Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

The concentration system serves to focus the coursework of Latin American Studies majors and minors in one of the interdisciplinary themes that are the foundation of the Latin American Studies programs at Tulane. Working with the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs students assign the most appropriate concentration to their individual course of study. Seniors submit a formal description of their major including their concentration and core coursework in the Latin American Studies capstone class LAST 4000. The eight concentrations are:

  • Creativity
  • Encounter
  • Exchange
  • Identity
  • Land
  • Nation
  • People
  • Welfare

Sample Courses

Note that these lists are not comprehensive and do not account for all of the courses offered in each department nor those that might be offered as special topics in the departments or Latin American Studies. Courses taken abroad and on Tulane summer programs can also count toward the concentrations.


  • SPAN 4110: Latin American Literature
  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 6960: Ind. & Peasant Movements
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cult of the World
  • DANC 1920: Brazilian Dance: Samba
  • COMM 4190: Latin American Film


  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • INDV 4100: Info Tech and International Devt
  • ARHS 6730: Seminar in Maya Manuscripts


  • MKTG 4650: Global Marketing
  • ECON 3590: Economic Devt of Latin America
  • HISL 6850: US-Latin American Relations
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • SPAN 6220: Colonial Latin American Literature
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs


  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 3950: Performing the Caribbean
  • COMM 4810: Media and Democracy in Latin America
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Performing Arts
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World
  • ANTH 6060: South American Indians


  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • INDV 6100: Environment and Development
  • SPAN 4510: Hispanic Cities
  • HISE 6330: Imperial Spain: 1469-1659
  • HTEL 4250: Cult in the Public Sphere


  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Perf. Arts
  • HISL 3960: Andean Rebellions
  • HISL 3950: Inventing Argentina
  • POLC 3410: Politics and Nationalism
  • PORT 6160: Afro-Brazil


  • SPAN 6850: Women Authors of Latin America
  • SOCI 2490: Latin American Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • ANTH 6830: Aztec and Maya Literature
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World


  • SOCI 2490: Latin Am Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • *INHL 6830: Intl Health Policy
  • HISL 3780: Women in Latin Am History
  • POLS 3010: Poverty and Development
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs

*non LAS course; see the college SPC restrictions




All Events

Upcoming Events

Deconstructing Día de los Muertos in the Classroom

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art are once again sponsoring a K-12 teacher workshop to celebrate Day of the Dead!

The workshop will focus on how to provide students with information about Day of the Dead, Day of the Dead traditions, and celebrating Day of the Dead in the classroom. The workshop will involve hands-on activities, including activities which will translate into the classroom!

All participants will receive light refreshments, 2 free tickets to Ogden After Hours, teaching materials and CEUs. Workshop will focus on the altar exhibit at the Ogden throughout October.

Check out the workshop website to access the schedule or download a PDF here.

Online Registration is now closed
Onsite registration will occur by cash or check ONLY

Deborah Lawrence Lecture: Tropical Forests and Climate Change

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“Tropical Forests and Climate Change”. Deborah Lawrence , Ph.D., is a Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia.

Please join us for a reception afterwards, in Woodward Way.

For more information please contact Jordan Karubian, Associate Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, or 865.5549.

Repression and Street Protests: Behavioral Underpinnings of Backlash Movements

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The Tulane University Political Science department presents a talk entitled “Repression and Street Protests: Behavioral Underpinnings of Backlash Movements” by Susan Stokes, the John S. Saden Professor of Political Science at Yale University and Director of the Yale Program on Democracy.

Dr. Stokes research interests include democratic theory and how democracy functions in developing societies; distributive politics; and comparative political behavior. Her co-authored book, Brokers, Voters, and Clientelism (Cambridge, 2013) won best-book prizes from the Comparative Politics (Luebbert Prize) and Comparative Democratization sections of APSA. Among her earlier books, Mandates and Democracy: Neoliberalism by Surprise in Latin America (Cambridge, 2001), received prizes from the APSA Comparative Democratization section and from the Society for Comparative Research. Her articles have appeared in journals such as the American Political Science Review, World Politics, and the Latin American Research Review.

Sponsored by the Political Science department and the CIPR (Center for Inter-American Policy and Research.

For more information please contact Virginia Oliveros (

MARI Brown Bag: Evan Parker "The Middle Preclassic of the Puuc Maya: Preliminary Excavations at Paso del Macho, Yucatan, Mexico"

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MARI is pleased to present the fifth brown bag of the 2015-2016 year. Evan Parker, a Graduate Student in the Department of Anthropology, will present a talk about his recent research on the Preclassic Maya of Yucatan, Mexico entitled “The Middle Preclassic of the Puuc Maya: Preliminary Excavations at Paso del Macho, Yucatan, Mexico.”

M.A.R.I.'s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto ( for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Workshop: Applying for Grants and Fellowships

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This workshop targets SLA graduate students who are new to grant writing and submission. The workshop will provide tips on searching for funding opportunities and writing an award winning proposal. Grant writing is a significant intellectual activity that is in high demand in many academic fields, economic sectors, and firms and organizations. For academics, grant writing not only raises one’s research visibility but can increase opportunities for writing and national and international presentations. For non-academics, grant writing can open doors to consulting, collaborative research, and entrepreneurial opportunities in the private sector and nonprofit world.

Kevin Gotham will discuss the basic elements and strategies of submitting proposals to the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Social Science Research Council (SSRC), and other federal agencies. He will describe the process and criteria by which federal funders like the NSF and the NEH review proposals, proposal development strategies for individual investigators, the qualities and merits of an award-winning proposal, and federal funding opportunities for researchers. Kevin is a former NSF program director, occasional NSF panelist and reviewer, and a current NSF awardee.

Chris Rodning will discuss why applying for grants is important for graduate students and how grant writing can enhance student career prospects. He will describe the strategies students can use to develop proposals, the importance of working with faculty mentors in preparing proposals, and various skills students can develop to score funding for their research. He will also provide recommendations for how students can seek out and apply for diverse sources of funding, including internal and external sources. Chris has experience reviewing grant proposals for National Geographic Society (NGS), National Science Foundation (NSF), and the American Philosophical Society. He has also been a co-P.I. on NSF and NGS grants; and a P.I. for a Board of Regents Grant.

The workshop will also include short presentations from Katherine Johnston and Patrick Rafail, assistant professors in sociology. Katie and Patrick are past winners of NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant (DDIG) awards. Patrick is a current NSF awardee. They both have much experience as grant writers and will speak about the grant review and evaluation process for graduate student proposals and offer advice and suggestions for developing an award-winning proposal.

The workshop is targeted toward all graduate students in SLA interested in pursuing external funding to complete their dissertations and enhance their professional skills. The format will be interactive, allowing for audience questions and participation. Please RSVP to Kevin Gotham Please also submit a few sentences describing your research interests or an abstract of your dissertation.

Bate Papo! Practice Your Portuguese

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Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian Treats.