Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

General Resources on Latin America

Dumbarton and Oaks Research Library and Collection
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection supports research and learning internationally in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. The institute disseminates knowledge through its own publications and online resources.

Google Arts and Culture: Latino Cultures in the US
Latino Cultures in the US is one of the largest digital collections of Latino art, culture, and history featuring more than 2,500 pieces of art through 90 exhibits. Users are able to take virtual tours of museums and historic sites, and access collections that showcase Latino art, influential figures, and defining moments in Latino history.

The Maya Hieroglyphic Codices
This site features a searchable translation and analysis of four codices (screenfold books) painted by Maya scribes before the Spanish conquest in the early 16th century. The codices contain information about Maya beliefs and rituals, as well as everyday activities, all framed within an astronomical and calendrical context.

National Endowment for the Humanities: Hispanic Heritage Month
Through EDSITEment and NEH-funded resources, students can explore the history of Hispanic culture in America by accessing ongoing projects, web series, curriculum units, and featured lessons and websites.

International Education Week
International Education Week (IEW), November 12-16, is an opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide.

The Latin American Library – Tulane University
The Latin American Library has an impressive collection of rare printed materials, manuscripts, Latin American government publications, one of the few Latin American image archives in the country, and over 2,000 rubbings of Maya relief sculpture. Among many other unique holdings, the collection includes over 4,500 maps and broadsides, a large number of historic newspapers, original drawings by William Spratling and other silver designers from Taxco, Mexico, and substantial collections of printed ephemera. Most holdings are in English, Spanish or Portuguese although many other languages are also represented.

The Latin American Library Primary Sources – Tulane University There are a plethora of resources on the web to find digitized printed books, manuscripts, newspapers, images, archival documents, music, film, and video with Latin American & Caribbean content. This website contains links to digitalized content organized by content, geographic area, and theme. For additional help, contact Rachel Stein, the LAL Research & Instruction Librarian.

Latin & Spanish New Orleans – Tulane University
The Latin & Spanish New Orleans is a collection of resources to help educators locate sources on present and past connections between the Crescent City and Latin America, the Caribbean, and Spain. For additional help, contact Rachel Stein, the LAL Research & Instruction Librarian.

Sources and General Resources on Latin America
Oberlin College’s website compiles many resources on Latin America into one place accessible for all teachers and students.

Smithsonian Latino Center
The Smithsonian Latino Center provides interactive and innovative opportunities to enhance life-long learning and increase access and awareness to the Smithsonian’s Latino collections and resources in the arts, sciences, and humanities. The SLC offers youth and professional development programs, K-12 school programs and workshops, family programming, online resources, and downloadable bilingual teacher and student materials. These programs and resources teach the public about the untold stories of Latinos in America.

S.S. NOLA: A Place for Teachers of Social Studies
S.S. NOLA’s mission is to support local teachers of social studies by providing links to pedagogically strong lesson plans, a lending library for classroom resources, and professional development opportunities to collaborate with other educators across the New Orleans area. S.S. NOLA provides lesson plans for K-5 and 6-12 grade levels.

The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database: Voyages
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database has information on almost 36,000 slaving voyages that forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans for transport to the Americas between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. The actual number is estimated to have been as high as 12.5 million. The database and the separate estimates interface offer researchers, students and the general public a chance to rediscover the reality of one of the largest forced movements of peoples in world history.

Resources for Teaching about the Americas/Latin American Database – University of New Mexico
The Latin America Data Base (LADB)is the longest running, premier, exclusively on-line, English language news service about Latin America. LADB produces three weekly electronic publications (Sourcemex, NotiCen and NotiSur) and maintains an on-line searchable data base of over 24,000 articles as well as Latin American journals.

Handbook of Latin American Studies
This database contains bibliographic records found in the Handbook of Latin American Studies (HLAS) from the 1970s to the present. HLAS includes annotated citations for books, journal articles, book chapters, conference papers, maps and atlases, and e-resources.

Art Resources

Latin American Visual Online Repository is American University’s image repository on Latin America. For educational use only.

ArtsEdge
The Kennedy Center’s free digital resource for teaching and learning in, through and about the arts. This link highlights lesson ideas on Latin America but includes many more ideas on the site.

New York Public Library digital collections is an excellent collection of documents, images, and more on a wide variety of topics.

Library of Congress digital collections contains images of historic events, historic documents, and more about a variety of topics.

Language Resources

Language Resource Centers
The website of all National Language Resource Centers. Provides links to a wide variety of resource centers with curricula and information about languages. Some teaching resources also available on the website.

National Heritage Language Resource Center
The National Heritage Language Resource Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, is a joint project of the UCLA Center for World Languages and the University of California Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching. Its mission is to develop effective pedagogical approaches for teaching heritage language learners, first by creating a research base, and then by pursuing curriculum design, materials development, and teacher education.

