Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Tulane University – New Orleans, LA
April 2009

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University held the Second Biennial Latin American Environmental Media Festival in New Orleans April 2009. This weekend-long festival brought to audiences films, videos, and innovative works in digital media whose subjects call critical attention to major environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean. The festival was held on the Tulane University campus and at venues in the city. It screened a curated, non-competitive series of innovative works and new productions submitted as part of a juried competition. A distinguished jury awarded prizes in four categories at the opening of the festival in late March.

2009 Film Winners

  • Best Feature Length Documentary – Grissi Siknis: La enfermedad mágica de la selva/ Grissi Siknis: The magic illness of the jungle
    Enrique Ruiz-Skipey
    Mexico/Nicaragua/Spain, 2008

The jungle madness known as Grissi Siknis is a contagious, naturally bound syndrome that occurs among the Miskito of Eastern Central America and affects mainly young women. Grissi Siknis is typically characterized by long periods of anxiety, nausea, dizziness, irrational anger and fear interlaced with short periods of rapid frenzy in which the victims lose consciousness, and believe that devils beat them, have sexual relations with them, and run away. Traditional Miskito tradition holds that Grissi Siknis is caused by possession by evil spirits or inflicted by a malevolent evil sorcerer. While Western medicine typically has no effect on those affected with the disease, the remedies of Miskito herbalists or healers are often successful in curing the madness.

  • Best of the Fest – Justicia Now!
    Martin O’Brien and Robbie Proctor
    Ecuador, 2007
    Justicia Now! is a documentary about Chevron Texaco’s toxic legacy in the Northern Ecuadorian region of the Amazon rainforest – and a courageous group of people called Los Afectados (The Affected Ones) who are seeking justice for the ensuing cancer, sickness and death in the largest environmental class action lawsuit in history. Get more information here.

For more information, please contact Denise Wolterning at dwolteri@tulane.edu or 504-862-3143.

This event is sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.

Spring 2004

LARC did not offer any film series for that semester, but instead offered several workshops.

Fall 2003

Environmental Justice and Human Rights in Latin America September 20, 2003, 9:00AM – 12:00PM

* This film series presented documentaries from the Lending Library that focused on issues of environmental justice and as they relate to human rights. It also looked at ways that globalization has effected the environment in Latin America and what repercussions it has had on indigenous groups.

Dia de los Muertos Saturday, October 11, 2003, 9:00AM – 12:00PM

* This professional development opportunity presented slides and films that showed Dia de los Muertos events throughout Mexico and feature materials available through the Lending Library. Participants of this workshop also were treated to an art lesson that taught teachers how to build Dia de los Muertos artifacts in their classroom.

Latin American Studies Film Series October 16, 7:00 PM and November 20, 7:00 PM
LARC sponsored two films as part of the Latin American Studies Film Series.

* Hidden in Plain Sight Directed by John Smihula. (U.S., 2002) Afetr the showing, there was a Q & A with the director himself. * The Harder They Come. (Jamaica, 1973)

Spring 2003

State Sponsored Violence and Civil Unrest in Latin American History-
The Shining Path Guerrilla Movement of Peru
Saturday, March 22, 2003, 9am-12pm
Latin America is recognized for its geographic diversity and cultural vibrancy. The region is also characterized by its repressive political regimes, human rights abuses, bloody civil wars, and violent revolutions. How can teachers address such histories without perpetuating stereotypes and simplifying the issues? How should educators approach these violent histories in the classroom? This series will screen the Peruvian film, La Boca del Lobo, and utilize Peru’s Shining Path as a case study for discussing these sorts of issues. Tulane PhD candidate Cynthia Garza will give a pre-screening introduction on the Shining Path and facilitate a discussion after the film. Curriculum materials will be provided.

