Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

General Resources on Latin America

The Maya Hieroglyphic Codices – This site features a searchable translation and analysis of four codices (screenfold books) painted by Maya scribes before the Spanish conquest in the early 16th century. The codices contain information about Maya beliefs and rituals, as well as everyday activities, all framed within an astronomical and calendrical context.

Google Arts and Culture: Latino Cultures in the US
Latino Cultures in the US is one of the largest digital collections of Latino art, culture, and history featuring more than 2,500 pieces of art through 90 exhibits. Users are able to take virtual tours of museums and historic sites, and access collections that showcase Latino art, influential figures, and defining moments in Latino history.

Resources for Teaching about the Americas/Latin American Database – University of New Mexico
The Latin America Data Base (LADB)is the longest running, premier, exclusively on-line, English language news service about Latin America. LADB produces three weekly electronic publications (Sourcemex, NotiCen and NotiSur) and maintains an on-line searchable data base of over 24,000 articles as well as Latin American journals.

The Latin American Library – Tulane University
The Latin American Library has an impressive collection of rare printed materials, manuscripts, Latin American government publications, one of the few Latin American image archives in the country, and over 2,000 rubbings of Maya relief sculpture. Among many other unique holdings, the collection includes over 4,500 maps and broadsides, a large number of historic newspapers, original drawings by William Spratling and other silver designers from Taxco, Mexico, and substantial collections of printed ephemera. Most holdings are in English, Spanish or Portuguese although many other languages are also represented.

Sources and General Resources on Latin America
Oberlin College’s website compiles many resources on Latin America into one place accessible for all teachers and students.

Smithsonian Education: Teaching Hispanic Heritage
Smithsonian Education provides lessons and classroom activities on a variety of topics on Latin American heritage and culture for grades K-12.

Smithsonian Latino Center
The Smithsonian Latino Center provides interactive and innovative opportunities to enhance life-long learning and increase access and awareness to the Smithsonian’s Latino collections and resources in the arts, sciences, and humanities. The SLC offers youth and professional development programs, K-12 school programs and workshops, family programming, online resources, and downloadable bilingual teacher and student materials. These programs and resources teach the public about the untold stories of Latinos in America.

National Endowment for the Humanities: Hispanic Heritage Month
Through EDSITEment and NEH-funded resources, students can explore the history of Hispanic culture in America by accessing ongoing projects, web series, curriculum units, and featured lessons and websites.

Art Resources

Latin American Visual Online Repository is American University’s image repository on Latin America. For educational use only.

The Kennedy Center’s free digital resource for teaching and learning in, through and about the arts. This link highlights lesson ideas on Latin America but includes many more ideas on the site.

New York Public Library digital collections is an excellent collection of documents, images, and more on a wide variety of topics.

Library of Congress digital collections contains images of historic events, historic documents, and more about a variety of topics.

Language Resources

Language Resource Centers
The website of all National Language Resource Centers. Provides links to a wide variety of resource centers with curricula and information about languages. Some teaching resources also available on the website.

National Heritage Language Resource Center
The National Heritage Language Resource Center at the University of California, Los Angeles, is a joint project of the UCLA Center for World Languages and the University of California Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching. Its mission is to develop effective pedagogical approaches for teaching heritage language learners, first by creating a research base, and then by pursuing curriculum design, materials development, and teacher education.

Spanish teacher Zachary Jones has created a new website that features a wide range of activities based on authentic cultural products, including music, comic strips, humor, film, news, TV, and radio.

Science Resources

Bureau of Land Managment
The BLM presents a set of resources for teachers and students which involve environmental, paleontological, and archaeological scenarios. Includes lesson plans, opportunities for professional development with the BLM, and classroom resources.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
A bilingual (Spanish/English) set of resources about tropical ecology and the environment.

The Globe Program
The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based science and education program that promotes and supports students, teachers, and scientists to collaborate on inquiry-based investigations of the environment. Partners in the project include NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Science Foundation.

Rainforest Alliance
Includes virtual visits to Latin American rainforests; online simulated games; stories about the rainforest in Spanish, Portuguese and English; printable activities, and fact books about rainforest species.

Social Studies Resources

Asia Society
Great website for schools and teachers trying to develop global competence among students and internationalize the curriculum.

Maya Lords of Time Educators Guide
A guide to the Maya from the University of Pennsylvania.

National Museum of the American Indian
The National Museum of the American Indian, a branch of the Smithsonian Museum, has resources for the classroom based on items in their collection. Particularly useful resources include their curriculum and interactive games about the Maya and an interactive online display of items from the Museum Collection from around the world, Infinity of Nations.

