Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

General Resources on Latin America

Dumbarton and Oaks Research Library and Collection
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection supports research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The institute disseminates knowledge through its own publications and online resources.

Google Arts and Culture: Latino Cultures in the US
Latino Cultures in the US is one of the largest digital collections of Latino art, culture, and history featuring more than 2,500 pieces of art through 90 exhibits. Users are able to take virtual tours of museums and historic sites, and access collections that showcase Latino art, influential figures, and defining moments in Latino history.

International Education Week
International Education Week (IEW), November 12-16, is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide.

The Latin American Library – Tulane University
The Latin American Library has an impressive collection of rare printed materials, manuscripts, Latin American government publications, one of the few Latin American image archives in the country, and over 2,000 rubbings of Maya relief sculpture. Among many other unique holdings, the collection includes over 4,500 maps and broadsides, a large number of historic newspapers, original drawings by William Spratling and other silver designers from Taxco, Mexico, and substantial collections of printed ephemera. Most holdings are in English, Spanish or Portuguese although many other languages are also represented.

The Latin American Library Primary Sources – Tulane University There are a plethora of resources on the web to find digitized printed books, manuscripts, newspapers, images, archival documents, music, film, and video with Latin American & Caribbean content. This website contains links to digitalized content organized by content, geographic area, and theme. For additional help, contact Rachel Stein, the LAL Research & Instruction Librarian.

Latin & Spanish New Orleans – Tulane University
The Latin & Spanish New Orleans is a collection of resources to help educators locate sources on present and past connections between the Crescent City and Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain. For additional help, contact Rachel Stein, the LAL Research & Instruction Librarian.

Sources and General Resources on Latin America
Oberlin College’s website compiles many resources on Latin America into one place accessible for all teachers and students.

Smithsonian Latino Center
The Smithsonian Latino Center provides interactive and innovative opportunities to enhance life-long learning and increase access and awareness to the Smithsonian’s Latino collections and resources in the arts, sciences, and humanities. The SLC offers youth and professional development programs, K-12 school programs and workshops, family programming, online resources, and downloadable bilingual teacher and student materials. These programs and resources teach the public about the untold stories of Latinos in America.

National Endowment for the Humanities: Hispanic Heritage Month
Through EDSITEment and NEH-funded resources, students can explore the history of Hispanic culture in America by accessing ongoing projects, web series, curriculum units, and featured lessons and websites.

The Maya Hieroglyphic Codices
This site features a searchable translation and analysis of four codices (screenfold books) painted by Maya scribes before the Spanish conquest in the early 16th century. The codices contain information about Maya beliefs and rituals, as well as everyday activities, all framed within an astronomical and calendrical context.

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database: Voyages
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 36,000 slaving voyages that forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. The actual number is estimated to have been as high as 12.5 million. The database and the separate estimates interface offer researchers, students and the general public a chance to rediscover the reality of one of the largest forced movements of peoples in world history.

Resources for Teaching about the Americas/Latin American Database – University of New Mexico
The Latin America Data Base (LADB)is the longest running, premier, exclusively on-line, English language news service about Latin America. LADB produces three weekly electronic publications (Sourcemex, NotiCen and NotiSur) and maintains an on-line searchable data base of over 24,000 articles as well as Latin American journals.

Handbook of Latin American Studies
This database contains bibliographic records found in the Handbook of Latin American Studies (HLAS) from the 1970s to the present. HLAS includes annotated citations for books, journal articles, book chapters, conference papers, maps and atlases, and e-resources.

Art Resources

Latin American Visual Online Repository is American University’s image repository on Latin America. For educational use only.

ArtsEdge
The Kennedy Center’s free digital resource for teaching and learning in, through and about the arts. This link highlights lesson ideas on Latin America but includes many more ideas on the site.

New York Public Library digital collections is an excellent collection of documents, images, and more on a wide variety of topics.

Library of Congress digital collections contains images of historic events, historic documents, and more about a variety of topics.

Language Resources

Language Resource Centers
The website of all National Language Resource Centers. Provides links to a wide variety of resource centers with curricula and information about languages. Some teaching resources also available on the website.

National Heritage Language Resource Center
The National Heritage Language Resource Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, is a joint project of the UCLA Center for World Languages and the University of California Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching. Its mission is to develop effective pedagogical approaches for teaching heritage language learners, first by creating a research base, and then by pursuing curriculum design, materials development, and teacher education.

