Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Doctoral Fellowships and Teaching

As a condition of their fellowships, doctoral students serve as Teaching Assistants or work an equivalent amount of hours as a Research and Project Associate each semester during which they receive funding (see section on Center Service and Teaching). Teaching Assistants offer one course per semester: Latin American Studies 1010 in the Fall Semester and Latin American Studies 1020 in the Spring Semester. Both courses, though stand-alone courses in their own rights, represent a year-long introductory survey approach to the region based on an 8-thematic unit curriculum (4 units per semester). The Stone Center offers multiple sections of each of these introductory courses as lecture courses. The sections are taught during the weekday within the 8:00am – 5:00pm time period. Approximately half of the sections are offered according to the University’s standard 50 minute M-W-F lecture course structure and the other half according to its 75 minute T-TH lecture course structure. Most students find teaching these courses an important part of their professional preparation. For more information on teaching eligibility guidelines, please refer to the “Center Service and Teaching” section below, particularly the subsection on Teaching Assistantships.

The Stone Center has limits on the number of years doctoral students are eligible for financial aid. A student may not receive financial aid for more than four years. This means that the effective limit is two years for students entering the doctoral program with an M.A. degree in Latin American Studies from Tulane, two to three years for transfers from other Tulane departments, and four years for transfers from other universities. The only exception to this is the joint Ph.D. program in Latin American Studies and Art History where, because of the additional demands required to fulfill the requirements for both the Stone Center and the Department of Art, students may be eligible for up to five years of financial aid, depending on their individual circumstances.

Program Mission

Teaching in the Stone Center is considered a vital part of doctoral student’s preparation and often provides a crucial credential for securing later employment. The Center’s Assistant Director for Undergraduate Affairs serves as Undergraduate Teaching Coordinator and assists instructors in the preparation and teaching of courses. In addition to this training, Teaching Assistants are required to attend sessions on college teaching offered by the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Terms of Service

Ph.D. students with University Fellowships teach one class per semester or participate for 6 hours a week in the Research and Project Associates program.

Teaching Eligibility

In general, assignment to teach is made according to the following eligibility guidelines:

  • Students who have earned a Master’s Degree in Latin American Studies at Tulane are eligible to teach in their first year as a Doctoral Candidate.
  • Students who have earned a Master’s Degree in another discipline at Tulane, but whose disciplinary program had a predominant Latin American concentration, are also eligible to teach in their first year as a Doctoral Candidate.
  • Students who have earn a Master’s Degree at another university are eligible to teach only after completing two semesters in the Latin American Studies Doctoral Program.

Please note that teaching for the Center is neither an obligation nor a right of admission to the program. Doctoral Students may not actually be given a teaching assignment immediately upon becoming eligible. Teaching assignments may vary in timing from one student to the next depending on a number of factors. Such factors include the student’s familiarity and comfort with the University environment and with the Latin American Studies program, section availability compared to the total pool of TA-eligible Doctoral students, and the Graduate Advisor’s evaluation of a Doctoral student’s readiness to teach at a particular moment in the student’s professional development. While the Center hopes and expects that its Doctoral students will teach, we recognize that for certain students teaching may be neither appropriate nor advisable for a variety of reasons. Such determinations will be made through consultation with such students and with the best interests of the student and the overall Latin American Studies program in mind. Although every effort will be made to assign course sections with consideration for the TA’s own scheduling preferences and his or her own academic course schedule, TA’s are expected to be able to teach any section offered by the Stone Center.

Syllabus

The Stone Center’s Undergraduate Advisor maintains a file of syllabi used for the introductory Latin American Studies courses and works with our instructors to develop a syllabus adapted to their strengths and teaching styles. The syllabus is discussed in detail at regular TA meetings and training session.

Exams

Instructors are required to give mid-term and final examinations, but more frequent evaluation is extremely useful both for the instructor and the student. The university requires that a final examination be given at the time and in the place prescribed in the class schedule. Medical excuses must be presented within 24 hours after a final examination. At the end of classes for the semester the Registrar will send each instructor a notice of the final date to submit grades for classes.

Evaluations

Every Tulane course enrolling over five students must be evaluated by students at the end of the semester. This is an official University evaluation, which is coordinated by the Registrar’s Office and is administered online. Teaching Assistants should set aside a class period at the end of each semester of teaching, encourage students to bring their laptops to class, and have them complete the evaluation online in the classroom. The Undergraduate Advisor will review the evaluations and may use them as a basis for meeting with the Teaching Assistant and discussing areas of improvement.

Student Violations of Honor Code

The honor code is administered by Honor Boards and the Student Academic Judiciary Committee, both composed of students and faculty. The Honor Boards convene to hear cases when a violation of the Honor Code is alleged. The board considers the evidence, determines guilt or innocence, and recommends penalties.

The Honor Code states that in all work submitted for academic credit students are expected to represent themselves honestly. The presence of a student’s name on any work submitted in completion of an academic assignment is considered to be an assurance that the work and ideas are the result of the student’s own intellectual effort, stated in her or his own words and produced independently, unless clear and explicit acknowledgement of the sources for the work and ideas is included. This principle applies to papers, tests, homework assignments, artistic productions, laboratory reports, computer programs and other assignments. Students are expected to report to the instructor or associate dean any observed violations of the Honor Code. A copy of the complete Honor Code is available online or may be obtained form the office of the Dean of Liberal Arts.