New Populations, Louisiana Folklife
The New Populations branch of the Louisiana Folklife Program examines cultural communities and traditions within Louisiana. Their focus is on documenting traditions of peoples from other countries/cultures who reside in Louisiana. Resources concerning traditions of peoples from around the world, including Latin America are available on their website. Information concerning Latin America includes pages on Cuban music and festivals ; Garifuna culture ; Guatemalan food and music ; Honduran identity ; Latino/Hispanic food, traditions, music, and experiences ; Mexican celebrations ; Nicaraguan traditions ; and a variety of other topics.

Patolli is a board game played by Maya and Aztec peoples in archaeological times. Various resources for downloading on line versions of Patolli games are available. These include an Iphone ap which also provides a description of the game with details on how to play. A fun way to introduce your students to important aspects of Aztec world views and religious beliefs!

Smithsonian Olmec Resources
A great resource for learning about the Olmec, an early Pre-Columbian people in the Gulf Area of Mexico, with excellent images.

An interactive website engaging the online community with global issues. Play the interactive, online game, “Ayiti, The Cost of Life” developed to learn more about Haiti

Multiple Subject Areas

Archaeology Institute of America’s Interactive Dig
The Archaeology Institute of America has a variety of interactive on-line activities about archaeology and archaeological digs both in Latin America and around the world. An excellent resource for those wishing to integrate science, math, and social studies in teaching about Latin American content.

Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs
CLASP features select curricula about Latin America from member institutions on this page. A good place to start looking for curricula on a variety of Latin American topics.

Digital Public Library of America
The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) connects people to the riches held within America’s libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions. All of the materials found through DPLA—photographs, books, maps, news footage, oral histories, personal letters, museum objects, artwork, government documents, and so much more—are free and immediately available in digital format.

The National Endowment for the Humanities houses a wealth of diverse resources featuring Latin America on this site.

Latin American Visual Repository
A resource of images from throughout Latin America for use by scholars and educators.

National Geographic Education
Mapping and other resources from all areas of the world and for all grade levels and subjects.

Smithsonian Anthropology Teaching Activities
The Anthropology wing of the Smithsonian has a variety of teaching resources, including lesson plans, on subject areas as diverse as archaeology, ethnography, evolution, and primates. They also have information on the Maya and Mali. An excellent and diverse group of resources.

Global Competency in Education

Global Competency in the K-12 Classroom. A resource introducing global competency and how to introduce it into the K-12 classroom.

Engaging the World A website devoted to providing information about global competency and resources for achieving it in the classroom.

If you would like to make a recommendation for a website to be added to the LARC featured sites listing, please send a link and a description to




All Events

Upcoming Events

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: kibe

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Bate Papo! Try a bit of Brazil’s Middle Eastern flavor with these kibe treats. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Loyola University to host talk by Ward Churchill on Indigenism in North America

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Loyola University is excited to welcome acclaimed activist-intellectual Ward Churchill, author of the new book Wielding Words like Weapons: Selected Essays in Indigenism, 1995–2005 and 30 Year Anniversary edition of Pacifism as Pathology: Reflections on the Role of Armed Struggle in North America.

Ward will give an explanation of indigenism, moving from there to the concepts of the Fourth World and the three-legged stool of classic, internal, and settler-state colonialism. He will discuss historical and ongoing genocide of North America’s native peoples and the systematic distortion of the political and legal history of U.S.-Indian relations.

A prolific American Indian scholar/activist, Ward Churchill is a founding member of the Rainbow Council of Elders, and longtime member of the leadership council of the American Indian Movement of Colorado. In addition to his numerous works on indigenous history, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign policy and the repression of political dissent, including the FBI’s COINTELPRO operations against the Black Panther Party and the American Indian Movement. Five of his more than 20 books have received human rights awards.

Please contact Nathan Henne ( for additional information.

Sponsored by
The Loyola Latin American Studies Program
The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at Loyola
The Department of Language and Cultures
The Department of English

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Drop by the LBC mezzanine floor for a slice of manioc sponge cake. We will be spread out across the green couches so come by to take a load off and chat for a bit. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: Romeo & Julieta

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Bate Papo! Join us once again in the LBC mezzanine area to sample the most romantic treat in all of Brazil: Romeo & Julieta. Never heard of it? Come give it a try! It is like nothing you’ve ever tasted before… This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at

Office of Multicultural Affairs: International Food and Music Festival

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The International Food and Music Festival is a tradition for Tulane University and the surrounding New Orleans community. It is not possible without the participation of the international community at Tulane. We need your help to represent your culture, country, or community. Share food, crafts, cultural history, language, performance, and have fun at this beautiful outdoor festival.

This event is FREE for all Tulane faculty, staff and students. You must present your Splash Card. Non-affiliated Tulane attendees can purchase tickets here.

Interested in being a sponsor? Click here for more information and registration.

If you have questions, email or

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pave

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Bate Papo! End your Friday afternoon on the Jones Hall patio with a classic Brazilian layer dessert. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at