Films:
La Boca del Lobo
Zapatistas: The Next Phase
Remarkable Images

Art, Identity, and the Mexican Revolution
Saturday, April 19, 2003, 9am-12pm
Art and the Mexican Revolution are an inseparable pair whose combination changed the face of the country. This workshop will present materials on the Revolution and the art that developed as a result. By studying artists like Diego Rivera, José David Alfaro Siqueiros, José Guadalupe Posada, and others, students will gain an understanding of how the art of a nation embodies the spirit of its people and can often create a momentum that changes the entire political structure. Films and slides from the Lending Library will be previewed. Dr. Robert Irwin will lead an opening discussion on art and identity. Curriculum materials will also be available.

Films:
Mexican Murals: A Revolution on the Walls
Diego Rivera: Art and Revolution
Jose Guadeloupe Posada
Siquieros

LARC Film Series Presents Film Maker Greg Berger
Friday, April 4, 2003, 7pm
Freeman Auditorium, Tulane University
This film presentation is free and open to the public.
Greg Berger will present his two latest films Atenco: Machete Rebellion and ¡Tierra sí, aviones No! Berger and fellow crew members are on a national speaking tour to raise awareness of the plight of Atenco’s farmers, who stand to lose 95% of their farmland if a new airport is built. Claiming to be the first non-violent struggle of the 21st century, the Machete Rebellion has so far stopped the governments plans to expropriate the land from the farmers of Atenco.

Fall 2002

LARC did not offer a film series this semester. However, we did make available the LAS Film Series Schedule to all educators interested in learning about new films in the LARC Lending Library.

Spring 2002

Mesoamerican Folkstory and Myth Tuesday, March 5, 4:00pm-7:30pm and Saturday, March 9, 9:00am-12:30pm

* The Popol Vuh: The Creation Myth of the Maya. Directed by University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1986). 60 min. * The Five Suns: A Sacred History of Mexico. Directed by University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1986). 60 min. * Chac: The Rain God. Directed by Rolando Klein (1970/2001). 95 min.

Life on the Street Tuesday, April 9, 4:00pm-7:00pm and
Saturday, April 13, 9:00am-12:00pm

* Los ninos abandonados: Colombia. Directed by Danny Lyons (1975). 63 min. * Wilbert: Street Kid in Nicaragua. Directed and Produced by Bent Erik Kroyer (1995). 16 min. * Slave Ship: Favelas of Rio de Janeiro. Produced by Latin American Video Archives (1994). 28 min. * Venezuela: Children of the Street. Produced by Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1990). 26 min. * Guest speakers on current conditions in Brazilian favelas and in the streets of Nicaragua

Caribbean Roots: Indigenous Survivors Tuesday, May 7, 4:00pm-7:00pm and Saturday, May 11, 9:00am-12:00pm

* Portrait of the Caribbean Part E: Worlds Apart. Produced by Ambrose Video (1992). 60 min. * Garifuna Journey. Leland Berger Productions (1999). 47 min. * Caribbean Eye: Indigenous Survivors. Banyan Limited (1992). 30 min. * Quest of the Carib Canoe. Think Tank/BBC Television. (2000). 50 min.

Summer 2001

This series explored the reality of religion, music, art and war. It began to understand the complexity of women and children, the African and the indigenous. Please contact us with feedback on these and other films.

Schedule

Caribbean Music and Dance Monday, June 18, 1:00-4:00pm

* Routes of Rhythm: From Spain and Africa. The Cinema Guild (1997). * Every Day Art. LAVA (1994). * Chutney in Yuh Soca. Filmmakers Library (1995). * Rhythms of Haiti. Organization of American States (ca. 1980). * More resources on Caribbean Music and Dance

Women in Latin America Thursday, June 21, 1:00-4:00pm

* Las Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Produced by Susana Munoz & Lourdes Portillo (ca. 1985). * Home is Struggle. Women Make Movies (1991). * Women of Latin America: Cuba and Guatemala. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * In Women’s Hands: The Changing Roles of Women. Annenburg CPB Collection (1993). * More resources on Women in Latin America

