Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Master of Arts in Latin American Studies Curriculum

Distribution Requirements

Degree requirements include 30 credit hours as follows: (1) a primary concentration (History, Anthropology, etc., etc.) of 12 hours, (2) a second supporting concentration of 6 hours, (3) a third supporting concentration, also of 6 hours (4) the Core Seminar (LAST 7000), and (5) one of the following options for the final 3 hours credit:

  • Option One: The M.A. thesis, written under the direction of a thesis director and approved by a faculty committee. Students register for thesis credit in the fourth semester (LAST 8990) and are required to participate in a thesis writing workshop under the direction of the Graduate Advisor. This is a graded course. A passing grade is assigned for the thesis by the Graduate Advisor if the student successfully defends his/her thesis by the end of the Spring semester. [NOTE: If a student plans to graduate in the Spring Semester of his/her second year of study, the thesis must be completed, defended, and submitted to the School of Liberal Arts in final form usually by the first week of April.] If the student has not completed and defended the thesis by the end of the Spring semester of the second year of studies, a grade of â’‘¬Å“Iâ’‘¬Â (Incomplete) will be reported until such time as the student completes the thesis AND applies to graduate. If the student fails to complete the thesis within one year of the end of the second year of study, the â’‘¬Å“Iâ’‘¬Â grade will convert to a failing grade.
  • Option Two: A three-hour course in theory or methodology in the primary concentration. This need not be a Latin American content course. For example, in Sociology, the relevant courses are â’‘¬Å“Intermediate Social Statisticsâ’‘¬Â and â’‘¬Å“Intermediate Sociological Methods;â’‘¬Â in Anthropology, â’‘¬Å“Field Methods in Social and Cultural Anthropology;â’‘¬Â and in Political Science, â’‘¬Å“The Conduct of Researchâ’‘¬Â and â’‘¬Å“Statistics for Political Scientists.â’‘¬Â Where a department does not have an appropriate offering, the Stone Center Graduate Advisor will help the student arrange an independent study project in the methodology of the primary concentration. This course must be taken by the end of the third semester.

Concentrations

The concentrations are usually departmental/disciplinary and are intended more as a guide to help organize a studentâ’‘¬’“¢s curriculum around a specific research project. Where a studentâ’‘¬’“¢s program suggests that there is an educational and qualitative logic, it is also possible to declare one synthetic concentration that combines courses from more than one department. Such a concentration might be, for example, â’‘¬Å“Cultural Studiesâ’‘¬Â or â’‘¬Å“Mexican Studies.â’‘¬Â Students are also encouraged, in consultation with the Graduate Advisor, to take courses that may fall outside of their concentration areas if such courses are critical to the development of specific research skills, tools, methods, or content necessary in the pursuit of their research agendas.

Language Requirement

The requirement for graduation with the M.A. in Latin American Studies is demonstrated competence in either Spanish or Portuguese. Students are expected to pass a language examination in Spanish or Portuguese during the first year of study. The required level of competence in Spanish and Portuguese corresponds to â’‘¬Å“intermediateâ’‘¬Â on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) scale. This competency is considered a minimum requirement. Students are encouraged to develop additional languages as needed by their research fields.

Currently, these language examinations are administered by Professors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese as assigned by that department. Students should contact the Department of Spanish and Portuguese directly for further information on the administration of these exams. Native Spanish and Portuguese speakers are exempt from this requirement.

Transfer of Credit

Upon entering the program a maximum of six credits (two courses) may be transferred from another department of Tulane or another University toward your Latin American Studies M.A. degree. However, students who do choose to transfer two courses will lose one semester of M.A. funding (limiting thesis writers to three semesters and non-thesis writers to two). To be considered for transfer credit toward an M.A. degree, graduate work done at another institution must carry a grade of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or better and must have been completed no more than four years from the date of first registration for graduate work at Tulane.

Acceptance of graduate credit for work done at other graduate institutions must be approved by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and by the Dean of the School of Liberal Arts. Although the official decision concerning the acceptance of transfer credit towards the Latin American Studies M.A. degree will be made only after the student has completed one semester of successful study in the program, the Stone Center Graduate Advisor can evaluate the transferability of previous coursework before the student enters the program. If you are planning to transfer credit, remember to contact your Graduate Advisor after you have completed your first semester in the degree program so that he may recommend your credit for transfer.

Independent Studies

Independent Studies can be an important part of your program if used properly and sparingly. Typically an independent project is created to fill an academic need or interest that is not being met by regular disciplinary offerings or to expand upon research begun in other courses but not fully completed. Ordinarily, the Graduate Advisor will not authorize students to take more than two Independent Studies courses during the course of their M.A. degree. Students may register for the independent study directly through the Latin American Studies program; but students should first attempt to register for the independent study through the department of the sponsoring faculty member. Please consult the Graduate Advisor for further information on registering for independent study.

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Upcoming Events

Screening of De Lo Mio at the New Orleans Film Festival

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies is proud to sponsor two screenings of De Lo Mio at the New Orleans Film Festival.

SAT OCT 19 | 3:45PM | BLUE ORLEANS THEATER (THE ADVOCATE)
MON OCT 21 | 11:00AM | BLUE ORLEANS THEATER (THE ADVOCATE)

Director Diana Peralta will be in attendance at both screenings.

