Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Grants & Funding

Academic Year

Students accepted into the M.A. and Ph.D. programs in Latin American Studies are eligible for two types of aid: Tulane School of Liberal Arts University Fellowships and U.S. Department of Education Foreign Language and Area Study (FLAS) Fellowships. Although the amount of financial aid and the general policies and procedures for students holding these fellowships are the similar, there are fundamental differences.

Graduate School Fellowships

School of Liberal Arts University Fellowships provide a fellowship stipend and a tuition waiver. As a condition of this funding, each fellow must provide either service or teaching for the Stone Center. M.A. Students must serve for 6 hours per week as a Research and Project Associate and Ph.D. Candidates must either serve as a Teaching Assistant or as a Research and Project Associate.

FLAS Fellowships

With funding for the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies is able to offer a special fellowship program to a select group of students. The goals of the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship program include: assisting in the development of knowledge, resources, and trained personnel for modern foreign language and area/international studies; stimulating the attainment of foreign language acquisition and fluency; and developing a pool of international experts to meet national needs. FLAS fellowships are available to those graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents, and are in need of attaining language proficiency in Portuguese, Haitian Creole, or an indigenous Latin American language. There are awards available for both the academic year and for summer intensive language study.

Academic year FLAS fellowships are awarded to those graduate students in Latin American Studies, Humanities, Social Sciences, or professional school programs whose program of study requires Portuguese or Haitian Creole. Benefits of an academic year FLAS fellowship include: a service-free fellowship stipend and a tuition waiver provided by the School of Liberal Arts. Only students enrolling in a graduate program within the School of Liberal Arts are eligible for the tuition waiver. Those students receiving a FLAS fellowship during the academic year must register for their required language course (most often Portuguese) over and above the normal course load of nine hours. Priority for funding of academic year FLAS fellowships goes to those students who demonstrate a need for proficiency in Portuguese or Haitian Creole. However the regular graduate application serves also as the FLAS application. There is no separate form or application for consideration of an academic year FLAS fellowship. Prospective graduate students interested in an academic year FLAS fellowship and who are applying to programs other than the Latin American Studies graduate program must request from the relevant school or program to which they are applying that their admissions application packet/materials be copied and forwarded to the Stone Center for Latin American Studies for FLAS fellowship consideration. The deadline for submitting these materials is Feb. 1 for fellowship consideration for the subsequent academic year. All prospective FLAS fellowship applicants should indicate in their graduate application statement of purpose the nature of their interest in and need for the study of either Portuguese or Haitian Creole and how the study of these languages will serve their future post-graduate career objectives.

Summer FLAS fellowships are administered separately from the academic year FLAS program and follow the guidelines and application process outlined below. Please consult the section on Summer FLAS fellowships below for more information.

Latin American Studies Graduate Student Conference Paper Presentation Travel Support
This program is exclusively for Latin American Studies graduate students at Tulane University. This program requires the actual presentation of a research paper at a recognized professional academic conference. It is intended to help offset some of the costs of travel to present at such a conference. It does not support simple conference attendance, nor does it support conference participation in any other capacity, nor does it support participation in workshops or seminars. Requests for funding must be made at least one month prior to the conference. Students are limited to no more than two conference travel grants per Academic Year. Applications will be considered on a first-come, first-serve basis for as long as funds are available. To apply for funding, please complete the Conference Travel Support Application Form. Applicants can choose a funding category of 1/2 the cost of airfare or a 2-day per diem rate as calculated by the U.S. Government.
IMPORTANT NOTE ON PER DIEM AWARDS: Per diem rates are usually a combination of separate rates for lodging and meals/incidentals, with a fixed amount allocated for lodging and another for meals/incidentals. The lodging portion of per diem rates will only be reimbursed up to, but not exceeding, either the actual costs of the lodging, or the per diem rate, whichever is lower. Please keep in mind that you will not be reimbursed the full per diem rate if the actual expense for your lodging is below the per diem rate for lodging. Likewise, the per diem amount for meals/incidentals is also fixed and may be used only for expenses related to the individual applicant. Reimbursement for meals/incidental expenses for other individuals is not permitted. All receipts for meals/incidental expenses must be submitted when the reimbursement request is made. The meals/incidentals portion of per diem rates will only be reimbursed up to, but not exceeding, either the actual costs of meals/incidental expenses, or the per diem rate, whichever is lower. Please keep in mind that you will not be reimbursed the full per diem rate if your actual meals/incidentals expenses are lower than the corresponding per diem rate. Meals are reimbursable, alcoholic drinks are not. Incidental expenses are non-meal expenses related directly to the costs of travel such as ground transport fares, tolls, etc. Conference registration is not an incidental expense related to the costs of travel and cannot be applied against the meals/incidental per diem award. Finally, the per diem award is not a guaranteed fixed amount that can be used to cover expenses beyond two days. The allocation is restricted to eligible expenses for two days. For instance, if your two-day per diem award is for $400 ($200 per day), and your actual eligible per diem expenses are $100 per day, then you are only eligible to receive $200 of the $400 award, even if your travel extends over a 4 day period. You cannot apply the $200 difference to cover expenses for the 3rd and 4th days. Please consult with us if you are driving, staying with a friend, or if there are any other special circumstances.