The Reality of War Monday, June 25, 1:00-4:00pm

* Father Roy: Inside the School of Assassins. Richter Productions (1997). * If the Mango Tree Could Speak: Children and War in Latin America. New Day Films (1993). * Lines of Blood. Directed by Brian Moser and Julia Ware (1991). * Women of Latin America: Guatemala. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * More resources on War in Latin America

Tradition and Revolution Through Art Thursday, June 28, 1:00-4:00pm

* Popol Vuh: The Creation Myth of the Maya. University of California Extension (1986). * Mexican Murals: A Revolution on the Walls. Ohio University (1977). * The Art of Haiti. Facets Video (1983). * Daughters of Ixchel: Maya Thread of Change. University of California Extension (1993). * More resources on Art in Latin America

Children Without a Childhood Monday, July 9, 1:00-4:00pm

* Zoned for Slavery: The Child Behind the Label. Crowing Rooster Arts (1996). * Mexico: Back Door to the Promised Land. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (2000). * Sweating for a T-Shirt. Global Exchange (2000). * More resources on Children in Latin America

The African Diaspora Thursday, July 12, 1:00-4:00pm

* Axe. LAVA (1988). * Garifuna Journey. Leland Berger Productions (1999). * Palenque Un Canto. Casimba Films (1992). * Black Atlantic: On the Orixas Route. Filmmakers Library (1999). * More resources on Afro-Latin America

Indigenous Latin America Monday, July 16, 1:00-4:00pm

* Amazon Journal. Directed by Geoffrey O’Connor (1996). * Women of Latin America: Ecuador. Directed by Carmen Sarmiento Garcia (1995). * Rigoberta Menchu: Broken Silence. Films for the Humanities (1993). * More resources on Indigenous Latin America

The Diversity of Faith Thursday, July 19, 1:00-4:00pm

* Televangelism in Brazil. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1999). * Havana Nagila: The Jews in Cuba. Schnitzki & Stone Video (1995). * In Search of History: Voodoo Secrets. A&E Television Networks (1996). * More resources on Religion in Latin America

Fall 2001

This series presented voices from children, leaders of social movements, victims of torture, and players in Latin America’s increasingly globalized and always political economy. Please contact us with feedback on these and other films.

Schedule

Children Speak Saturday, September 29, 9:00am-12:00pm and Tuesday, October 2, 4:00-7:00pm

* Medellin Notebooks. Directed by Catalina Villar (1998). * Children Without a Childhood: Mexico, Back Door to the Promised Land. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (2000). * If the Mango Tree Could Speak: A Documentary About Children and War in Central America. Directed by Patricia Goudvis (1993). * More resources on Children in Latin America.

Torture, Rights and Revolution Tuesday, October 23, 4:00-7:00pm and Saturday, October 27, 9:00am-12:00pm **Please be advised, these films portray real life violence that may not be suitable for all audiences.

* Brazil: Report on Torture. Directed by Saul Landau and Haskell Wexler (1971). * Human Rights in Haiti. Produced by Isabelle Abric for United Nations/OAS (2000). * Speaking Out: Displaced Colombians Silent No More. U.S. Committee for Refugees (2000). * Remarkable Images: The Ecuadorean Indigenous-Military Uprising. Directed by Brian Selmeski (2000). * More resources on Violence and Social Movements in Latin America.

