Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Application to the Graduate Program

Students who wish to be admitted to the School of Liberal Arts graduate program in Latin American Studies should contact the Graduate Advisor in the Stone Center for more information on the application process. The completed online application is available through the School of Liberal Arts at the following webpage. Applications must be submitted by February 1 for admission for the next academic year.

Tulane’s standards for admission are very high. We seek applicants who have developed the critical capacities for advanced work and are especially interested in attracting new students who will go on to complete doctoral degrees. We also seek students who have already developed the language skills needed for advanced work.

The School of Liberal Arts will not consider any student for admission until all the following documents, plus the application fee, have been received:

  • completed application form
  • three completed recommendation forms
  • official transcripts of all undergraduate records and of any previous graduate work
  • a statement of purpose outlining career objectives and a potential research program not to exceed 2-3 typed, double-spaced pages
  • an official score report for the Graduate Record Examination General Test. All transcripts and other documents and material required for application for admission become the property of the School of Liberal Arts and are not returnable.

In addition to the School of Liberal Arts requirements, the Stone Center recommends the submission of examples of written work, which may be submitted as additional materials as part of the online application. Information about language ability should be included in the applicant’s formal “Statement of Purpose.” A good working knowledge of Spanish and/or Portuguese is essential. Students are expected to pass a language examination in Spanish or Portuguese during the first year of study. The required level of competence in Spanish and Portuguese corresponds to intermediate-high on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) scale. This competency is considered a minimum requirement. Students are encouraged to develop additional languages as needed by their research fields.

Applications are first received by the Stone Center Graduate Advisor. A Center admissions committee consisting of Tulane Latinamericanists representing various disciplines considers individual credentials. This committee begins reviewing applications in mid-February, and makes recommendations about admission and fellowship/scholarship offers to the School of Liberal Arts Dean. The Stone Center Graduate Advisor will contact applicants informally by email regarding admissions decisions; and the School of Liberal Arts will follow up by notifying applicants formally of such decisions by uploading a letter of acceptance or denial on the online application system. Acceptance letters will explain the financial and academic terms of Tulane’s offer. Applicants are also welcome to contact the Stone Center Graduate Advisor by phone to discuss details of an admission offer.

Admission is on the basis of academic accomplishments and potential, regardless of race, sex, color, religion, national/ethnic origin, citizenship, marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or veteran status.

Financial Aid and Fellowship/Scholarships

Application for Fellowship/Scholarship consideration is accomplished simply by virtue of submitting a completed application for admission by the regular February 1 deadline. Fellowships/Scholarships generally include a tuition waiver and a modest living stipend; and Fellowship/Scholarship decisions are made at the same time as admissions decisions. Applicants will be notified of any Fellowship/Scholarship offers at the same time as they are notified of their offer of admission. Eligible students are also able to apply separately for federal or state-administered student loans and grants programs through the Tulane Financial Aid office. The Stone Center does not manage or oversee such financial aid programs; and accepted students should direct inquiries about such programs to the Tulane Financial Aid office.

GRE

All applicants for admission, including those applying to any of the joint degree programs, must take at their own expense the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The test scores will be used, along with the other application materials, to determine eligibility for admission and to aid in counseling the applicant after admission. Students should write directly to the Graduate Record Examination, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6000 to request information on the date of the exam in your city or state. For more information regarding the GRE, potential applicants may also visit the GRE website.

Non-Native English-Speaking Students

An applicant for admission who is not a native speaker of English must present satisfactory evidence of sufficient competence in English in reading comprehension, writing, verbal ability and oral comprehension. Ordinarily, the applicant will demonstrate competence by presenting an acceptable score on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), with a composite minimum score of 100 generally acceptable for admission. Applicants who do not meet this score requirement but are otherwise exceptionally qualified may be granted provisional admission with the stipulation that said students take an ESL course for the first semester in residence and then retest in the Winter before being allowed to continue study at Tulane. For information about these exams, write TOEFL/TSE Services, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, or visit their website.

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Upcoming Events

The Broad Theater to host Educator Night with viewing of the film ROMA

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On Friday, December 14 at 6:45 PM, please join your local New Orleans educators for a New Orleans Educator Night where educators may enjoy a special discounted viewing of the film ROMA at the Broad Theater.