Summer Funding

Stone Center and Tinker Foundation Summer Field Research Grants
Application Deadline: March 23, 2015

Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2007
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2008
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2009
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2010
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2011
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2012
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2013
Read Graduate Student Summer Field Research Reports, 2014

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies invites all Tulane University graduate students engaged in the study of Latin America or the Caribbean to apply for funding to conduct field research outside of the United States during the summer of 2015. Funding is provided through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Tinker Foundation. These field research grants are not to be used for dissertation research, but rather to provide graduate students who have little to no field research experience with an opportunity to explore the feasibility of a particular field research project and to gain experience in conducting preliminary hands-on field research abroad.

For a successful grant proposal in the field of Public Health, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Natural/Biological Sciences, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Humanities, click here.
For a successful grant proposal in the Social Sciences, click here.

A complete application packet must include three documents:

Before applying, please read the program eligibility and application guidelines carefully.

FLAS Summer Fellowships
Application Deadline: February 20, 2015

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies receives funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Title VI program for Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. Part of the FLAS fellowships administered by the Stone Center are available to graduate students for the intensive study over the summer of Kaqchikel Maya, Portuguese, or another less-commonly taught Latin American language. Graduate students wishing to engage in intensive study of such a language are encouraged to apply for one of these fellowships. Only U.S. citizens or permanent residents are eligible to apply; and only intensive summer language programs approved by the U.S. Department of Education are eligible under this program. A listing of some of the approved programs is prepared by CLASP and available on-line. Program information and application packets for Tulane sponsored summer language programs can be found here. Our Summer FLAS FAQ attempts to answer questions about the FLAS Summer Fellowships for graduate students. The guidelines of this program are very specific, please read them carefully before applying.

A complete application packet must include three documents:

Submit all application materials to:
Stone Center for Latin American Studies
Attn: FLAS Fellowship
100 Jones Hall
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA 70118

For questions regarding the FLAS Fellowship, please contact Dr. Jimmy Huck by email at jhuck@tulane.edu

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Upcoming Events

A Presentation and Discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado

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The Payson Center for International Development and the center for Inter-American Policy and Research invite you to:
“The Political Economy of Legal Knowledge”

A presentation and discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado: Faculty of Law, University of the Andes, Bogota.

Dr. Bonilla is a constitutional law scholar and the author and editor of several books, including most recently Constitutionalism of the Global South. Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Lunch will be served. RSVP for lunch to: CIPR@tulane.edu

New Orleans and the Spanish World

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"New Orleans and the Spanish World” is the ninth installment of Musical Louisiana: America's Cultural Heritage, presented by the New Orleans Philharmonic Orchestra, The Historic New Orleans Collection, the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans, and Pan American Life. The popular series examines different aspects of the state's contributions to classical music with an annual free concert at St. Louis Cathedral. This year’s concert, New Orleans and the Spanish World, features music by composers including Ricardo Castro Herrera, Francisco Asenjo Barbieri, and Louis-Hector Berlioz. The concert will be conducted by Carlos Miguel Prieto and feature baritone Damian del Castillo, of Spain, and pianist Abdiel Vazquez, of Mexico.

Free and open to the public. Live streaming of the event can be seen at LPOmusic.com and WWNO will broadcast the concert live at 89.9 FM in the New Orleans area. For more information visit the LPO website.

LAL Greenleaf Fellow Work in Progress Talk by Eugenia López Velázquez

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk by Eugenia López Velázquez, LAL Greenleaf Fellow 2014-2015.
The talk will be in Spanish. Refreshments will follow.

Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos, en una época de transición (1765-1830)/Indian, Ladino and Mulatto Towns/Communities in an Age of Transition.