Changing Markets, International Connections Saturday, November 10, 9:00am-12:00pm and Tuesday, November 13, 4:00-7:00pm

* Rainforests: Proving Their Worth. Produced by Interlock Media Associates (1990). * La Esquina Caliente: The Hot Corner: US-Cuba Baseball. Directed by William O’Neill and Michael Skolnik (2000). * Daughters of Ixchel: Maya Thread of Change. University of California Extension Center for Media and Independent Learning (1993). * Street Vendors: The Informal Majority. Films for the Humanities and Sciences (1996). * More resources on Markets in Latin America.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

NEWS

EVENTS

All Events

Upcoming Events

Apply for the Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

View Full Event Description

Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A Summer Educator Institute in Cuba
Havana, Cuba | June 23 – July 7, 2018
Program Application
Application Deadline: March 2, 2018

Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University join forces with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies to take K-16 educators to Cuba. This is our fourth year running the Cuban Culture & Society K-16 Educator Institute and we are excited about this year’s itinerary. The institute will approach Cuban society and culture form a multidisciplinary perspective focused on the arts, the geography, and history of the country. Innovative programming and annual summer teacher institutes over the past three years provide the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and studying the region. Taking advantage of Tulane’s relationship with the University of Havana and Cuba’s National Union of Writers and Artists, the institute equips teachers with multidisciplinary content, curricular resources, and methods of inquiry for developing that approach in their K-16 classrooms. Conducted in English by Professor Carolina Caballero, the institute will explore current trends and issues in Cuban culture and society through readings, films, and lectures. The program includes a series of talks by prominent Cuban intellectuals and local field trips to important political and cultural sights throughout Havana.

This two-week program provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and country that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don’t miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

The trip will include a pre-departure orientation and two weeks in Cuba. The institute incorporates visits to local museums and exposes participants to arts organizations, schools, and teachers from the country’s national literacy campaign. Participants will stay within walking distance of the Malecón, the university, and many cultural venues. There will be group excursions to the historic Che Guevara monument, a visit to the site of the Bay of Pigs invasion, and a special visit to the town of Hershey, the town developed by Milton Hershey to begin his chocolate enterprise with the sugar from Cuba’s plantations. There will also be group excursions to the historic cities of Trinidad and Cienfuegos, Playa Girón, and Viñales, focusing on their role in the development of the economy and culture of the country

PROGRAM COST: $3,500
The cost will include a shared room and two meals a day, medical insurance, airfare to/from Havana from Tampa, Florida*, airport transportation in Havana to/from residence, OFAC-licensed academic visa, and specialized tours and outings.

*Airfare to/from Tampa, Florida, a one-night hotel stay in Tampa, incidental costs, and extra meals and expenses are not included in the program cost. You are responsible for your own air flight to/from Tampa, FL.

PROGRAM APPLICATION
Those interested in applying must be a K-16 educator or librarian. There is no Spanish language requirement for this program. The application deadline is March 2, 2018, at 5:00 PM.

Please note: This program is only open to K-16 educators who are currently teaching, are pre-service teachers or are serving in a school or public library.

PROPOSED ITINERARY – 15 DAYS
Please be advised that this itinerary is subject to change based on availability in Cuba. The itinerary below is the schedule from the 2017 institute.

