Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Latin American Resource Center

Spring 2003

Culture Clash: Indigenous Groups meet the Modern World
Thursday, March 20, 2003
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Today indigenous cultures make up the majority of the populations in a number of Latin American countries, with many of these groups still occupying their original lands. With modern society rapidly approaching these native “territories”, indigenous populations throughout Latin America and the world, are being forced into submission by powerful governments and even more powerful multi-national corporations. Through struggles over land, water, and minerals, indigenous groups are now being pushed out of their ancestral lands by governments and corporations seeking to monopolize their often rich natural resources.

In this workshop we will discuss definitions of culture, how it is being preserved, and why it is important; define the term indigenous; give numerous examples of indigenous populations; focus on ways to use indigenous groups as case studies in order to address a variety of content standards. We will also look at teaching materials available to educators who wish to teach about indigenous groups and the many problems these groups are encountering.

This workshop is ideal for teachers of the following courses:
History
Economics
Science
World Geography

Objectives and outcomes to assist educators in:

  • Develop concern for indigenous issues.
  • Discuss the many definitions of culture and indigenous.
  • Introduce educators to problems facing indigenous groups as a result of globalization.
  • Learn how to incorporate indigenous groups and issues into the classroom.
  • Discuss methods of how to use case studies to promote academic enrichment.

What is the purpose of teaching about indigenous groups?

  • Students will gain an understanding of what culture means and how it can be interpreted.
  • Students will be able to define indigenous groups
  • Students will use an indigenous group as a case study for meeting economic and history standards.

How Louisiana Social Studies content standards will be met:

  • 1. Who is indigenous? What is culture? G-1B-E2 – identifying and describing the human characteristics of places, including population distributions and culture; H-1C-M1 – describing the earliest human communities.
  • 2. Where do indigenous people live? G-1C-E3 – describing and explaining the characteristics, distribution, and migration of human populations; G-1C-E4 – identifying and comparing the cultural characteristics of different regions and people.
  • 3. These groups are under constant threat from the state who are seeking control of their land and natural resources. G-1D-E4 – describing the use, distribution, and importance of natural resources; G-1C-M3 – describing the characteristics and patterns of human settlement in different regions of the world and analyzing the impact of urbanization; G-1D-H3 – analyzing the relationship between natural resources and the exploration, colonization, settlement, and uses of land in different regions of the world.
  • 4. How does location influence culture? G-1B-H4 – explaining and evaluating the importance of places and regions to cultural identity; G-1D-H4 – evaluating policies and programs related to the use of natural resources.
  • 5. How did colonialization effect indigenous peoples? How has globalization affected them? What were some of the major drive forces between the conquest of the new world? H-1A-M5 – identifying issues and problems from the past and evaluating alternative courses of action; H-1B-M5 – analyzing the impact of European cultural, political, and economic ideas and institutions on life in the Americas; H-1A-H6 – analyzing cause-effect relationships; H-1B-H1 – analyzing the significant changes that resulted from interactions among the peoples of Europe, Africa, and the Americas; E-1A-E1 – recognizing that limited resources require people to make decisions; E-1A-M1 – describing how the scarcity of resources necessitates decision making at both personal and societal levels; E-1A-M9 – using economic concepts to help explain historic and contemporary events and developments; E-1B-H4 – analyzing the causes and consequences of worldwide economic interdependence.

Latin American Identity through Music
Spotlight: Afro-Peruvian Music
Thursday, April 24, 2003
1:00 – 4:00 PM

For any musical innovation is full of danger to the whole State, and ought to be prohibited. So Damon tells me, and I can quite believe him; he says that when modes of music change, the fundamental laws of the State always change with them”.
—Plato, The Republic, Book IV

In the face of political repression and discrimination, Latin American cultural groups have often found a voice through music. During the 1960s, the New Song developed in Latin America, which was a combination of traditional folk music and socially relevant lyrics. In countries like Chile and Argentina, this form of social protest was banned leaving many of the artists to be forced into exile. In this workshop, Tulane ethnomusicology professor Javier León, will lead a discussion on ways to use music in a k12 classroom in order to teach about the history, culture, and traditions of Latin America.

This workshop is suitable for:
Foreign Language
Social Studies
Language Arts
Music

Objectives and Outcomes:

  • Discuss ways to use music to teach history, culture, and tradition.
  • Develop methods of incorporating Gardner’s Musical/Rhythmic and Interpersonal/Social Intelligences.
  • To teach students how to extract information from such common means of expression as music, story telling, and dance.
  • Discuss ways in which music has served as a vehicle for social mobilization and protest.
  • Discuss stylistic differences between different types of music in a particular country that can be used as a way of highlighting ethnic and cultural differences within that nation.
  • Tracing the musical development of a particular genre of music over several decades can serve as a good foreground with which to discuss the broader social history of a particular country.