The most personal project to date from Academy Award-winning director and writer Alfonso Cuarón (Gravity, Children of Men, Y Tu Mamá También), ROMA follows Cleo (Yalitza Aparicio), a young domestic worker for a family in the middle-class neighborhood of Roma in Mexico City. Delivering an artful love letter to the women who raised him, Cuarón draws on his own childhood to create a vivid and emotional portrait of domestic strife and social hierarchy amidst political turmoil of the 1970s.

Educators will be able to purchase a $15 package, which includes a ticket, draft wine or beer or well cocktail, and a small popcorn. Educators must present their IDs. As the film screening is open to the public, educators must say they are attending Educator Night with the Stone Center for Latin American Studies to receive the discount. Tickets will be available on a first come, first serve basis.

La Hora del Cuento: Fall Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

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This fall, join us for La hora del cuenta bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday, August 25 until Saturday, December 29. Children and parents are welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, September 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 3
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 1
10:30 AM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, August 25
10:30 AM

Saturday, September 22
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 27
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 24
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 29
10:30 AM

Stone Center for Latin American Studies to host 11th annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 11th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on Saturday, January 26, 2019. The deadline to apply for the workshop is January 15, 2019.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 15, 2019, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraphy statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features photographs showcasing Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in conjunction with PhotoNOLA 2018 will be showcasing a photographic exhibition titled Diego and Frida: A Halfway Smile from December 7, 2018 through February 15, 2019.

The opening reception will be held on December 7, 2018 from 6:00 PM through 9:00 PM.

The exhibition Diego and Frida, A Halfway Smile consists of personal photographs through which the wonderful world shared by Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo is revealed. One of the most controversial couples in the history of art in Mexico, united for almost 25 years, their relationship is marked by an infinity of encounters and disagreements. This axis of love witnessed innumerable contacts, closeness, complicity and deep friendships with great personalities of the time. It is through the images captured by friends like Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Nicolas Murray and Edward Weston that different stages of the relationship, life, pain and death of Frida and Diego are presented.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.

16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium: The Ancient Maya and Collapse

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The Middle American Research Institute, in collaboration with Tulane’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, New Orleans Museum of Art, and Mexican Consulate in New Orleans, is proud to announce the 16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium beginning on Thursday, February 14, and concluding on Sunday, February 17, 2019. This year’s conference The Center Could Not Hold: The Ancient Maya and Collapse will explore recent developments in Maya studies as they relate to the broader topic of collapse. Speakers and workshops will address the issue of political decline over the span of ancient Maya prehistory. These researchers will help us address the collapse in a multi-disciplinary fashion and bring attention to recent research in the region.

On Friday, February 15, at 6:00 PM, the keynote address will be given by Jeremy A. Sabloff, External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, of the University of Pennsylvania. In his talk Is “Collapse” a Useful Term in Understanding Pre-Columbian Maya History?, Dr. Sabloff considers how the term “collapse” has, in recent years, become quite controversial, and argues that there is good reason to question the utility of this loaded word going forward. This keynote talk will focus on understandings of the late 8th and early 9th centuries CE cultural processes and environmental events in the Maya Lowlands that culminated in what has often been seen as a political collapse. Moreover, the talk will examine whether such understanding can help illuminate comparable trends at other times in Maya history and in other complex societies in general.

Since 2002, the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University has hosted a weekend of talks and workshops dedicated to the study of the Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. This yearly meeting has called upon scholars from a wide spectrum of specialties including archaeology, art history, cultural anthropology, epigraphy, history, and linguistics to elucidate the many facets of this fascinating Mesoamerican culture. In developing a broad approach to the subject matter, the conference aims to draw the interest of a wide ranging group of participants from the expert to the beginner.

To view the schedule, registration, and additional information, please visit the Tulane Maya Symposium website.

2019 Global Read Webinar Series: Diversity in children's literature for the classroom

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This spring, the World Area Book Awards (Américas Award, Africana Book Award, Middle East Book Award, South Asia Book Award, and the Freeman Book Award) will sponsor a free 60 minute webinar on a book recognized by one of the awards and facilitate a discussion with the author on how to incorporate the book into the classroom.

The 2019 Global Read Webinar Series will focus on the theme diversity in children’s literature. The webinar will be recorded and archived online and have accompanying curricula to correspond with the book.

To register and learn more information about the Spring 2019 series, please visit:
internationalizingsocialstudies.blog

Webinar Schedule

January
Middle East Book Award

February
Africana Book Award

March
Américas Book Award

April
Freeman Book Award

May
South Asia Book Award and picture books from all book awards