  • Day 1 – U.S./HAVANA, CUBA
    Depart from Tampa, FL, Upon arrival, enjoy dinner and a welcome reception followed by an informal walk and people watching on the Malecón.
  • Day 2 – HAVANA
    Habana Vieja (Old Havana) Tour with local preservation experts to discuss in depth the history of local landmarks, historical preservation efforts, and future plans. Visit Muraleando Lawton, a community art project in the Lawton neighborhood of Havana. Hear from the founders of this project on how the neighborhood developed to promote skills in the community and support the local economy and meet with local community leaders, students and elderly folks at the community center.
  • Day 3 – HAVANA
    Lecture with Professor Carlos Alzugaray on Cuba Since the Special Period. Visit the elementary school Sergio Luis Ferriol in Habana Vieja. Connect with teachers and administrators about their experiences in the classroom.
  • Day 4 – HAVANA
    Visit the Museo Nacional de la Alfabetización (National Museum of the Literacy Campaign) and connect with members of the literacy brigade, teachers from the literacy campaign.
  • Day 5 – HAVANA
    Visit and explore Ernest Hemingway’s house. Have lunch in the infamous fishing village of Cojimar. In the afternoon, explore art by taking a tour of the Cuban Collection of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes accompanied by a curator then visit with artists at the Taller de Gráfica.
  • Day 6 – HERSHEY
    Day trip to the Hershey, Cuba and nature park. The site where famous chocolatier Milton Hershey developed his chocolate business by setting up sugar mills in the early 1900’s. Explore the natural side of Cuba in this country town.
  • Day 7 – HAVANA
    Learn about children’s literature and the book publishing business in Cuba by visiting Cuba’s national publisher UNEAC and hear first hand from children’s book authors. We will hear from children’s book author Olga Marta Pérez about the children’s/ youth Literacy Scene in Cuba today.
  • Day 8 – HAVANA/REGLA
    Take the ferry across the bay in Havana to the town of Regla to learn about Afro-Cuban dance and music from musicologist Cari Diez and an Afro-Cuban dance performance group.
  • Day 9 – SANTA CLARA, TRINIDAD
    Travel to Trinidad via Santa Clara, a town founded by 175 people on July 15, 1689. It is the site of the last battle in the Cuban Revolution in 1958. Visit to the Che Mausoleum in Santa Clara. Also visit the historic sugar plantation of Manaca Iznaga before arriving in Trinidad.
  • Day 10 – TRINIDAD
    Explore this UNESCO World Heritage site, founded on December 23, 1514 by Diego Velázquez de Cuellar. Trinidad was a central piece of Cuba’s sugar-based economy. Guided city tour with the city historian. Visit the Trinidad library to learn about the importance of libraries and debate questions of intellectual freedom with the staff.
  • Day 11 – PLAYA GIRON (SITE OF BAY OF PIGS) Ciénega de Zapata, Playa Larga
    Day excursion to the historic site of the Bay of Pigs, one of the landing sites for the 1961 US-backed invasion. Visit the Finca Fiesta Campesina farm, the Playa Girón museum, the Parque Ciénaga de Zapata, the Laguna del Tesoro, and the Taino Indian village. Snorkel in the Bay of Pigs!
  • Day 12 – HAVANA
    Visit the U.S. Embassy and hear first-hand about the state of current relations between the U.S. and Cuba. In the afternoon, we head over to meet up with the famous hip-hop group, Obsesión to hear about their music and experience as hip-hop artists in Cuba.
  • Day 13 – MATANZAS/VARADERO
    Take a day trip to Matanzas, the capital of the Cuban province of Matanzas. Known for its poets, culture, and Afro-Cuban folklore, we will explore the Triunvirato Plantation and the Castillo San Severino where we will hear about the history of slavery in Cuba. The rest of the afternoon we relax and explore the beautiful beaches of Varadero, a popular resort town covering Cuba’s narrow Hicacos Peninsula.
  • Day 14 – HAVANA
    Wrap-up curriculum workshop followed by a free afternoon ending in a celebratory dinner.
  • Day 15 – HAVANA/U.S.
    Morning departure for the U.S.

Explore our past trips through these photos and curricula:

Program Application

For more information, please contact Denise Woltering-Vargas at dwolteri@tulane.edu or call the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at 504-862-3143.

Apply for the Summer 2018 Teaching Brazil Teacher Institute

View Full Event Description

Teaching Brazil: Expanding Perspectives on Colonial History
K-12 Educator Summer Institute

Salvador, Rio de Janeiro & Sao Paulo, Brazil | July 7 – July 17, 2018

DEADLINE TO APPLY AS A CURRICULUM WRITER EXTENDED: MARCH 9, 2018

The centers for Latin American Studies at Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, with support from the University of Georgia will take K-16 educators in various disciplines to Brazil. The institute will approach Brazilian culture from a multidisciplinary perspective focused on colonialization. The trip will include a pre-departure orientation and two weeks of overseas travel. The institute will explore the cities of Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo to focus on their respective role in colonial history.

