Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Spring 2003

Culture Clash: Indigenous Groups meet the Modern World
Thursday, March 20, 2003
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Today indigenous cultures make up the majority of the populations in a number of Latin American countries, with many of these groups still occupying their original lands. With modern society rapidly approaching these native “territories”, indigenous populations throughout Latin America and the world, are being forced into submission by powerful governments and even more powerful multi-national corporations. Through struggles over land, water, and minerals, indigenous groups are now being pushed out of their ancestral lands by governments and corporations seeking to monopolize their often rich natural resources.

In this workshop we will discuss definitions of culture, how it is being preserved, and why it is important; define the term indigenous; give numerous examples of indigenous populations; focus on ways to use indigenous groups as case studies in order to address a variety of content standards. We will also look at teaching materials available to educators who wish to teach about indigenous groups and the many problems these groups are encountering.

This workshop is ideal for teachers of the following courses:
History
Economics
Science
World Geography

Objectives and outcomes to assist educators in:

  • Develop concern for indigenous issues.
  • Discuss the many definitions of culture and indigenous.
  • Introduce educators to problems facing indigenous groups as a result of globalization.
  • Learn how to incorporate indigenous groups and issues into the classroom.
  • Discuss methods of how to use case studies to promote academic enrichment.

What is the purpose of teaching about indigenous groups?

  • Students will gain an understanding of what culture means and how it can be interpreted.
  • Students will be able to define indigenous groups
  • Students will use an indigenous group as a case study for meeting economic and history standards.

How Louisiana Social Studies content standards will be met:

  • 1. Who is indigenous? What is culture? G-1B-E2 – identifying and describing the human characteristics of places, including population distributions and culture; H-1C-M1 – describing the earliest human communities.
  • 2. Where do indigenous people live? G-1C-E3 – describing and explaining the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations; G-1C-E4 – identifying and comparing the cultural characteristics of different regions and people.
  • 3. These groups are under constant threat from the state who are seeking control of their land and natural resources. G-1D-E4 – describing the use, distribution, and importance of natural resources; G-1C-M3 – describing the characteristics and patterns of human settlement in different regions of the world and analyzing the impact of urbanization; G-1D-H3 – analyzing the relationship between natural resources and the exploration, colonization, settlement, and uses of land in different regions of the world.
  • 4. How does location influence culture? G-1B-H4 – explaining and evaluating the importance of places and regions to cultural identity; G-1D-H4 – evaluating policies and programs related to the use of natural resources.
  • 5. How did colonialization effect indigenous peoples? How has globalization affected them? What were some of the major drive forces between the conquest of the new world? H-1A-M5 – identifying issues and problems from the past and evaluating alternative courses of action; H-1B-M5 – analyzing the impact of European cultural, political, and economic ideas and institutions on life in the Americas; H-1A-H6 – analyzing cause-effect relationships; H-1B-H1 – analyzing the significant changes that resulted from interactions among the peoples of Europe, Africa, and the Americas; E-1A-E1 – recognizing that limited resources require people to make decisions; E-1A-M1 – describing how the scarcity of resources necessitates decision making at both personal and societal levels; E-1A-M9 – using economic concepts to help explain historic and contemporary events and developments; E-1B-H4 – analyzing the causes and consequences of worldwide economic interdependence.

Latin American Identity through Music
Spotlight: Afro-Peruvian Music
Thursday, April 24, 2003
1:00 – 4:00 PM

For any musical innovation is full of danger to the whole State, and ought to be prohibited. So Damon tells me, and I can quite believe him; he says that when modes of music change, the fundamental laws of the State always change with them”.
—Plato, The Republic, Book IV

In the face of political repression and discrimination, Latin American cultural groups have often found a voice through music. During the 1960s, the New Song developed in Latin America, which was a combination of traditional folk music and socially relevant lyrics. In countries like Chile and Argentina, this form of social protest was banned leaving many of the artists to be forced into exile. In this workshop, Tulane ethnomusicology professor Javier León, will lead a discussion on ways to use music in a k12 classroom in order to teach about the history, culture, and traditions of Latin America.

This workshop is suitable for:
Foreign Language
Social Studies
Language Arts
Music

Objectives and Outcomes:

  • Discuss ways to use music to teach history, culture, and tradition.
  • Develop methods of incorporating Gardner’s Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal/Social Intelligences.
  • To teach students how to extract information from such common means of expression as music, story telling, and dance.
  • Discuss ways in which music has served as a vehicle for social mobilization and protest.
  • Discuss stylistic differences between different types of music in a particular country that can be used as a way of highlighting ethnic and cultural differences within that nation.
  • Tracing the musical development of a particular genre of music over several decades can serve as a good foreground with which to discuss the broader social history of a particular country.

This workshop will focus on many of the Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills:

  • 1. Communication: A process by which information is exchanged and a concept of “meaning” is created and shared between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently, strategically, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing.
  • 2. Resource Access and Utilization: The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technologies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies.
  • 3. Linking and Generating Knowledge: The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In [Order] to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transfer and elaborate on these processes. “Transfer” refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. “Elaboration” refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts.

