Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

To go directly to the online application system, click here.

The Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies is one of the largest and most prestigious interdisciplinary units at Tulane University. It functions in many capacities to provide programming and degree plans to a broad range of educational constituencies. Currently, these include a Bachelor of Arts major and minor in Latin American Studies, a Master of Arts degree in Latin American Studies, and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Latin American Studies.

The design of both the M.A. and Ph.D. curriculum in Latin American Studies is dependent upon the student’s particular research interests. The Graduate Advisor and the student will discuss these research interests before the start of the student’s first semester of coursework and will map out a comprehensive program of study with the goal of developing an interdisciplinary research project. Students accumulate the research skills and tools by undertaking coursework in multiple disciplines or fields. Students should expect to narrow their coursework to one primary and two secondary concentration areas. Of course, there is also the opportunity to extend one’s coursework beyond these three concentration areas when the research project will be enhanced by doing so.

The Stone Center also collaborates with other units across the University to offer specialized graduate degree programs. Such programs include joint professional degree programs with the Law School (MA/JD) and the Business School (MA/MBA), and a dual Doctor of Philosophy degrees (a Ph.D. in Latin American Studies and Art History). For further information on these specialized degree programs, please consult the relevant sections that appear later in this guide.

The standard Tulane University graduate program application form allows applicants to identify whether their application should be considered for admission either as an M.A. student or as a Ph.D. student. The admissions policy of the Stone Center, however, is to consider for admission directly to the Ph.D. program only individuals who have an earned Master’s Degree or relevant professional degree (i.e. M.D., J.D., etc.)

Applicants interested in the Ph.D. Program in Latin American Studies, but who do not have an earned Master’s Degree or a relevant professional degree, will be considered for admission only to the M.A. program in Latin American Studies. Upon completion of the M.A. Program in Latin American Studies, such students are then able to reapply to the Ph.D. program. Admission to the M.A. program does not guarantee continuation in the Ph.D. program.

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Upcoming Events

Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom with Américas Award Books

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Américas Award K-12 Workshop

In celebration of the 2014 Américas Award, CLASP and Teaching for Change are hosting a K-12 teacher workshop “Exploring Immigration and Identity in the K-12 Classroom with Américas Award Books.”

This hands-on workshop will explore issues of immigration and identity using children's literature. The workshop will feature the work of this year's Honorable Mention book, Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote by Duncan Tonatiuh and Commended Title Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick your Ass by Meg Medina. Both authors will be in attendance to work with teachers on activities and strategies to best engage young readers with the complexity of immigration as it relates to family, education, and identity. Teaching for Change will highlight additional resources to incorporate teaching Social Justice and Human Rights.

All participants will receive breakfast, teaching resources, and a book (a choice of one of the two featured titles, please indicate whether you’d prefer the picture book Pancho Rabbit and the Coyote or the Young Adult title, Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass). Participants are also invited to attend the Américas Award Ceremony to be held at the Library of Congress from 3:00 – 5:00 PM. Also, a month-long exhibit of the original artwork from Parrots Over Puerto Rico will be on display at the Young Readers Center in The Library of Congress.

For a workshop schedule and to access resources from the workshop, please visit the workshop website or download the agenda here

The Américas Award is sponsored by CLASP and coordinated by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University. Additional funding is provided by Florida International University, Stanford University, The Ohio State University, University of New Mexico, University of Utah, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and Vanderbilt University.

For more information contact Denise Woltering (dwolteri@tulane.edu) (504.865.5164)

Download the printable Flyer.

Geometry, gigantism, and lacquerware, or, the origins of social hierarchy

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The Tulane Anthropology Student Association (TASA) presents a talk by Dr. William Balée, Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University. The talk is entitled: “Geometry, gigantism, and lacquerware, or, the origins of social hierarchy.”

A reception will follow.

For more information contact TASA (tulaneasa@gmail.com)

MARI Brown Bag: Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown "Maya Boomtown Archaeology? Recent and Future Investigations at Alabama, Belize"

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Dr. Meaghan Peuramaki-Brown, a visiting scholar at MARI, will present new information about her research at the site of Alabama in southern Belize in a talk entitled “Maya Boomtown Archaeology? Recent and Future Investigations at Alabama, Belize”

M.A.R.I.‘s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

Geography is not Destiny and History need not Repeat: Don Leondard

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The first talk of the Tulane University Political Science Seminar takes place on Friday, October 3rd in Norman Mayer 125A. The speaker will be Don Leonard (CIPR Post-Doctoral Fellow) who will present a paper entitled "Geography is not Destiny and History need not Repeat: Trade Politics and State Development in Latin America."

Why are some societies more prosperous than others? Geographic endowments have been found to shape the development trajectories of nations directly, as well as indirectly through their effect on the quality of the political institutions that emerge during colonization. In these latter accounts, stability in the underlying distribution of income within a society accounts for the persistence of 'good' or 'bad' institutions by determining who has the power to shape the economic purpose of the state. In contrast, comparative historical analysis of state development on the island of Hispaniola identifies conditions under which exogenous changes in exposure to international trade can alter the development trajectories of societies by reshaping the distribution of income and power within them, as well as the preferences of the powerful over institutional purpose. These findings challenge existing theories of state development that emphasize the path-dependent effects of geography and colonial legacy.

For a draft of Dr. Leonard’s paper, please click here.

Day of the Dead and the Arts: A Workshop for K-12 Art Educators

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art are sponsoring a K-12 teacher workshop to celebrate Day of the Dead!

The workshop will focus on how to provide students with information about Day of the Dead, Day of the Dead traditions, and celebrating Day of the Dead in the classroom. The workshop will involve hands-on activities, including activities which will translate into the classroom!

All participants will receive light refreshments and teaching materials. One teacher will have the opportunity to use a Day of the Dead altar kit, provided by the Latin American Resource Center. The kit has everything you need to celebrate Day of the Dead in your classroom!

For a complete schedule and more information on the presentations visit the workshop website or download a PDF version. The website also contains a link to the pre-workshop survey which should be filled out prior to arriving at the workshop.

Chep Morrison: Reconnecting New Orleans and Latin America

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In Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month the 2nd Thursday Lecture Series at the Louisiana State Museum will present a talk entitled “Chep Morrison: Reconnecting New Orleans and Latin America” by Robert Gray Freeland

Four times mayor of New Orleans, Morrison was probably the best-known US citizen in Latin America in his day. As a Mayor interested in expanding international trade, he created a distinct Latin flavor in his efforts. As Ambassador of the Organization of American States (OAS), Morrison played an important part in the Kennedy Administration implementation of a Good Neighbor policy and the Alliance for Progress.