Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

For the Policies and Procedures of the University, please visit Tulane’s Student Resources information page.

Stone Center Policies

Grades

Students must maintain a 2.0 average in the major program to satisfy the degree requirements of Latin American Studies. The grade-point average is determined by dividing the total number of quality points by the total number of quality hours (see Undergraduate Catalogue for more information on quality points).

Federal law prohibits the release of grades or other confidential information to third parties, including parents and guardians, unless the student provides written authorization for release of such information to the associate dean. Such as request may be made by the student at any time.

Grievances and Grade Changes

When students have a complaint to register about a particular class, a professor or a grade, they should make an appointment with the Assistant Undergraduate Advisor.

In most cases grievances grow out of courses. It is important to understand that grievances attach to the department in which a course is offered. Thus, if a student in the Latin American Studies interdisciplinary program seeks to resolve a problem arising from a Sociology course, it must be pursued through the Sociology Department. Courses which originate in the Center for Latin American Studies will be handled by the appropriate Center administrators. In every case disputes are handled at the lowest level first (discuss the problem with the professor) and then move up the Center and, finally, college chain.

The university grievance policy is available either in the Center or in the college division office. It is a lengthy document which describes procedures to be followed when the Center procedures have not worked to satisfy all parties.

The Center for Latin American Studies policy is as follows:

  • The Executive Director designates the Undergraduate Advisor to serve as the chair of the grievance committee in the case of an undergraduate level grievance.
  • If the Undergraduate Advisor is the object of the grievance hearing or if some other conflict of interest arises, then the Executive Director of the Center will serve as the chair of the grievance committee.
  • If a complaint cannot be resolved by informal mediation within seven days of its referral to the Undergraduate Advisor, the student will be informed of his or her right to bring the matter before the Center grievance committee. The student will be granted 24 hours from the time of notification of right of grievance hearing to notify the chair of the committee of his or her decision to seek redress through the committee. The chair will schedule the hearings, if requested, within 48 hours of such notification.
  • Requests by parties involved in the grievance process for extensions of the above time limits shall be entertained by the chair and granted only in extreme cases.
  • The Center grievance committee shall consist of three faculty members. At least one will be a Latin americanist faculty member with a departmental affiliation. Members of the grievance committee will be appointed by the Executive Director and will serve for a term of three years.
  • The chair of the committee will advise the committee members of the name of the student and shall notify the student of the composition of the committee at least 24 hours before the hearing.
  • Requests by the student to remove a faculty member from the committee for cause or by committee members to remove themselves for cause shall be entertained by the chair of the committee and granted only in extreme cases.
  • The chair of the committee will not serve as a committee member but shall serve as moderator of all grievance hearings.
  • Both the student and the instructor have the right to submit written statements of their opinions concerning the grievance to the grievance committee and shall be encouraged to do so. Both parties shall also have the right to appear before the committee during the hearing and shall be encouraged to do so. Neither party is obligated to submit a written opinion nor to appear. Choice regarding these options shall not be weighed in committee deliberations.
  • Instructors against whom grievances are filed are obligated to submit to the committee all written materials (test, papers, record of grades, attendance and records, and so forth) which bear directly on the grievance case.
  • Parties giving testimony in a hearing shall be segregated before and during testimony.
  • Testimony, but not committee deliberation during a grievance, shall be tape-recorded and tapes kept on file for six months after the hearing.
  • The committee shall render a decision in the grievance matter within three days of the hearing. Committee records should contain not only the decision but an explanation of the grounds upon which the decision was reached. Summary statements of decisions and their grounds shall be sent by the chair of the committee to the student, the faculty member against whom the grievance was filed, and the dean of the college division.
  • If the Center grievance procedure does not achieve a mutually satisfactory conclusion, the student will have recourse to the university’s appellate procedures.

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Upcoming Events

Call For Papers- Haiti: Paradoxes, Contraditions, Intersections in the Making of a People

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Haitian Studies Association’s 29th Annual Conference

The Haitian Studies Association will hold its 29th Annual Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, a site that offers scholars a look at how the “making of the people” occurs outside of the geopolitical spaces associated with a nation-state. Indeed, the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 forced not only the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, but also the migration of slaves, slave owners, and free blacks and mulattos between the two former French territories. These movements of people led to the creation of new spaces where migrants linked to an emergent Haiti would become part of a new North American dynamic also characterized by inequalities and exclusion.

The Haitian Studies Association seeks a diverse set of scholarly interrogations of these themes from disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We are especially interested in fully constituted panels, and will prioritize panels that speak directly to our themes and attempt an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Panel and roundtable proposals are to be no longer than 500 words, clearly listing the individual paper titles and authors. Individual paper abstracts should be around 250 words. Presenters are expected to register for the conference in advance to ensure their names are in the program.

Proposals with be accepted until June 1st, 2017. Fore information regarding the conference and guidelines for proposals, click here.

Somos Nós: Brazil on the Move K-12 Educator Workshop

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LARC, along with Vanderbilt and the University of Georgia, is sponsoring a workshop on Brazilian culture and teaching Portuguese. K-16 educators of any discipline and grade-level are welcome to apply to attend this 5 day institute. Throughout the week, educators will work to develop interdisciplinary curricula, which they can bring back to their schools to teach and share with colleagues. The focus of the workshop will be the environment.

Register today!

Check out these photos from the 2015 workshop held in New Orleans.

Check out LARC’s curriculum on Brazil and Portuguese to get ready for the workshop!

Please visit the workshop webpage for more information.

K-14 Summer Educator Institute in Cuba

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Havana, Cuba | June 17 – July 1, 2017

The Application Deadline has Passed
$3,500.00 for 15 days

This two-week program through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, Cuban and Caribbean Studies, and in collaboration with Primary Source provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and country that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don’t miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

Tulane’s summer program is locally sponsored and supported by the National Union of Writers and Artists. Participants will stay within walking distance of the Malecón, the university, and several cultural venues. In addition to field trips in Havana, there will also be group excursions to the historic cities of Trinidad and Cienfuegos, the Che Guevara monument in Santa Clara, Playa Girón, and Viñales.

For more information and for the institute application, please visit the institute webpage.

Summer Reading at the Pebbles Center Algiers

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Celebrate and learn about Latin America with your kids through the Stone Center’s Pebble Center at the Algiers Regional branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time.

Our summer story hour will take place in June, July, and August on the second Tuesday of every month at 10:30 AM. All books are read in English and Spanish and readings are followed by an activity based on the book. Past books include Counting Ovejas, Drum Dream Girl, and Mango, Abuela, and Me. Readings are free and open to the public. Recommended ages 0 – 5 and parents!

Story Hour Dates/Themes

June 13
TBA

July 11
TBA

August 8
TBA