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Upcoming Events

The Latin American Library's Annual Open House

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The Latin American Library will be hosting its annual open house event on Friday, September 21. This annual event will welcome back faculty, students, staff, and friends from the New Orleans community. The event will include a talk by Colombian visual artist Erika Diettes, an exhibit of recent acquisitions, a book sale, and as always much more!

The event is free and open to the public.

For more information contact Madeline White via email (mwhite7@tulane.edu) or by phone at (504) 865-5681.

MARI Brown Bag Series to host PhD candidate Evan Parker for talk on jade offerings in Maya plaza

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The Middle American Research Institute is happy to announce the first talk of the 2018-2019 Brown Bag talk series. Evan Parker, Ph.D Candidate in the Department of Anthropology, will present his research in a talk titled The Tzimin Jades of Paso del Macho: Description and Analysis of a Middle Preclassic Maya Plaza Offering.

MARI’s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Jessica Melancon (jmelanc1@tulane.edu) for more information.

For the current speaker list of this talk series, visit the MARI Brown Bag website.

Film Screening: El Súper with filmmaker Iván Acosta

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The 1979 film version of Cuban filmmaker Ivan Acosta’s award-winning play El Súper, which gained critical and international success for its depiction of exiled Cubans in New York City, will be screened. Mr. Acosta will be in attendance and a discussion in English will follow. Iván Acosta is a playwright, filmmaker, and creative director originally from Santiago de Cuba, now in New York City. His creative endeavors include documentaries, plays, films, and books, and he’s served as writer, director, and producer, among other roles.

A small reception will follow the screening. Seating may be limited. Admission is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/1979/04/29/archives/the-screen-el-super-a-cubanamerican-tale-the-cast.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.

Equity speaker series to host panel on navigating immigrant relations in the current political climate

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The Center for Academic Equity at Tulane University is proud to present Border Li(n)es: Excluding, Extracting, and Expelling Immigrants in the Southern U.S. on September 25, 2018 at 7:00 PM as part of the Equity Speaker Series.

Following a summer of turbulent immigration relations in the United States, the Fall 2018 Equity Speaker Panel will focus on immigration on our Southern border and will feature specialists whose experiences vary from grassroots to professorial work. Panelists will include Josiah Heyman, Director of the Center for Inter-American and Border Studies, Ronald Martinez, New Orleans immigrant activist and spokesperson for the Congress of Day Laborers, Hiroko Kusuda, Clinical Professor and Director of Immigration Law at the Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice at Loyola, and Laila Hlass, Clinical Professor of Law at Tulane Law School and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies.

These four distinguished speakers will share the stage of Freeman Auditorium to discuss the drastic variation in immigrant relations across the national, regional, and local spaces and ways that members of American society may become engaged in or change the now toxic and polarized political climate. This inaugural discussion will be followed by a question and answer session.

See also Tulane New Wave for more information and a description of the event.




Cover photo from CNN story What the US-Mexico border looks like before Trump’s wall.

Mexican Cultural Institute's new exhibition features Hispanic women artists' empowerment and identity

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The Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation is proud to announce the opening of the groundbreaking exhibition Hispanic Women Making Art: Creative Empowerment and Identity. The exhibition will feature artists Verónica Bapé, Belinda Flores-Shinshillas, Ana Hernandez, Josephine Sacabo, Laura Velez and Luba Zygarewicz and is curated by Marcela Correa, MFA.

The opening reception will be held on September 26 from 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM. The exhibition will be open beginning September 26 and continue through November 24, 2018. For more information, please visit the Mexican Cultural Institute website.

Cover photo is a work by Verónica Bapé from the series ABUNDANTE COSA 1 MES 1 ARTISTA.

In 2018 the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico established the Mexican Cultural Institute in New Orleans. The primary objective of the Mexican Cultural Institute is to promote the image of Mexico by supporting cultural expressions in its broadest and fullest sense, including multidisciplinary forms like visual arts, music, performing arts, film, literature and gastronomy. The mission of the Cultural Institutes is to be protagonists of the cultural scene in their different host cities.


Iván Acosta book presentation: With A Cuban Song in the Heart / Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón

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Iván Acosta will present his memoir, With a Cuban Song in the Heart/ Con Una Canción Cubana en el Corazón, published by Un-Gyve Press, 2017. At this event, Mr. Acosta will incorporate his favorite Cuban songs in a musical and historical journey. His book features artwork from 280 album covers in his private collection and weaves a rich narrative combining real life experiences from his childhood in Santiago, Cuba along with tidbits of local lore and historical references. His favorite songs will be performed by local performers during the presentation.
This fascinating presentation, starting at 6:00PM, will be held at Tulane University in the Freeman Auditorium of the Newcomb Art Building (in Newcomb Circle) New Orleans, LA, 70118. A book signing and reception will follow on Woodward Way, right outside the Freeman Auditorium and in the Newcomb Art Museum. The book will be available for purchase for $60.00.

This event is free and open to the public. For questions email ccsi@tulane.edu.

For further reading visit: https://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/16/nyregion/public-lives-cuba-on-his-mind-the-dual-life-of-an-artist-exile.html


Collaborators of these events with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and Tulane’s Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute include Beatriz Ball, the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Louisiana, the Newcomb Art Museum, Park View Historic Hotel, and St. Mary’s Dominican High School.