Zambombazo
Spanish teacher Zachary Jones has created a new website that features a wide range of activities based on authentic cultural products, including music, comic strips, humor, film, news, TV, and radio.

Science Resources

Bureau of Land Managment
The BLM presents a set of resources for teachers and students which involve environmental, paleontological, and archaeological scenarios. Includes lesson plans, opportunities for professional development with the BLM, and classroom resources.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
A bilingual (Spanish/English) set of resources about tropical ecology and the environment.

The Globe Program
The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program that promotes and supports students, teachers, and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based investigations of the environment. Partners in the project include NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation.

Rainforest Alliance
Includes virtual visits to Latin American rainforests; online simulated games; stories about the rainforest in Spanish, Portuguese and English; printable activities, and fact books about rainforest species.

Social Studies Resources

Asia Society
Great website for schools and teachers trying to develop global competence among students and internationalize the curriculum.

Maya Lords of Time Educators Guide
A guide to the Maya from the University of Pennsylvania.

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian, a branch of the Smithsonian Museum, has resources for the classroom based on items in their collection. Particularly useful resources include their curriculum and interactive games about the Maya and an interactive online display of items from the Museum Collection from around the world, Infinity of Nations.

New Populations, Louisiana Folklife
The New Populations branch of the Louisiana Folklife Program examines cultural communities and traditions within Louisiana. Their focus is on documenting traditions of peoples from other countries/cultures who reside in Louisiana. Resources concerning traditions of peoples from around the world, including Latin America are available on their website. Information concerning Latin America includes pages on Cuban music and festivals ; Garifuna culture ; Guatemalan food and music ; Honduran identity ; Latino/Hispanic food, traditions, music, and experiences ; Mexican celebrations ; Nicaraguan traditions ; and a variety of other topics.

Patolli
Patolli is a board game played by Maya and Aztec peoples in archaeological times. Various resources for downloading on line versions of Patolli games are available. These include an Iphone ap which also provides a description of the game with details on how to play. A fun way to introduce your students to important aspects of Aztec world views and religious beliefs!

Smithsonian Olmec Resources
A great resource for learning about the Olmec, an early Pre-Columbian people in the Gulf Area of Mexico, with excellent images.

TakingITGlobal
An interactive website engaging the online community with global issues. Play the interactive, online game, “Ayiti, The Cost of Life” developed to learn more about Haiti

Multiple Subject Areas

Archaeology Institute of America’s Interactive Dig
The Archaeology Institute of America has a variety of interactive on-line activities about archaeology and archaeological digs both in Latin America and around the world. An excellent resource for those wishing to integrate science, math, and social studies in teaching about Latin American content.

Archaeology Institute of America’s Lesson Plans
The AIA wants to help K‘€“12 educators bring the fascinating material culture and methodological approaches of archaeology into their classrooms as a springboard for teaching scientific methods, critical thinking and writing, and analytical skills across the curriculum.

Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs
CLASP features select curricula about Latin America from member institutions on this page. A good place to start looking for curricula on a variety of Latin American topics.

Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) connects people to the riches held within America‘€™s libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions. All of the materials found through DPLA‘€“photographs, books, maps, news footage, oral histories, personal letters, museum objects, artwork, government documents, and so much more‘€“are free and immediately available in digital format.

EDSITEment
The National Endowment for the Humanities houses a wealth of diverse resources featuring Latin America on this site.

Latin American Visual Repository
A resource of images from throughout Latin America for use by scholars and educators.

National Geographic Education
Mapping and other resources from all areas of the world and for all grade levels and subjects.

Smithsonian Anthropology Teaching Activities
The Anthropology wing of the Smithsonian has a variety of teaching resources, including lesson plans, on subject areas as diverse as archaeology, ethnography, evolution, and primates. They also have information on the Maya and Mali. An excellent and diverse group of resources.

Society for American Archaeology K-12 Activities & Resources
A list of activities designed to help students connect with how people in the past lived and understand how scientists study people who lived hundreds and even thousands of years ago.

Global Competency in Education

Global Competency in the K-12 Classroom. A resource introducing global competency and how to introduce it into the K-12 classroom.

Engaging the World A website devoted to providing information about global competency and resources for achieving it in the classroom.

If you would like to make a recommendation for a website to be added to the LARC featured sites listing, please send a link and a description to crcrts@tulane.edu.

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Upcoming Events

Bate papo! Speak Portuguese!

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Join us for an informal conversation hour with members of BRASA. All levels welcome. No registration necessary – come and stay for a few minutes or the whole hour! For more information, please contact Megwen at portuguese@tulane.edu.

FRIDAY – April 2, 2021
1:00 PM
Special edition Bate-papo with BRASA! Jones Hall patio.