Zambombazo
Spanish teacher Zachary Jones has created a new website that features a wide range of activities based on authentic cultural products, including music, comic strips, humor, film, news, TV, and radio.

Science Resources

Bureau of Land Managment
The BLM presents a set of resources for teachers and students which involve environmental, paleontological, and archaeological scenarios. Includes lesson plans, opportunities for professional development with the BLM, and classroom resources.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
A bilingual (Spanish/English) set of resources about tropical ecology and the environment.

The Globe Program
The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program that promotes and supports students, teachers, and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based investigations of the environment. Partners in the project include NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation.

Rainforest Alliance
Includes virtual visits to Latin American rainforests; online simulated games; stories about the rainforest in Spanish, Portuguese and English; printable activities, and fact books about rainforest species.

Social Studies Resources

Asia Society
Great website for schools and teachers trying to develop global competence among students and internationalize the curriculum.

Maya Lords of Time Educators Guide
A guide to the Maya from the University of Pennsylvania.

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian, a branch of the Smithsonian Museum, has resources for the classroom based on items in their collection. Particularly useful resources include their curriculum and interactive games about the Maya and an interactive online display of items from the Museum Collection from around the world, Infinity of Nations.

New Populations, Louisiana Folklife
The New Populations branch of the Louisiana Folklife Program examines cultural communities and traditions within Louisiana. Their focus is on documenting traditions of peoples from other countries/cultures who reside in Louisiana. Resources concerning traditions of peoples from around the world, including Latin America are available on their website. Information concerning Latin America includes pages on Cuban music and festivals ; Garifuna culture ; Guatemalan food and music ; Honduran identity ; Latino/Hispanic food, traditions, music, and experiences ; Mexican celebrations ; Nicaraguan traditions ; and a variety of other topics.

Patolli
Patolli is a board game played by Maya and Aztec peoples in archaeological times. Various resources for downloading on line versions of Patolli games are available. These include an Iphone ap which also provides a description of the game with details on how to play. A fun way to introduce your students to important aspects of Aztec world views and religious beliefs!

Smithsonian Olmec Resources
A great resource for learning about the Olmec, an early Pre-Columbian people in the Gulf Area of Mexico, with excellent images.

TakingITGlobal
An interactive website engaging the online community with global issues. Play the interactive, online game, “Ayiti, The Cost of Life” developed to learn more about Haiti

Multiple Subject Areas

Archaeology Institute of America’s Interactive Dig
The Archaeology Institute of America has a variety of interactive on-line activities about archaeology and archaeological digs both in Latin America and around the world. An excellent resource for those wishing to integrate science, math, and social studies in teaching about Latin American content.

Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs
CLASP features select curricula about Latin America from member institutions on this page. A good place to start looking for curricula on a variety of Latin American topics.

Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) connects people to the riches held within America’s libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions. All of the materials found through DPLA—photographs, books, maps, news footage, oral histories, personal letters, museum objects, artwork, government documents, and so much more—are free and immediately available in digital format.

EDSITEment
The National Endowment for the Humanities houses a wealth of diverse resources featuring Latin America on this site.

Latin American Visual Repository
A resource of images from throughout Latin America for use by scholars and educators.

National Geographic Education
Mapping and other resources from all areas of the world and for all grade levels and subjects.

Smithsonian Anthropology Teaching Activities
The Anthropology wing of the Smithsonian has a variety of teaching resources, including lesson plans, on subject areas as diverse as archaeology, ethnography, evolution, and primates. They also have information on the Maya and Mali. An excellent and diverse group of resources.

Global Competency in Education

Global Competency in the K-12 Classroom. A resource introducing global competency and how to introduce it into the K-12 classroom.

Engaging the World A website devoted to providing information about global competency and resources for achieving it in the classroom.

If you would like to make a recommendation for a website to be added to the LARC featured sites listing, please send a link and a description to crcrts@tulane.edu.

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Upcoming Events

La Hora del Cuento: Fall Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

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This fall, join us for La hora del cuento bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday, August 25 until Saturday, December 29. Children and parents are welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, September 1
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 6
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 3
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 1
10:30 AM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, August 25
10:30 AM

Saturday, September 22
10:30 AM

Saturday, October 27
10:30 AM

Saturday, November 24
10:30 AM

Saturday, December 29
10:30 AM

Tulane Ph.D. student Diego Matadamas Gomora to present on the history of the Aztecs at the Mexican Cultural Institute

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The New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans will be hosting a presentation titled A Brief History of the Aztecs by Tulane University Ph.D. student and archaeologist Diego Matadamas Gomora on January 12, 2019.

