Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Summer in Costa Rica: Service Learning, Politics, & Internships
San José | May 20 – June 30, 2018

Summer in Costa Rica is a six-week program based at Tulane University’s own beautiful campus of CIAPA, a prestigious academic research institution in the midst of the capital city of San José. The CIAPA campus houses multiple lecture and seminar rooms where students will take two courses. Constant exposure to Spanish will help students develop stronger language communication skills at any level, including with their local family homestays. Students will embark on adventures to tropical rainforests, volcanoes, and beautiful beaches, with excursions to Manuel Antonio, Irazú, and Monteverde. Make friends with local Univeristy of Costa Rica students, and explore the charming city of San José in your free time!

Depending on their interests and needs, students will have the opportunity to choose from three course options being offered. Taught in English by Tulane faculty, the Social Justice Service-Learning course explores the notions of citizenship and concepts of social justice in Latin America from a theoretical perspective, and will be supplemented with a practical application in the community through a 40-hour Service Learning placement. The Social Justice Internship provides placement within a variety of local governmental and non-governmental entities that will host students as interns with varying levels of Spanish language skills. Students will have the opportunity to work within organizations promoting civic education, the protection of human rights, or school drop-out prevention. Central American Politics: Costa Rica will focus on the current state of Costa Rican politics and society by analyzing the social and political forces at play in the region, the challenges of its economic development, and its external interaction with the United States and other world regions. This course is taught in English by CIAPA staff.


  • LAST 3950 with LAST 3890 (4 credits): Social Justice Service Learning
  • LAST 4570 (3 credits): Social Justice Internship
  • POLC 3310* (3 credits): Central American Politics: Costa Rica
    *Course listing subject to change, but course content remains Political Science.

The cost of the five-week program is $5,800, which includes corresponding credits at Tulane (tuition), and housing/logistics fees, which include local family homestays with private room and three meals a day, medical insurance, transportation from the airport, and specialized tours and excursions. Airfare to/from San José (SJO), incidental costs, and extra meals and expenses are not included in the program cost.

Student applicants must be in good academic standing and have at least a current cumulative grade point average of 2.5. At least one semseter of Spanish language at Tulane is required, or equivalent from outside institutions. Non-Tulane students are welcome to apply, but should confirm with their home university that their credits will transfer.

Complete applications through the online application portal will include:

  • Student’s general and academic information
  • Personal statement of intent
  • Official copy of transcript
  • Copy of front page of VALID passport
  • Two letters of recommendation (at least one from a Spanish instructor)
  • $300 non-refundable deposit (by credit card online, OR by check made payable to Tulane University; dropped off or mailed to the Stone Center, attn. Laura Wise Person, 100 Jones Hall, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118.)

Click here to visit the online application via the Office of Study abroad. Non-Tulane students will be required to create an account.

Download a printable flyer for the program here.

For questions, please call 504-862-8629, or email to

View photos from past programs here!




All Events

Upcoming Events

Lecture with Rafael Ledezma, Greenleaf Fellow

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk titled, “Nueva cronología del modelo primario-exportador de Honduras, 1880-1930/A New Chronology of the Primary Commodity Exports Model in Honduras, 1880-1930” by Rafael Ledezma, the 2017-2018 Richard E. Greenleaf Fellow at the Latin American Library.

The talk will be in SPANISH. All are invited for refreshments afterwards.

Las explicaciones convencionales sobre la historia política y económica de Honduras sostuvieron que, entre 1880 y 1930, el país fue un simple exportador de banano, y que su economía nacional no se benefició de este sector porque fue controlado por empresas extranjeras (United Fruit Co, Cuyamel Fruit Co y Standard Fruit Co). No sorprende, por lo tanto, que a Honduras se le haya conocido como la “banana republic” por excelencia. En esta ponencia presentaré, como hipótesis, una nueva cronología de la historia hondureña de ese periodo, que consiste en tres fases que definieron modos distintos de vinculación al mercado internacional, y que van más allá de la comercialización del banano. Ahondaré en aspectos tales como la actividad marítima y portuaria, con cuáles otros países, además de Estados Unidos, tuvo relaciones comerciales, y cuáles productos vendió y compró del exterior. Se seleccionó este periodo porque, recientemente, la historia económica en América Latina lo está estudiando desde distintos enfoques, para así aportar nuevas visiones sobre los problemas del desarrollo económico en el largo plazo, y los orígenes históricos de la desigualdad social en la región.

Conventional explanations of the political and economic history of Honduras held that, between 1880 and 1930, the country only exported bananas, and that its national economy did not benefit from this sector because it was controlled by foreign companies (United Fruit Co, Cuyamel Fruit Co y Standard Fruit Co). It is therefore not surprising that Honduras has come to be known as the “banana republic” par excellence. In my talk, I will present as a hypothesis a new chronology of Honduran history of this period consisting of three phases that defined different modes of linkages to international markets and that go beyond the commercialization of bananas. I will examine issues such as maritime and port activity; the countries besides the United States with which Honduras had commercial ties; and the products that were bought and sold abroad. I chose to focus on this period because the economic history of Latin America has recently begun to be studied from new perspectives that have refocused our understanding of long-term economic development and the historical origins of social inequality in the region.

Rafael Ledezma hails from Costa Rica. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in History from Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica (2006); a Master’s degree in Applied History from El Colegio de México (2016); and is currently a PhD candidate in History from that university. His research and publications focus on the history of agriculture and the environment in 20th century Costa Rica, and the economic history of Honduras between 1880-1930.

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

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Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Office of Multicultural Affairs: International Food and Music Festival

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The International Food and Music Festival is a tradition for Tulane University and the surrounding New Orleans community. It is not possible without the participation of the international community at Tulane. We need your help to represent your culture, country, or community. Share food, crafts, cultural history, language, performance, and have fun at this beautiful outdoor festival.

This event is FREE for all Tulane faculty, staff and students. You must present your Splash Card. Non-affiliated Tulane attendees can purchase tickets here.

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here for more information and registration.

If you have questions, email or

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pave

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Bate Papo! End your Friday afternoon on the Jones Hall patio with a classic Brazilian layer dessert. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at