedel created this piece on the issues of migration through performance art. 7:02.

Spring 2012 – Produced in collaboration with Eve Abrams and the Center for Public Service, in coordination with Professor Love’s Politics of Immigration course.

  • From Latin America to New Orleans: Stories of Crossing Borders – With the current debate surrounding immigration reform, and the sad reality many face trying to migrate north, many ask why. Why do many men, women, and children continue to face dangerous situations in order to migrate north only to live a life without papers and often hidden in the shadows? Stacey Neve, Isabelle Miller, and Katie Glenn engage with the New Orleans immigrant community in order to learn more. Produced in connection with the Politics of Immigration course taught by Professor Casey Love and in collaboration with the Center for Public Service. April 2012 9:00 mins.
  • Post-Katrina Law Enforcement and the Latino Community – When the waters receded after the federal flood of 2005, two main groups occupied the city of New Orleans. The first, law enforcement officials charged with keeping order in a chaotic wasteland. The second, an unprecedented wave of undocumented latino immigrants who sought to capitalize on the opportunity to clean up and rebuild. Now, nearly seven years later, Patrick Harvey and Justin Klein set out to gain some perspective on how these events have forever changed both the city and the dynamic between these two important groups of residents. The first stop is Jackson Square in the French Quarter. Produced by Justin Klein and Patrick Harvey April 2012. Patrick Harvey and Justin Klein produced this piece. Produced in connection with the Politics of Immigration course taught by Professor Casey Love and in collaboration with the Center for Public Service. 13:57.

Fall 2011 – Produced in collaboration with Eve Abrams and the Center for Public Service, in coordination with Professor Casey Love’s Mexican Politics course.

  • New Immigrants and Esperanza Charter School – Tulane students visited Esperanza Charter School and Tulane University to learn more about the new programs offered to immigrants. The responses have been overwhelmingly positive. Produced by Saisha Chandrasekaran and Beth Klosner. 4:18.
  • New Orleans and Latin America: Feeling Right at Home – Long-standing cultural parallels between New Orleans and Latin America have new residents feeling right at home, and many are deciding to alter their plans and stay in the Big Easy. Produced by Tanner Harper and John Woods. 7:51.
  • Institutions and Community-Building in New Orleans – The local Latino community, although substantial in size, is not nearly as well-organized as other communities. Tulane students discovered what exactly is standing in the way of a more cohesive Latino community. Produced by D.J. Piazza and Charlotte Goudeau. 5:26.
  • Immigrants, English and Enforcement in New Orleans – Mid-City’s First Grace Methodist Church proposes a solution to the challenges that Spanish-speaking immigrants face in New Orleans: teaching English. But language acquisition is just a first step toward creating lasting changes among Latino communities. Produced by Ryan Riedel. 10:09.

Spring 2011

  • Discovering Brazil in your Local Community – This podcast explores the work of local community group, Casa Samba to educate the community about the cultural diversity of Brazil. Produced by Brian Grober, a Social Media Vista at Tulane’s Center for Public Service.
  • Roots of Capoeira – This podcast explores the roots of capoeira as well as looks at how local Capoeira schools incorporate it into the community to help people. Five minutes. Produced by Andrew Bankston, Bryn Mariani, and Eric Rawls.
  • Stories of Migration – Hear three different migration stories and learn more about the complexity behind the many different reasons Latinos leave their home to migrate to the United States. Produced by three Latin American Studies majors.

Fall 2010 – Produced in collaboration with Eve Abrams and the Center for Public Service, in coordination with Professor Casey Love’s Latin American International Relations course.

Spring 2010 – Produced in collaboration with the Center for Public Service, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies’ Latin American Resource Center, and professors Annabella España-Nájera and Casey Love.

  • Immigration and the Family – This podcast explores important issues facing many families across the U.S. and Latin America today. Produced by James Gilbert, Elyse Toplin and Nain Martinez.
  • In Their Own Words – The podcast uncovers common reasons many living in Latin America choose to migrate to the United States and New Orleans in particular. Produced by Dan Demeules, Kerry Spence, and Veronica Cordova.

Fall 2009

  • Latino Healthcare in New Orleans This podcast explores the state of Latino healthcare in New Orleans. Twelve minutes. Produced by Michael Schmitt and Lukas Lasyone.
  • New Orleans Taco Trucks – This podcast discusses the political and cultural environment surrounding the presence of Taco Trucks in Orleans Parish. Produced by Laura Pyles, Lizz McNamara, and Chris Burchett.

Spring 2009 – Produced in coordination with Professor Casey Love’s Latin American International Relations course.

Fall 2008

  • Día de los Muertos 2008 – This podcast explores a Day of the Dead altar built in the New Orleans Cabildo, once the local seat of government during Spanish colonial rule. Produced by Rachel Wenzel and made possible with support from the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Center for Public Service at Tulane, and with cooperation from the Cabildo & Louisiana State Museum.
  • Latin American Relations and Barack Obama – This podcast explores perceptions in Latin America toward Barack Obama. Produced by Rachel Wenzel, with support from the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Upcoming Events

Film Screening: El Súper with filmmaker Iván Acosta

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The 1979 film version of Cuban filmmaker Ivan Acosta’s award-winning play El Súper, which gained critical and international success for its depiction of exiled Cubans in New York City, will be screened. Mr. Acosta will be in attendance and a discussion in English will follow. Iván Acosta is a playwright, filmmaker, and creative director originally from Santiago de Cuba, now in New York City. His creative endeavors include documentaries, plays, films, and books, and he’s served as writer, director, and producer, among other roles.