Diego Matadamas Gomora is a Ph.D. student at Tulane University. He is interested in the art and ritual life of the Aztecs. He earned his bachelor’s degree in archaeology at the National School of Anthropology and History in Mexico City.

The Aztecs are one of the most famous pre-Hispanic cultures in Mexico. They founded the city of Tenochtitlan in AD 1325 on a small island in the middle of a lake and became the most powerful empire in Mesoamerica. They left a large corpus of archaeological remains that show the development of their society. For their part, the European priests and conquerors who arrived in the city in AD 1519 were surprised by the beauty and complexity of the Aztec religion. For this reason they wrote numerous chronicles and with the natives produced valuable pictorial manuscripts.

This talk will explore this fascinating society to see the evolution of the Aztecs from their origins as hunter-gatherers until the creation of the great empire that dominated a vast territory. We will see that archaeology becomes the primary discipline to discover the traces left by the Aztecs and to prove that the power, political control, rituals, and richness were sometimes much more amazing than the Europeans described.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.

Stone Center for Latin American Studies to host 11th annual Workshop on Field Research Methods

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for the 11th Annual Weekend Workshop on Field Research Methods on Saturday, January 26, 2019. The deadline to apply for the workshop is January 15, 2019.

How will you get the data you need for your thesis or dissertation? Do you envision immersing yourself for months in the local culture, or tromping the hills and farms seeking respondents? Sorting through dusty archives? Observing musicians at work in the plaza? Downloading and crunching numbers on a computer? For any of these approaches: How might you get there, from here?

This workshop aims to help you approach your data collection and analysis for your thesis or dissertation topic, and to adapt and refine your topic to be more feasible. You will take your research project ideas to the next stop—whatever that may be, include raising travel grants. Learn to:

  • Plan more efficiently, feasible, and rewarding fieldwork
  • Prepare more compelling and persuasive grant proposals
  • Navigate choices of research methods and course offerings on campus
  • Become a better research and fieldwork team-member

Format
This is an engaged, hands-on, informal workshop. Everyone shares ideas and participates. We will explore and compare research approaches, share experiences and brainstorm alternatives. You will be encouraged to think differently about your topic, questions, and study sites as well as language preparation, budgets, and logistics. The participatory format is intended to spark constructive new thinking, strategies, and student networks to continue learning about (and conducting) field research.

Who is leading this?
Laura Murphy, PhD, faculty in Global Community Health and Behavioral Sciences, and affiliate faculty to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

Who is this for?
This workshop is targeted to Stone Center graduate students as well as graduate students from other programs (GOHB, CCC, humanities, sciences, and others) if space is available. The workshop will be particularly helpful for those who envision research with human subjects.

Sign up
Sign up as soon as you can! Apply by January 15, 2019, at the latest to confirm your stop. Send an email with the following details:

  • Your name
  • Department and Degree program
  • Year at Tulane
  • Prior experience in research, especially field research
  • Academic training in research design and methods
  • Include a 1-paragraph statement of your current research interests and immediate plans/needs (i.e. organize summer field research)

Light breakfast and lunch will be provided. Not for credit.

For more information and/or to apply: Contact Laura Murphy or Jimmy Huck.

Call for submissions: City, Community, and Culture Symposium VOICES

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The City, Culture, and Community (CCC) program at Tulane University is now accepting submissions for the 2019 spring symposium to be held on February 9, 2019. The deadline to submit a proposal is December 21, 2018. The 2019 symposium, VOICES: Visibility, Orientation, Identity, Creativity, Environment, Spaces, seeks to understand creative approaches to how inequalities are negotiated: socially, culturally, and institutionally.

The symposium is looking for research that explores creative approaches to agency, institutional organization, and cultural production and consumption within complex social systems. What are the current issues facing our communities, institutions, and cities? How can we be creative and inclusive in our approach? We are interested in how scholars frame these questions in regards to race, gender, sexuality, and class. This symposium invites scholars to present work from a variety of disciplines, perspectives, theoretical frameworks, and methodologies. As the academy continues to evolve, interdisciplinarity proves more and more a necessity. This symposium intends to create an interdisciplinary space that can bring together scholars, practitioners, students, and community members to engage across lines and extend current conversations around agency, resilience, and social justice across the globe.

