Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Summer 2011

Through the Lens: Teaching about Latin America through Film
June 5 – June 10, 2011

The Latin American Resource Center and Vanderbilt’s Center for Latin American Studies will collaborate to offer a week-long institute on Latin America for high school teachers. The institute will be held on the campus of Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. Teachers will study different aspects of Latin America through feature films and documentaries with specialized faculty from Tulane, Vanderbilt, and Millsaps. Enriching their knowledge of Latin America, teaches will develop curricula for increased coverage of Latin America in their school. Housing & per diem allowance for food as well as CEUs will be provided.

Learn more about the films screened at the institute and resources developed from the institute by clicking here.

Spring 2011

Coffee, Culture, and Community Development Teacher Workshop
March 17, 2011
8:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Roosevelt Hotel, New Orleans, LA

In collaboration with Vanderbilt University’s Center for Latin American Studies, Institute for Coffee Studies, Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the National Coffee Association L present a K-12 teacher workshop in coordination with the NCA centennial convention March 17-19, 2011 at The Roosevelt Hotel.

This workshop will introduce teachers to the history of coffee around the world and explore the industry within Latin America. Participants will hear from acclaimed author Mark Pendergrast as well as receive a copy of his recent book Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How it Transformed Our World. Coffee roaster and Latin American Studies educator Elizabeth Van Sant will trace coffee through Latin America and work with teachers on preparing hands-on and engaging activities to work into a curriculum on Latin America and/or Geography. This workshop is open to all K-12 teachers seeking to engage their students in the world of coffee. It is recommended that all teachers attend the public symposium, Coffee, Culture & Community Development immediately following the workshop.

Cost of participation is $15 and includes lesson plans, Pendergrast’s book, parking, and lunch. All teachers may receive professional development CEUs for full participation from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

K-12 Maya Teacher Workshop
February 17, 2011
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Workshop on the ancient Maya. Featuring a session called Classroom archaeology: Methods used to understand the lives of the ancient Maya by Diane Davies, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Anthropology. This session will discuss how to teach the subject of archaeology in the classroom in reference to the ancient Maya civilization. A general background to archaeology and what archaeologists do will be given, followed by techniques that archaeologists use to aid in the understanding of how the ancient Maya lived. The second session Mayan Lives in 21st Century Guatemala, by Judith Maxwell, Professor of Anthropology, will discuss the modern Maya. Mayan peoples of Guatemala count their friends on Facebook as well as in base twenty. They carry cellphones, often in handwoven pouches designed for that purpose. They surf the internet, download and upload music, text-message and e-mail. They may commute to work either in urban offices, street markets, or local fields and sweatshops. They may worship in Catholic or Protestant Churches as well as on hillsides. They have recently won the right to give their children Mayan names and to ask that their children be educated, at least partially, in their own languages. Mayan activists have strategically deployed a checklist of essential Mayan traits to argue for their collective and human rights (Mayan cosmovision, Mayan language, Mayan dress). In this session, we will explore this trait list and some “traditional“ cultural arenas, situating them within the modern socio-political context.




All Events

Upcoming Events

Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture

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Join Dr. Emily Greenwood as she will be speaking about Greek language/literature, slavery, and the “politics of the human” when she delivers the Dennis A. Georges Lecture in Hellenic Culture.

Emily Greenwood is Professor and Chair of the Classics Department at Yale University where she also holds a joint appointment in African American Studies. She is one of the pre-eminent thinkers on Greek historiography of her generation as well as the leading figure in re-evaluating the legacy of Graeco-Roman culture in colonial and post-colonial contexts. In addition to her book Afro-Greeks: Dialogues Between Anglophone Caribbean Literature and Classics in the Twentieth Century (Oxford 2010) [Joint winner of the Runciman Prize], she has published over a dozen articles and book chapters that investigate the rich and nuanced reception of ancient Greek literature in the African Diaspora, especially in Caribbean literature.

Newcomb Art Museum to host María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for Gallery Talk

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Join us at the Newcomb Art Museum in welcoming Mexican artists María José de la Macorra and Eric Peréz for a noontime gallery talk as they discuss the current exhibition Clay in Transit: Contemporary Mexican Ceramics (which features works by María José de la Macorra) and the focus and process of their work. The talk is free and open to the public.

The Newcomb Art Museum is featuring two ceramic exhibitions entitled Clay in Transit featuring contemporary Mexican ceramics and Clay in Place featuring Newcomb pottery and guild plus other never-before-exhibited pieces from the permanent collection.The exhibit presents the work of seven Mexican-born sculptors who bridge the past and present by creating contemporary pieces using an ancient medium. The exhibit will feature works by Ana Gómez, Saúl Kaminer, Perla Krauze, María José Lavín, María José de la Macorra, Gustavo Pérez, Paloma Torres.

Exhibition curator and artist Paloma Torres explains, “In this contemporary moment, clay is a borderline. It is a material that has played a critical role in the development of civilization: early man used clay not only to represent spiritual concerns but also to hold food and construct homes.” While made of a primeval material, the exhibited works nonetheless reflect the artists’ twenty-first-century aesthetics and concerns as well as their fluency in diverse media—from painting and drawing to video, graphic design, and architecture.

The exhibit will run from January 18, 2018, through March 24, 2018. For more information on the exhibit and the artists, please visit the Newcomb Art Museum’s website.

Clay in Transit is presented in collaboration with the Consulate of Mexico.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Jennifer Wooster (NC ’91), Lora & Don Peters (A&S ’81), Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University, Andrew and Eva Martinez, and the Newcomb Art Museum advisory board

Why Marronage Still Matters: Lecture with Dr. Neil Roberts

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What is the opposite of freedom? Dr. Neil Roberts answers this question with definitive force: slavery, and from there he unveils powerful new insights on the human condition as it has been understood between these poles. Crucial to his investigation is the concept ofmarronage—a form of slave escape that was an important aspect of Caribbean and Latin American slave systems. Roberts examines the liminal and transitional space of slave escape to develop a theory of freedom as marronage, which contends that freedom is fundamentally located within this space.In this lecture, Roberts will explore how what he calls the “post-Western” concept and practice of marronage—of flight—bears on our world today.

This event is sponsored by the Kathryn B. Gore Chair in French Studies, Department of French and Italian.
For more information contact Ryan Joyce at or Fayçal Falaky at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

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Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at