Talk abstract:
Se trata de un estudio dentro del territorio salvadoreño y del contexto centroamericano. Es una investigación que tiene por objeto estudiar las transformaciones ocurridas en los pueblos de indios, de mulato y de ladinos, dentro del período de transición, que va de los años de la aplicación de las reformas borbónicas de Carlos III, de la crisis monárquica e independencia, a los primeros años de vida independiente, en el período de la República Federal de Centro América. Se trata de una investigación en la que la vertiente central serán las prácticas de poder en el plano local, provincial y central para penetrar en dos realidades: en la política-administrativa y en lo socioeconómico. Dentro de esto se busca delinear las transformaciones de la vida de los pueblos, particularmente los cambios y continuidades en torno a la autonomía, los recursos, las corporaciones comunes y a la posesión de las tierras comunales y ejidales.

This project focuses on the territory of El Salvador, within a Central American context. The purpose is to study transformations in Indian, Ladino and Mulatto communities during the period of transition stretching from the Bourbon Reforms of Charles III through the crisis of the monarchy and political independence, to the initial years of independent life during the period of the Federal Republic of Central America. The project centers on the practices of power in local, provincial, and central spheres with a focus on political, administrative and socio-economic factors. The goal is to trace transformations in the life of these communities, especially changes and continuities surrounding autonomy, resources, communal corporations and the possession of communal lands and ejidos.

María Eugenia López Velásquez teaches history at Universidad de El Salvador in San Salvador. She holds a Licenciatura in History at Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico, and an M.A. in Modern and contemporary history from Instituto Mora in Mexico City. Her thesis on on the role of Salvadoran elites during the period of annexation to Mexico (1821-1823) was published as a monograph in 2000 by CONCULTURA. María Eugenia López has also received archival training, and from 1998 to 2005 she was Director of the National Archives of El Salvador. She is the author of numerous articles on Salvadoran history, particularly the colonial and early Independence periods; she has written as well on oral histories and archives in her country. She is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Sciences at Colegio de Michoacán in Mexico working on a dissertation on Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos en una época de transición (1765-1830).

Mobilizing at the Margins: Citizenship, Identity, and Democracy

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Tulane University's Latin American Graduate Organization invites your attendance at the 2015 Graduate Conference where you can meet graduate scholars, faculty, and community leaders interested in Latin America, explore the city, and experience the unique Mardi Gras season in New Orleans!

This year's conference encourages participants to engage with historical and emerging confrontations and reconfigurations of national identification, expressions of individual or communal identity, performances of citizenship, and re-imaginings of democracy within the context of Latin America. Latin America and the Caribbean encompass vast cultural, linguistic, and geographic diversity, making the region a subject of prolific scholarly study across disciplines. Within this complexity, conceptualizations of citizenship, identity, and democracy are constantly being negotiated, contested, and reframed in a multitude of contexts. These various encounters highlight the ways in which individuals interact with their communities, how communities define themselves within and/or beyond the framework of national borders, and how power and politics play out in an increasingly interconnected and decentralized global community.

Our keynote speaker this year will be Dr. Lara Putnam. Lara Putnam is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research has explored labor migration; state racism; and the ways kinship, gender, and sexuality both shape and are shaped by large-scale political and economic shifts. Publications include Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age (UNC Press, 2013), The Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 (UNC Press, 2002), and recent articles in Modernism/Modernities, International Labor and Working-Class History, the Journal of British Studies, and Small Axe. Work in progress uses examples from the history of Venezuela, Trinidad, and Grenada to explore methodological and theoretical dilemmas within history's transnational and digital "turns."

Photographic Exhibit: "Mexico, World Heritage Cities"

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to present the photographic exhibit “Mexico, World Heritage Cities” from January 22 to February 15, 2015. An opening reception will be held on January 22nd at 6 PM.

To date 721 sites worldwide have been listed as World Heritage sites including 167 cities. Of these cities, 10 of them are located in Mexico. The cities were chosen due to their historic, architectural, and urban importance. They include Campeche, Guanajuato, Morelia, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, San Miguel, Zacatecas, and Mexico City.

Summer in Argentina Program Info Session

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TULANE SUMMER IN ARGENTINA PROGRAM
JUNE 14 – JULY 17, 2015
FREE FOOD!

Summer in Argentina is a Tulane-run five-week program in Buenos Aires, Argentina, that offers six credits of courses in Spanish and Political Science. It’s ideal for students who want to have an experience abroad and strengthen their Spanish skills, but cannot commit to a semester-long program. It’s also an outstanding opportunity for anything who wants to have a rich experience in one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world.

Come meet the director of the program, talk to alumni of the 2014 program, and enjoy some Argentine food!

A representative from the Stone Center for Latin American Studies will also be present, so bring all of your questions.

Wednesday, February 25
5:00-6:00PM
100A Jones Hall, Greenleaf Conference Room

For more information about the program, contact Professor Marilyn Miller (mgmiller_at_tulane.edu), or Laura Wise (sclassum_at_tulane.edu).