The keynote speaker, Dr. Ernesto Martinez, is an Associate Professor in Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon. In his keynote address Queer Arousals in Contexts of Racialized Harm, Dr. Martinez conducts an intersectional analysis of the ways that queer men of color negotiate epistemic injustice through the creation and consumption of film, literature, and art. His research interests include queer ethnic studies, women of color feminisms, US Latinx literature and culture, and literary theory. He is the author of On Making Sense: Queer Race Narratives of Intelligibility (Stanford UP, 2012) and The Truly Diverse Faculty: New Dialogues in American Higher Education. (Palgrave, 2014). Along with his academic achievements, Dr. Martinez also writes bilingual Latinx children’s books, produces films (La Sarentata, 2017), and serves as a board member for the Association for Jotería Arts, Activism, and Scholarship (AJAAS), a queer Latinx grassroots organization dedicated to producing art and analyzing culture and politics in the context of activism.

Conference submissions are open to graduate students, outstanding undergraduates, educators, and practitioners. The symposium is a forum to showcase original research, theory expansion, innovative analysis, practical applications, and case studies. We welcome unpublished journal articles, area exam sections, dissertation chapters, working papers, and other forms of research analysis. As the space is intended to be for workshopping and dialoguing, literature reviews will not be considered. Presentations will be organized either in panels or individually.

The submission deadline is December 21, 2018. Any questions should be directed to tulaneccc@gmail.com.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features photographs showcasing Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in conjunction with PhotoNOLA 2018 will be showcasing a photographic exhibition titled Diego and Frida: A Halfway Smile from December 7, 2018 through February 15, 2019.

The opening reception will be held on December 7, 2018 from 6:00 PM through 9:00 PM.

The exhibition Diego and Frida, A Halfway Smile consists of personal photographs through which the wonderful world shared by Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo is revealed. One of the most controversial couples in the history of art in Mexico, united for almost 25 years, their relationship is marked by an infinity of encounters and disagreements. This axis of love witnessed innumerable contacts, closeness, complicity and deep friendships with great personalities of the time. It is through the images captured by friends like Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Nicolas Murray and Edward Weston that different stages of the relationship, life, pain and death of Frida and Diego are presented.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.

16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium: The Ancient Maya and Collapse

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The Middle American Research Institute, in collaboration with Tulane’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies, New Orleans Museum of Art, and Mexican Consulate in New Orleans, is proud to announce the 16th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium beginning on Thursday, February 14, and concluding on Sunday, February 17, 2019. This year’s conference The Center Could Not Hold: The Ancient Maya and Collapse will explore recent developments in Maya studies as they relate to the broader topic of collapse. Speakers and workshops will address the issue of political decline over the span of ancient Maya prehistory. These researchers will help us address the collapse in a multi-disciplinary fashion and bring attention to recent research in the region.

Registration is now open! Register by Monday, January 14 for the early registration rate.

On Friday, February 15, at 6:00 PM, the keynote address will be given by Jeremy A. Sabloff, External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute and Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus, of the University of Pennsylvania. In his talk Is “Collapse” a Useful Term in Understanding Pre-Columbian Maya History?, Dr. Sabloff considers how the term “collapse” has, in recent years, become quite controversial, and argues that there is good reason to question the utility of this loaded word going forward. This keynote talk will focus on understandings of the late 8th and early 9th centuries CE cultural processes and environmental events in the Maya Lowlands that culminated in what has often been seen as a political collapse. Moreover, the talk will examine whether such understanding can help illuminate comparable trends at other times in Maya history and in other complex societies in general.

Since 2002, the Middle American Research Institute of Tulane University has hosted a weekend of talks and workshops dedicated to the study of the Maya civilization of Mexico and Central America. This yearly meeting has called upon scholars from a wide spectrum of specialties including archaeology, art history, cultural anthropology, epigraphy, history, and linguistics to elucidate the many facets of this fascinating Mesoamerican culture. In developing a broad approach to the subject matter, the conference aims to draw the interest of a wide ranging group of participants from the expert to the beginner.

To view the schedule, registration, and additional information, please visit the Tulane Maya Symposium website.