A small reception will follow the screening. Seating may be limited. Admission is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/1979/04/29/archives/the-screen-el-super-a-cubanamerican-tale-the-cast.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.

Equity speaker series to host panel on navigating immigrant relations in the current political climate

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The Center for Academic Equity at Tulane University is proud to present Border Li(n)es: Excluding, Extracting, and Expelling Immigrants in the Southern U.S. on September 25, 2018 at 7:00 PM as part of the Equity Speaker Series.

Following a summer of turbulent immigration relations in the United States, the Fall 2018 Equity Speaker Panel will focus on immigration on our Southern border and will feature specialists whose experiences vary from grassroots to professorial work. Panelists will include Josiah Heyman, Director of the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Ronald Martinez, New Orleans immigrant activist and spokesperson for the Congress of Day Laborers, Hiroko Kusuda, Clinical Professor and Director of Immigration Law at the Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice at Loyola, and Laila Hlass, Clinical Professor of Law at Tulane Law School and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

These four distinguished speakers will share the stage of Freeman Auditorium to discuss the drastic variation in immigrant relations across the national, regional, and local spaces and ways that members of American society may become engaged in or change the now toxic and polarized political climate. This inaugural discussion will be followed by a question and answer session.

See also Tulane New Wave for more information and a description of the event.




Cover photo from CNN story What the US-Mexico border looks like before Trump’s wall.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features Hispanic women artists' empowerment and identity

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation is proud to announce the opening of the groundbreaking exhibition Hispanic Women Making Art: Creative Empowerment and Identity. The exhibition will feature artists Verónica Bapé, Belinda Flores-Shinshillas, Ana Hernandez, Josephine Sacabo, Laura Velez and Luba Zygarewicz and is curated by Marcela Correa, MFA.

The opening reception will be held on September 26 from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM. The exhibition will be open beginning September 26 and continue through November 24, 2018. For more information, please visit the Mexican Cultural Institute website.

Cover photo is a work by Verónica Bapé from the series ABUNDANTE COSA 1 MES 1 ARTISTA.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.


Louisiana Archaeological Society to host talk by Francisco Estrada-Belli on the use of LiDAR in Maya archaelology

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The Louisiana Archaeological Society/Delta Chapter guest speaker series will be hosting Francisco Estrada-Belli, Research Assistant Professor in the Tulane University Department of Anthropology and the Middle American Research Institute for a talk titled The Scaling Factor: How Lidar Technology is Changing our views on Maya Agriculture and Settlement.

A new quantitative analysis of LiDAR data on agricultural features and settlement carried out since 2016 by a consortium of scholars working in Guatemala has generated a series of baseline facts on how much land was available for cultivation and how much land was developed by diverting water, terracing and other geoengineering methods. These data are coupled to more accurate population estimates on a scale that had never been attained before. The results of the study, co-led by Marcello Canuto, Thomas Garrison, and myself are now being published in “Science*:https://www.sciencemag.org/. Francisco Estrada-Belli will present an overview of the results with particular attention to his area of study, the Holmul region, where we made many unexpected finds.

Parking can be found along St. Charles Avenue, Walnut Street, Calhoun Street, and Loyola Avenue.

For additional questions, please visit the Louisiana Archaeological Society’s Delta Chapter event page.

Iván Acosta book presentation: With A Cuban Song in the Heart / Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón

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Iván Acosta will present his memoir, With a Cuban Song in the Heart/ Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón, published by Un-Gyve Press, 2017. At this event, Mr. Acosta will incorporate his favorite Cuban songs in a musical and historical journey. His book features artwork from 280 album covers in his private collection and weaves a rich narrative combining real life experiences from his childhood in Santiago, Cuba along with tidbits of local lore and historical references. His favorite songs will be performed by local performers during the presentation.
This fascinating presentation, starting at 6:00PM, will be held at Tulane University in the Freeman Auditorium of the Newcomb Art Building (in Newcomb Circle) New Orleans, LA, 70118. A book signing and reception will follow on Woodward Way, right outside the Freeman Auditorium and in the Newcomb Art Museum. The book will be available for purchase for $60.00.

This event is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/16/nyregion/public-lives-cuba-on-his-mind-the-dual-life-of-an-artist-exile.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.

K-12 Educator Workshop Celebrating 25 Years of the Américas Award with 2018 winners Ibi Zoboi and Duncan Tonatiuh

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This year marks the 25th year that the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs and CLASP will honor the work of the many authors, illustrators, publishers, educators, and readers of the award with 2018 award winners Ibi Zoboi and Duncan Tonatiuh.

Zoboi’s book, American Street is a complex and multi-layered story anchored around relationships and questions of loyalty. She will share her experiences writing this book and provide context for teaching this book in a high school classroom.

The second 2018 award winner by Duncan Tonatiuh, Danza is a magnificent celebration of Amalia Hernández, the dancer and choreographer who founded the famed Mexican dance company, el Ballet Folklórico de México. Tonatiuh will share with educators his unique illustrative style and engage participants in an exploration of Amalia Hernández and her impact in the world of dance. This picture book is the perfect book for every library.

The workshop will explore this year’s winners, providing guidance and resources that span the 25 years of the award. This special 25th anniversary workshop will focus on diversity and the role of community.

Co-sponsored by the national Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs (CLASP), Howard University, and Teaching for Change. Organized by the Center for Latin American Studies, Vanderbilt University and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.