FRIDAY – April 9, 2021
3:00 PM
Bate-papo. Jones Hall patio.

FRIDAY – April 16, 2021
1:30 PM
Special edition Bate-papo with Rice University. https://tulane.zoom.us/j/7338920192

This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome.

On/Off-Screen: The Other Histories of Cinema in Latin America

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On/Off Screen. The Other Histories of Cinema in Latin America / Las otras historias del cine en América Latina explores practices of film distribution, exhibition and cinemagoing in Latin America. Over the past decade, the receiving end of the film chain, including patterns of film distribution and exhibition and the experiences of cinemagoers, has received increasing scholarly attention. Although this turn has made inroads beyond Eurocentric, Anglo-American limits, there is still a need to highlight other important cinematographic regions, especially Latin America. The symposium brings together scholars working in/on this domain from Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Cuba, and the US, etc to engage in conversations about film culture across the Western hemisphere.

More information can be found on the website, here.

Teaching and Understanding Women's Activism in the Face of Violence

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(Description via Vanderbilt CLAS)

Join Vanderbilt CLAS and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University for a teacher workshop about incorporating topics of social justice and gender equality in the curriculum. In 2019, Amalia Rubin and Parker Benedict joined forces to create She Stands Up, a project that aims to spark meaningful conversations in high school classrooms about the power of women’s activism in the face of violence. While the project’s lesson plans focus on social mobilization in Latin America, where reporting of violence against women has been steadily increasing in recent years, She Stands Up creators hope to inspire teachers and students alike to tackle relevant and difficult topics in the classroom. In this special workshop, Amalia and Parker will take us through the research behind the project, introduce us to their website (full of resources!), and lead us in an activity from one of their lesson plans. Current and aspiring high school educators are encouraged to attend, and all educators are welcome.

Data across the Disciplines: Notes from Field Research in Latin America

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This discussion will focus on how Latin Amercanist scholars use data in their research. Marcello Canuto (Tulane University) will present on the use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and other geospatial methods in his work in Maya archaeology. In a discussion moderated by Claudia Brittenham (University of Chicago), we will then discuss benefits and challenges, helpful tools, and various approaches to implementing new technologies into field research. This event workshop is for students in any field who are thinking about the possible uses of spatial imaging and other types of technology-collected data in their own research.

Marcello A. Canuto is Director of the Middle American Research Institute and Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University. He has undertaken archaeological excavations in the Maya region, South America, India, north Africa, and the northeast US. His primary research interest in the Maya area has been on the integrative mechanisms that the ancient Maya used to build and maintain a socio-politically complex society throughout both the Preclassic and Classic periods. He now co-directs a project in the understudied Northwest Peten, Guatemala where he investigates the construction of social categories and the mechanisms by which complex socio-political organizations develop and were maintained.

Claudia Brittenham is Interim Director of the Center for Latin American Studies and Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on the art of ancient Mesoamerica, with particular attention to the ways that the materiality of art and the politics of style contribute to our understanding of the ontology of images. Her current book project, Unseen Art: Vision and Memory in Ancient Mesoamerica, explores problems of visibility and the status of images in Mesoamerica. Ranging from carvings on the undersides of Aztec sculptures to Maya lintels, and buried Olmec offerings, it examines the distance between ancient experiences of works of art and the modern practice of museum display.

Register in advance for this meeting with this link

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Sponsored by the Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Chicago, under the auspices of the Tinker Field Research Collaborative.

Download the pdf of the flyer here.

A Discussion of Obscuro Barroco: "Imaginaçoes de Carnaval"

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Join Drs. Ana López, João Luiz Vieira, Leslie Louise Marsh, and Catherine Benamou for a discussion of the documentary film Obscuro Barroco.

Obscuro Barroco is a documentary-fiction film about the dizzying heights of gender and metamorphosis in Rio de Janeiro. Following the path of iconic transgender figure Luana Muniz (1961-2017), the film explores the different quests for the self, through transvestism, carnival and political struggle. In turn, it asks questions about the desire for transformation of the body, both intimate and social.

The full film is available to watch here.

You can also watch the film, browse resources, and meet the panelists on the event webpage, here.
We encourage all attendees to watch the film prior to the event.

Special thanks to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the PORTulane community, the Department of Communication, and the Howard Tilton Memorial Library for co-sponsoring this project.

Kaqchikel/K'iche' Language Table: K'iche' Language Learning

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Join fellow students, teachers, and native speakers to practice your Kaqchikel language skills and deepen your understanding of Kaqchikel culture. This event is held on the last Thursday of each month for the duration of the Spring 2021 semester.

The April 29th session will focus on K’iche’ language learning with guest speaker Nela Petronila Tahay Tzay. It will be facilitated by Ignacio Carvajal.