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Upcoming Events

Hermes Mallea presenting Great Houses of Havana

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Hermes Mallea presenting Great Houses of Havana: A Century of Cuban Style
An insider’s tour of Havana’s exceptional houses built between 1860 and 1960 and their fascinating personal histories, alongside Havana’s architectural patrimony.

Lecture at 6:00 PM and book signing at 7:30 PM.
For more information visit www.nohhf.org

This presentation is sponsored by the NOHHF in collaboration with the New Orleans Museum of Art, Beatriz Ball, JW Marriott, Jahncke & Burns Architects, the Preservation Resource Center of New Orleans, Ileana and José Suquet, Tulane School of Architecture-Master of Preservation Studies and Tulane University-Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute

Teaching Haiti: K-12 Educator Workshop

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This educator workshop will explore the culture of Haiti, focusing on music and dance. This unique workshop focuses on an important, but often understudied area of the Caribbean, and will provide K-12 educators with exciting opportunities to diversify the classroom.

Participants will receive lunch, teaching materials and CEUs.

Check out LARC’s curriculum on Haitian Folktales or the Haiti part of the Day of the Dead Across the Americas to get ready for the workshop.

Special offer on registration!:
Bring a friend! Register with a colleague from the same institution and you can receive a 2 for 1 registration. Please register only one time and follow instructions on the registration form to provide your colleague’s information.

Schedule Coming Soon!

La Hora del Cuento: Bilingual Story Hour at the Children's Resource Center

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Join the Pebbles Center at the Children’s Resource Center branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

On April 10th at 4:30 PM we will be featuring the book Ada’s Violin, about an orchestra made of recycled instruments, and doing a craft.

Alumni & Friends of the Band Dinner

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Please join Barry Spanier, Director of Bands, Tulane University for the Alumni & Friends of the Band Dinner. The Tulane Concert Band 7th Annual Spring Concert will immediately follow at 7:30 pm in the Dixon Hall Theater. Explore the musical cultures of the Latin world. Feel the passionate rhythms and be transported by the sweeping melodies that have made this music beloved by audiences around the globe. Enjoy the repertoire of Latin composers and others: Malegueña, Amparito Roca, La Virgen de la Macarena, Libertango, Mambo, Danzon No. 2, Puebla de Los Angeles, El Camino Real and Bolero.

For more information, please contact Patricia McWhorter-Broussard 504.314.BAND or patmcwbr@tulane.edu
www.tulaneband.org

Exhibition Opening- Beyond the Canvas: Contemporary Art from Puerto Rico

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Join us on the evening of April 26 to celebrate the opening of Beyond the Canvas: Contemporary Art from Puerto Rico.

The exhibition features the work of five Puerto Rico-based artists spanning several generations who have each developed a process-driven approach to painting. They challenge the notion of the canvas as a flat surface, focusing firstly on its materiality as a site for intervention and manipulation, and secondly as a substrate for painted images. Beyond the Canvas coincides with the 100th anniversary of Puerto Ricans receiving U.S. citizenship and the impending referendum on statehood. MORE >

  • 5:30 PM — VIP/members reception. To join or renew email museum@tulane.edu.
  • 6:30 PM — Lecture with curator Warren James in conversation with Dr. Monica Ramirez-Montagut, Director, Newcomb Art Museum, and Dr. Edie Wolfe, SCLAS Assistant Director for Undergraduate Programs, Tulane University
  • 7:30 – 9 PM — Public reception

Beyond the Canvas will be accompanied by an installation envisioned, curated, and designed by Tulane students from LAST 6961 “Women, Community and Art in Latin America: Puerto Rico.” Co-taught by Edith Wolfe, Assistant Director of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and museum director and exhibition co-curator Monica Ramirez-Montagut, the class asks how Puerto Rican socially-engaged art and artists address problems of gender, sexuality, and other issues affecting women on the island. The student-curated exhibition will document citizen-led projects, including a community-run educational center in a low-income, industrial area of San Juan that organizes a local “theater of the oppressed”; the collective decoration of houses in the hillside El Cerro neighborhood, aimed at increasing visibility of marginalized populations; the recuperation of lost artisanal traditions through intergenerational workshops known as Escuelas Oficios (Trade Schools); participatory urban design projects that are restoring blighted properties in Santurce, and the reclaiming of public space through feminist street art and performance.

La Hora del Cuento: Pebbles Center Bilingual Spring Reading Series

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Celebrate and learn about Latin America with your kids through the Stone Center’s Pebble Center at the Algiers Regional branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

Second Tuesday of every month at 10:30 AM. All books are read in English and Spanish and readings are followed by an activity based on the book. Past books include Counting Ovejas, Drum Dream Girl, and Mango, Abuela, and Me. Readings are free and open to the public. Recommended ages 0 – 5 and parents!

Story Hour Dates/Themes

March 21 – TRANSPORTATION
The Wheels on the Bus Illustrated by Melanie Williamson and Written by The Amador Family

April 11 – ANIMALS
Los Pollitos by Susie Jaramillo

May 9 – LATIN AMERICAN CHILDREN’S SONGS
Elefantitos by Susie Jaramillo