This workshop will focus on many of the Louisiana Content Standards Foundation Skills:

  • 1. Communication: A process by which information is exchanged and a concept of “meaning” is created and shared between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs, or behavior. Students should be able to communicate clearly, fluently, strategically, technologically, critically, and creatively in society and in a variety of workplaces. This process can best be accomplished through use of the following skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing.
  • 2. Resource Access and Utilization: The process of identifying, locating, selecting, and using resource tools to help in analyzing, synthesizing, and communicating information. The identification and employment of appropriate tools, techniques, and technologies are essential to all learning processes. These resource tools include pen, pencil, and paper; audio/video materials, word processors, computers, interactive devices, telecommunication, and other emerging technologies.
  • 3. Linking and Generating Knowledge: The effective use of cognitive processes to generate and link knowledge across the disciplines and in a variety of contexts. In [Order] to engage in the principles of continual improvement, students must be able to transfer and elaborate on these processes. “Transfer” refers to the ability to apply a strategy or content knowledge effectively in a setting or context other than that in which it was originally learned. “Elaboration” refers to monitoring, adjusting, and expanding strategies into other contexts.

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Apply for the Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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Teaching Cuban Culture & Society: A Summer Educator Institute in Cuba
Havana, Cuba | June 23 – July 7, 2018
Program Application
Application Deadline: March 2, 2018

Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University join forces with the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies to take K-16 educators to Cuba. This is our fourth year running the Cuban Culture & Society K-16 Educator Institute and we are excited about this year’s itinerary. The institute will approach Cuban society and culture form a multidisciplinary perspective focused on the arts, the geography, and history of the country. Innovative programming and annual summer teacher institutes over the past three years provide the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and studying the region. Taking advantage of Tulane’s relationship with the University of Havana and Cuba’s National Union of Writers and Artists, the institute equips teachers with multidisciplinary content, curricular resources, and methods of inquiry for developing that approach in their K-16 classrooms. Conducted in English by Professor Carolina Caballero, the institute will explore current trends and issues in Cuban culture and society through readings, films, and lectures. The program includes a series of talks by prominent Cuban intellectuals and local field trips to important political and cultural sights throughout Havana.

This two-week program provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and country that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don’t miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

The trip will include a pre-departure orientation and two weeks in Cuba. The institute incorporates visits to local museums and exposes participants to arts organizations, schools, and teachers from the country’s national literacy campaign. Participants will stay within walking distance of the Malecón, the university, and many cultural venues. There will be group excursions to the historic Che Guevara monument, a visit to the site of the Bay of Pigs invasion, and a special visit to the town of Hershey, the town developed by Milton Hershey to begin his chocolate enterprise with the sugar from Cuba’s plantations. There will also be group excursions to the historic cities of Trinidad and Cienfuegos, Playa Girón, and Viñales, focusing on their role in the development of the economy and culture of the country

PROGRAM COST: $3,500
The cost will include a shared room and two meals a day, medical insurance, airfare to/from Havana from Tampa, Florida*, airport transportation in Havana to/from residence, OFAC-licensed academic visa, and specialized tours and outings.

*Airfare to/from Tampa, Florida, a one-night hotel stay in Tampa, incidental costs, and extra meals and expenses are not included in the program cost. You are responsible for your own air flight to/from Tampa, FL.

PROGRAM APPLICATION
Those interested in applying must be a K-16 educator or librarian. There is no Spanish language requirement for this program. The application deadline is March 2, 2018, at 5:00 PM.

Please note: This program is only open to K-16 educators who are currently teaching, are pre-service teachers or are serving in a school or public library.

PROPOSED ITINERARY – 15 DAYS
Please be advised that this itinerary is subject to change based on availability in Cuba. The itinerary below is the schedule from the 2017 institute.