Film Description

After a years-long absence, sisters Rita and Carolina finally return to their birthplace in the Dominican Republic to prepare their dead father’s childhood home for sale. There, they rejoin their brother Dante, their main link to the family back home. As they excavate the house’s literal and emotional junk, they discover that there’s more than years and miles separating them. In this affecting chamber piece, first-time director Diana Peralta zooms in past the postcard prettiness of the island setting, framing intimate scenes that raise big questions: whether a patriarch’s death severs a sibling bond or starts it anew, and how to square the longing for a home that’s an ocean away with the reality that you’ve forever left it behind.

The Stone Center will be offering a limited number of free tickets on a first-come, first-served basis. Please stay tuned for announcements on how to redeem these tickets.

Screening of Havana, From on High at the New Orleans Film Festival

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The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute is proud to sponsor two screenings of Havana, From on High at the New Orleans Film Festival.

THURS OCT 17 | 12:30PM | THE RANCH THEATER AT CAC
TUES OCT 22 | 3:45PM | TUBI THEATER AT CAC

Film Description

The sun rises over Havana, Cuba, and awakens not just a city, but the people who live on its rooftops. Amidst poverty and dilapidated buildings left by the Special Period‘€“the worst economic crisis the country has ever seen‘€“lie people with a deep love for the city and their towering views. Through sun-soaked visuals and interviews with rooftop dwellers, we get a sense of their hopes, history, and the reality of living in Cuba post‘€“Special Period. What begins as a portrait of everyday life becomes an exploration of the effects of socio-economic disarray and increased foreign influence on a fiercely independent nation. Despite their adversity and separation from the world, the rooftop dwellers of Havana, like all others, search for happiness.

The Stone Center will be offering a limited number of free tickets on a first-come, first-served basis. Please stay tuned for announcements on how to redeem these tickets.

Queerness within Latinx Dance & Food

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In honor of LGBTQ+ Hxstory Month, Latinx Heritage month, and OGSD LGBTQ+ Hxstroy & Celebration Days programs we invite you to Queerness within Latinx Dance & Food on Tuesday, October 22nd from 7-9:30 pm in LBC Rathskeller Lounge.

Join OGSD, TU Genté, Gender Sexuality Advisory Council (GSAC), The Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Gender & Sexuality Studies Program, and Newcomb Institute for gourmet tacos from Chef Melissa Araujo a Honduran Chef who is based in New Orleans and performances and workshop by Jose Richard Aviles.

Jose is a multi-media artist who draws from their identities as a Queer, Brown body, Angeleno native, and Scholar. Aviles’ work puts theory and practice in dialogue and their art is a result of their scholarly explorations and lived experience. Callejera is the embodiment of theories of Spatial Production and Aviles’ lived experience as a Pasajera (Bus Rider).

RSVP and learn more at the official FB event page.

Latin American Writers Series: Andrea Palet (Editorial Laurel)

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Editorial Director Andrea Palet presents the history, philosophy, and ongoing projects of Editorial Laurel, a publishing house founded in Santiago, Chile in 2014. Her presentation sheds light on the changing landscape of literature in the Americas today. It will be followed by a reception. This event will be held in Spanish.

About the Latin American Writers Series

This series brings together Latin America’s most representative creative voices and the editorial entrepreneurs that publish them. By way of interviews conducted by renowned Ecuadorian writer Gabriela Alemán and presentations of various editorial missions, the guests will shed light on a literary world shaped by the contemporary issues of the continent. Moving forward, their conversations will comprise the centerpiece of a digital archive that introduces their ideas to a global audience.

Este serie reúne a los autores más representativos de la escritura continental y los editores que los publican. A través de entrevistas con la reconocida escritora ecuatoriana Gabriela Alemán y presentaciones de proyectos editoriales, los invitados explorarán los vínculos entre el mundo literario y la realidad continental. Sus conversaciones se convertirán después en el eje de un archivo digital que busca llevar estas ideas a un público global.

About the Speaker

Andrea Palet is the founding editorial director of Editorial Laurel, established in 2014 in Santiago, Chile. Under her leadership, the house has released the works of more than 20 novelists, essayists, and chroniclers. Paleta also oversees the Master of Editing program at the Universidad de Diego Portales. A collection of her columns, Leo y olvido, was released in 2018 by Ediciones Bastante.

Bate papo!: Portuguese Conversation Hour

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A weekly hour of Portuguese conversation and tasty treats hosted by Prof. Megwen Loveless. All levels are welcome!

The theme for this semester will be Passion Fruit. So bring your sweet tooth to try this week’s homemade delicacy: Biscoito de maracujá.

K-12 Educator S.T.E.A.M Workshop: Teaching Central America at the Zoo

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Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies in collaboration with the Audubon Nature Institute will be hosting a K-12 educator workshop on Saturday, October 26, 2019. This workshop will focus on conservation efforts and environment of Central American rainforests. This workshop is a great way to learn how to bring real world science into your classroom. We will explore the zoo with Professor Kathy Jack, a primate behavioral ecologist who works on conservation efforts in Dry Forests of Costa Rica. Activities will incorporate a variety of sciences and other subjects including: art, environmental science, cultural components, anthropology, computer science and technology. While it is geared for middle and high school teachers, this workshop is open to all educators formal and informal.

Register here.