Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

The concentration system serves to focus the coursework of Latin American Studies majors and minors in one of the interdisciplinary themes that are the foundation of the Latin American Studies programs at Tulane. Working with the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs students assign the most appropriate concentration to their individual course of study. Seniors submit a formal description of their major including their concentration and core coursework in the Latin American Studies capstone class LAST 4000. The eight concentrations are:

  • Creativity
  • Encounter
  • Exchange
  • Identity
  • Land
  • Nation
  • People
  • Welfare

Sample Courses

Note that these lists are not comprehensive and do not account for all of the courses offered in each department nor those that might be offered as special topics in the departments or Latin American Studies. Courses taken abroad and on Tulane summer programs can also count toward the concentrations.

Creativity:

  • SPAN 4110: Latin American Literature
  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 6960: Ind. & Peasant Movements
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cult of the World
  • DANC 1920: Brazilian Dance: Samba
  • COMM 4190: Latin American Film

Encounter:

  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • INDV 4100: Info Tech and International Devt
  • ARHS 6730: Seminar in Maya Manuscripts

Exchange:

  • MKTG 4650: Global Marketing
  • ECON 3590: Economic Devt of Latin America
  • HISL 6850: US-Latin American Relations
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • SPAN 6220: Colonial Latin American Literature
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs

Identity:

  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 3950: Performing the Caribbean
  • COMM 4810: Media and Democracy in Latin America
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Performing Arts
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World
  • ANTH 6060: South American Indians

Land:

  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • INDV 6100: Environment and Development
  • SPAN 4510: Hispanic Cities
  • HISE 6330: Imperial Spain: 1469-1659
  • HTEL 4250: Cult in the Public Sphere

Nation:

  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Perf. Arts
  • HISL 3960: Andean Rebellions
  • HISL 3950: Inventing Argentina
  • POLC 3410: Politics and Nationalism
  • PORT 6160: Afro-Brazil

Peoples:

  • SPAN 6850: Women Authors of Latin America
  • SOCI 2490: Latin American Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • ANTH 6830: Aztec and Maya Literature
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World

Welfare:

  • SOCI 2490: Latin Am Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • *INHL 6830: Intl Health Policy
  • HISL 3780: Women in Latin Am History
  • POLS 3010: Poverty and Development
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs

*non LAS course; see the college SPC restrictions

LATEST SITE UPDATES

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Upcoming Events

Mesa Redonda/Round Table Discussion: U.S.-Cuba Relations

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¡Viva Cuba! Now what?

The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute presents a round table discussion on the restoration of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba, and what it may mean for life on the island. Panelists include Tulane students and faculty.

PANELISTS:

  • Dr. Ana M. López, Associate Provost, Director of CCSI, Professor of Communication
  • Dr. Martin Dimitrov, Associate Professor, Political Science
  • Dr. Annie Gibson, Professor of Practice, CGS
  • Jimena Codina, M.A. Candidate, Latin American Studies
  • Boris Martin, Ph.D Candidate, History
  • Dr. Carolina Caballero (moderator), Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese

All are welcome to attend. Q & A session to follow.
Friday, January 30th
4:30pm
100A Jones Hall
Greenleaf Conference Room

MARI Brown Bag: Christopher Rodning "Joara, Cuenca, and Fort San Juan: The Northern Borderlands of La Florida, 1566-1568"

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Dr. Christopher Rodning, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, will present on his research on Spanish contact with Native North Americans in the southeastern United States.

M.A.R.I.'s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

A Presentation and Discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado

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The Payson Center for International Development and the center for Inter-American Policy and Research invite you to:
“The Political Economy of Legal Knowledge”

A presentation and discussion with Dr. Daniel Bonilla Maldonado: Faculty of Law, University of the Andes, Bogota.

Dr. Bonilla is a constitutional law scholar and the author and editor of several books, including most recently Constitutionalism of the Global South. Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Lunch will be served. RSVP for lunch to: CIPR@tulane.edu

LAL Greenleaf Fellow Work in Progress Talk by Eugenia López Velázquez

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Please join us for a work-in-progress talk by Eugenia López Velázquez, LAL Greenleaf Fellow 2014-2015.
The talk will be in Spanish. Refreshments will follow.

Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos, en una época de transición (1765-1830)/Indian, Ladino and Mulatto Towns/Communities in an Age of Transition. Se trata de un estudio dentro del territorio salvadoreño y del contexto centroamericano. Es una investigación que tiene por objeto estudiar las transformaciones ocurridas en los pueblos de indios, de mulato y de ladinos, dentro del período de transición, que va de los años de la aplicación de las reformas borbónicas de Carlos III, de la crisis monárquica e independencia, a los primeros años de vida independiente, en el período de la República Federal de Centro América. Se trata de una investigación en la que la vertiente central serán las prácticas de poder en el plano local, provincial y central para penetrar en dos realidades: en la política-administrativa y en lo socioeconómico. Dentro de esto se busca delinear las transformaciones de la vida de los pueblos, particularmente los cambios y continuidades en torno a la autonomía, los recursos, las corporaciones comunes y a la posesión de las tierras comunales y ejidales. This project focuses on the territory of El Salvador, within a Central American context. The purpose is to study transformations in Indian, Ladino and Mulatto communities during the period of transition stretching from the Bourbon Reforms of Charles III through the crisis of the monarchy and political independence, to the initial years of independent life during the period of the Federal Republic of Central America. The project centers on the practices of power in local, provincial, and central spheres with a focus on political, administrative and socio-economic factors. The goal is to trace transformations in the life of these communities, especially changes and continuities surrounding autonomy, resources, communal corporations and the possession of communal lands and ejidos. María Eugenia López Velásquez teaches history at Universidad de El Salvador in San Salvador. She holds a Licenciatura in History at Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia in Mexico, and an M.A. in Modern and contemporary history from Instituto Mora in Mexico City. Her thesis on on the role of Salvadoran elites during the period of annexation to Mexico (1821-1823) was published as a monograph in 2000 by CONCULTURA. María Eugenia López has also received archival training, and from 1998 to 2005 she was Director of the National Archives of El Salvador. She is the author of numerous articles on Salvadoran history, particularly the colonial and early Independence periods; she has written as well on oral histories and archives in her country. She is currently a doctoral candidate in the School of Social Sciences at Colegio de Michoacán in Mexico working on a dissertation on Pueblos de indios, de ladinos y mulatos en una época de transición (1765-1830).

Mobilizing at the Margins: Citizenship, Identity, and Democracy

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Tulane University's Latin American Graduate Organization invites your attendance at the 2015 Graduate Conference where you can meet graduate scholars, faculty, and community leaders interested in Latin America, explore the city, and experience the unique Mardi Gras season in New Orleans!

This year's conference encourages participants to engage with historical and emerging confrontations and reconfigurations of national identification, expressions of individual or communal identity, performances of citizenship, and re-imaginings of democracy within the context of Latin America. Latin America and the Caribbean encompass vast cultural, linguistic, and geographic diversity, making the region a subject of prolific scholarly study across disciplines. Within this complexity, conceptualizations of citizenship, identity, and democracy are constantly being negotiated, contested, and reframed in a multitude of contexts. These various encounters highlight the ways in which individuals interact with their communities, how communities define themselves within and/or beyond the framework of national borders, and how power and politics play out in an increasingly interconnected and decentralized global community.

Our keynote speaker this year will be Dr. Lara Putnam. Lara Putnam is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research has explored labor migration; state racism; and the ways kinship, gender, and sexuality both shape and are shaped by large-scale political and economic shifts. Publications include Radical Moves: Caribbean Migrants and the Politics of Race in the Jazz Age (UNC Press, 2013), The Company They Kept: Migrants and the Politics of Gender in Caribbean Costa Rica, 1870-1960 (UNC Press, 2002), and recent articles in Modernism/Modernities, International Labor and Working-Class History, the Journal of British Studies, and Small Axe. Work in progress uses examples from the history of Venezuela, Trinidad, and Grenada to explore methodological and theoretical dilemmas within history's transnational and digital "turns."

Photographic Exhibit: "Mexico, World Heritage Cities"

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to present the photographic exhibit “Mexico, World Heritage Cities” from January 22 to February 15, 2015. An opening reception will be held on January 22nd at 6 PM.

To date 721 sites worldwide have been listed as World Heritage sites including 167 cities. Of these cities, 10 of them are located in Mexico. The cities were chosen due to their historic, architectural, and urban importance. They include Campeche, Guanajuato, Morelia, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro, San Miguel, Zacatecas, and Mexico City.