  • Day 1 – U.S./HAVANA, CUBA
    Depart from Tampa, FL, Upon arrival, enjoy dinner and a welcome reception followed by an informal walk and people watching on the Malecón.
  • Day 2 – HAVANA
    Habana Vieja (Old Havana) Tour with local preservation experts to discuss in depth the history of local landmarks, historical preservation efforts, and future plans. Visit Muraleando Lawton, a community art project in the Lawton neighborhood of Havana. Hear from the founders of this project on how the neighborhood developed to promote skills in the community and support the local economy and meet with local community leaders, students and elderly folks at the community center.
  • Day 3 – HAVANA
    Lecture with Professor Carlos Alzugaray on Cuba Since the Special Period. Visit the elementary school Sergio Luis Ferriol in Habana Vieja. Connect with teachers and administrators about their experiences in the classroom.
  • Day 4 – HAVANA
    Visit the Museo Nacional de la Alfabetización (National Museum of the Literacy Campaign) and connect with members of the literacy brigade, teachers from the literacy campaign.
  • Day 5 – HAVANA
    Visit and explore Ernest Hemingway’s house. Have lunch in the infamous fishing village of Cojimar. In the afternoon, explore art by taking a tour of the Cuban Collection of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes accompanied by a curator then visit with artists at the Taller de Gráfica.
  • Day 6 – HERSHEY
    Day trip to the Hershey, Cuba and nature park. The site where famous chocolatier Milton Hershey developed his chocolate business by setting up sugar mills in the early 1900’s. Explore the natural side of Cuba in this country town.
  • Day 7 – HAVANA
    Learn about children’s literature and the book publishing business in Cuba by visiting Cuba’s national publisher UNEAC and hear first hand from children’s book authors. We will hear from children’s book author Olga Marta Pérez about the children’s/ youth Literacy Scene in Cuba today.
  • Day 8 – HAVANA/REGLA
    Take the ferry across the bay in Havana to the town of Regla to learn about Afro-Cuban dance and music from musicologist Cari Diez and an Afro-Cuban dance performance group.
  • Day 9 – SANTA CLARA, TRINIDAD
    Travel to Trinidad via Santa Clara, a town founded by 175 people on July 15, 1689. It is the site of the last battle in the Cuban Revolution in 1958. Visit to the Che Mausoleum in Santa Clara. Also visit the historic sugar plantation of Manaca Iznaga before arriving in Trinidad.
  • Day 10 – TRINIDAD
    Explore this UNESCO World Heritage site, founded on December 23, 1514 by Diego Velázquez de Cuellar. Trinidad was a central piece of Cuba’s sugar-based economy. Guided city tour with the city historian. Visit the Trinidad library to learn about the importance of libraries and debate questions of intellectual freedom with the staff.
  • Day 11 – PLAYA GIRON (SITE OF BAY OF PIGS) Ciénega de Zapata, Playa Larga
    Day excursion to the historic site of the Bay of Pigs, one of the landing sites for the 1961 US-backed invasion. Visit the Finca Fiesta Campesina farm, the Playa Girón museum, the Parque Ciénaga de Zapata, the Laguna del Tesoro, and the Taino Indian village. Snorkel in the Bay of Pigs!
  • Day 12 – HAVANA
    Visit the U.S. Embassy and hear first-hand about the state of current relations between the U.S. and Cuba. In the afternoon, we head over to meet up with the famous hip-hop group, Obsesión to hear about their music and experience as hip-hop artists in Cuba.
  • Day 13 – MATANZAS/VARADERO
    Take a day trip to Matanzas, the capital of the Cuban province of Matanzas. Known for its poets, culture, and Afro-Cuban folklore, we will explore the Triunvirato Plantation and the Castillo San Severino where we will hear about the history of slavery in Cuba. The rest of the afternoon we relax and explore the beautiful beaches of Varadero, a popular resort town covering Cuba’s narrow Hicacos Peninsula.
  • Day 14 – HAVANA
    Wrap-up curriculum workshop followed by a free afternoon ending in a celebratory dinner.
  • Day 15 – HAVANA/U.S.
    Morning departure for the U.S.

Explore our past trips through these photos and curricula:

Program Application

For more information, please contact Denise Woltering-Vargas at dwolteri@tulane.edu or call the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at 504-862-3143.

Apply for the Summer 2018 Teaching Brazil Teacher Institute

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Teaching Brazil: Expanding Perspectives on Colonial History
K-12 Educator Summer Institute

Salvador, Rio de Janeiro & Sao Paulo, Brazil | July 7 – July 17, 2018

DEADLINE TO APPLY AS A CURRICULUM WRITER EXTENDED: MARCH 9, 2018

The centers for Latin American Studies at Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, with support from the University of Georgia will take K-16 educators in various disciplines to Brazil. The institute will approach Brazilian culture from a multidisciplinary perspective focused on colonialization. The trip will include a pre-departure orientation and two weeks of overseas travel. The institute will explore the cities of Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, and São Paulo to focus on their respective role in colonial history.