Innovative programming and annual summer teacher institutes over the past five years by the three institutes provide the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and studying the region. Taking advantage of each institution’s strength, the institute equips teachers with multidisciplinary content, curricular resources, and methods of inquiry for deploying that approach themselves in their K-12 classrooms, creating a model that is generative of innovative approaches to K-12 education more broadly.

Objectives:

  • Advance and disseminate knowledge of Brazil by providing opportunities fro K-12 educators to experience first-hand the history, politics, language, and culture of Brazil;
  • Provide introductory Portuguese language training that emphasizes regional linguistic variations;
  • Contribute to the development of internationalizing curriculum that accurately and effectively brings Brazil into the classroom through standards-based approaches.

REGISTRATION

Thanks to a U.S. Department of Education National Resource Center grant, this program is able to provide a special opportunity for educators to participate as Curriculum Writers at a reduced program cost. There are limited spots to participate as a curriculum writer so please get your applications submitted early! Please note that curriculum writers are responsible for submitting a curriculum by August 1, 2018. See the Curriculum Writer Guidelines for more information and check below on how to apply.

Curriculum Writer program cost: $1373 + internal airfare estimated at $300
Deadline to Register as a Curriculum Writer EXTENDED: MARCH 9, 2018

Regular Program Cost: $2,744 + internal airfare (approximately $300)
Deadline to Register: MARCH 15, 2018

PROGRAM COST INCLUDES:

  • 10 nights lodging;
  • 2 meals a day;
  • gratuities;
  • in-country transportation;
  • internet;
  • liability insurance;
  • medical evacuation insurance

NOT INCLUDED:

  • International round-trip airfare TO Brazil (we meet in Salvador and leave from Sao Paulo)
  • Hotel extras;
  • Meals not included in itinerary
  • Optional activities covered by individuals;
  • Individual travel insurance;
  • Visa fees

Cards will be charged 50% on March 19, 2018 and the remainder April 19, 2018.

In order to register, please:

1) Complete the registration form
2) Apply to be a Curriculum Writer (see instructions below).

Deadlines:

  • February 26, 2018: Deadline to apply for Curriculum Writer Scholarship
  • February 28, 2018: Winners of Curriculum Writer Scholarships will be notified
  • March 5, 2018: Deadline to accept conditions of Curriculum Writer Scholarship and return letter of commitment to Denise Woltering Vargas [dwolteri@tulane.edu] and Colleen McCoy [colleen.e.mccoy@vanderbilt.edu]
  • March 15, 2018: Final Deadline to Register for Brazil Institute 2018

INSTRUCTIONS TO APPLY FOR THE CURRICULUM WRITER SCHOLARSHIP
Thanks to a U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, and The University of Georgia are able to provide funding for K-16 teachers interested in developing a curriculum as part of their participation in this 2018 summer teacher institute to Brazil. Curriculum writers will be charged a discounted in-country program fee of $1373 + internal airfare (apx. $300) and international airfare. You must commit to writing a curriculum project – check out the Curriculum Writer Guidelines here. There are limited spots for this opportunity, please apply early. If you would like to apply to be a curriculum writer for this summer’s teacher institute in Brazil, please:

1) fill out the contact form HERE
2) submit the CURRICULUM WRITER APPLICATION by FEBRUARY 26, 2018 to crcrts@tulane.edu or mail to Denise Woltering Vargas at Tulane University, 100 Jones Hall, 6801 Freret Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118.
Please call 504-862-3143 with any questions.

La Hora del Cuento: Summer Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

View Full Event Description

This summer, join us for La hora del cuenta bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday April 28 until Saturday, August 25. Children and parents welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, May 5
2:30 PM

Saturday, June 2
2:30 PM

Saturday, July 7
2:30 PM

Saturday, August 4
2:30 PM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, April 28
12:00 PM

Saturday, May 26
12:00 PM

Saturday, June 30
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 28
12:00 PM

Saturday, August 25
12:00 PM