Innovative programming and annual summer teacher institutes over the past five years by the three institutes provide the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to teaching and studying the region. Taking advantage of each institution’s strength, the institute equips teachers with multidisciplinary content, curricular resources, and methods of inquiry for deploying that approach themselves in their K-12 classrooms, creating a model that is generative of innovative approaches to K-12 education more broadly.

Objectives:

  • Advance and disseminate knowledge of Brazil by providing opportunities fro K-12 educators to experience first-hand the history, politics, language, and culture of Brazil;
  • Provide introductory Portuguese language training that emphasizes regional linguistic variations;
  • Contribute to the development of internationalizing curriculum that accurately and effectively brings Brazil into the classroom through standards-based approaches.

REGISTRATION

Thanks to a U.S. Department of Education National Resource Center grant, this program is able to provide a special opportunity for educators to participate as Curriculum Writers at a reduced program cost. There are limited spots to participate as a curriculum writer so please get your applications submitted early! Please note that curriculum writers are responsible for submitting a curriculum by August 1, 2018. See the Curriculum Writer Guidelines for more information and check below on how to apply.

Curriculum Writer program cost: $1373 + internal airfare estimated at $300
Deadline to Register as a Curriculum Writer EXTENDED: MARCH 9, 2018

Regular Program Cost: $2,744 + internal airfare (approximately $300)
Deadline to Register: MARCH 15, 2018

PROGRAM COST INCLUDES:

  • 10 nights lodging;
  • 2 meals a day;
  • gratuities;
  • in-country transportation;
  • internet;
  • liability insurance;
  • medical evacuation insurance

NOT INCLUDED:

  • International round-trip airfare TO Brazil (we meet in Salvador and leave from Sao Paulo)
  • Hotel extras;
  • Meals not included in itinerary
  • Optional activities covered by individuals;
  • Individual travel insurance;
  • Visa fees

Cards will be charged 50% on March 19, 2018 and the remainder April 19, 2018.

In order to register, please:

1) Complete the registration form
2) Apply to be a Curriculum Writer (see instructions below).

Deadlines:

  • February 26, 2018: Deadline to apply for Curriculum Writer Scholarship
  • February 28, 2018: Winners of Curriculum Writer Scholarships will be notified
  • March 5, 2018: Deadline to accept conditions of Curriculum Writer Scholarship and return letter of commitment to Denise Woltering Vargas [dwolteri@tulane.edu] and Colleen McCoy [colleen.e.mccoy@vanderbilt.edu]
  • March 15, 2018: Final Deadline to Register for Brazil Institute 2018

INSTRUCTIONS TO APPLY FOR THE CURRICULUM WRITER SCHOLARSHIP
Thanks to a U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant, Tulane University, Vanderbilt University, and The University of Georgia are able to provide funding for K-16 teachers interested in developing a curriculum as part of their participation in this 2018 summer teacher institute to Brazil. Curriculum writers will be charged a discounted in-country program fee of $1373 + internal airfare (apx. $300) and international airfare. You must commit to writing a curriculum project – check out the Curriculum Writer Guidelines here. There are limited spots for this opportunity, please apply early. If you would like to apply to be a curriculum writer for this summer’s teacher institute in Brazil, please:

1) fill out the contact form HERE
2) submit the CURRICULUM WRITER APPLICATION by FEBRUARY 26, 2018 to crcrts@tulane.edu or mail to Denise Woltering Vargas at Tulane University, 100 Jones Hall, 6801 Freret Ave., New Orleans, LA 70118.
Please call 504-862-3143 with any questions.

La Hora del Cuento: Summer Bilingual Story Hour at the Pebbles Center

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This summer, join us for La hora del cuenta bilingual readings series at the Pebbles Centers of the New Orleans Public Libraries!

On the first and last Saturday of every month, we will read a bilingual book at the Algiers Regional Library and the Children’s Resource Center Library beginning on Saturday April 28 until Saturday, August 25. Children and parents welcome!

Story Hours Dates and Locations

Algiers Regional Branch
Saturday, May 5
2:30 PM

Saturday, June 2
2:30 PM

Saturday, July 7
2:30 PM

Saturday, August 4
2:30 PM

Children’s Resource Center Library
Saturday, April 28
12:00 PM

Saturday, May 26
12:00 PM

Saturday, June 30
12:00 PM

Saturday, July 28
12:00 PM

Saturday, August 25
12:00 PM