Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

The concentration system serves to focus the coursework of Latin American Studies majors and minors in one of the interdisciplinary themes that are the foundation of the Latin American Studies programs at Tulane. Working with the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs students assign the most appropriate concentration to their individual course of study. Seniors submit a formal description of their major including their concentration and core coursework in the Latin American Studies capstone class LAST 4000. The eight concentrations are:

  • Creativity
  • Encounter
  • Exchange
  • Identity
  • Land
  • Nation
  • People
  • Welfare

Sample Courses

Note that these lists are not comprehensive and do not account for all of the courses offered in each department nor those that might be offered as special topics in the departments or Latin American Studies. Courses taken abroad and on Tulane summer programs can also count toward the concentrations.

Creativity:

  • SPAN 4110: Latin American Literature
  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 6960: Ind. & Peasant Movements
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cult of the World
  • DANC 1920: Brazilian Dance: Samba
  • COMM 4190: Latin American Film

Encounter:

  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • INDV 4100: Info Tech and International Devt
  • ARHS 6730: Seminar in Maya Manuscripts

Exchange:

  • MKTG 4650: Global Marketing
  • ECON 3590: Economic Devt of Latin America
  • HISL 6850: US-Latin American Relations
  • SOCI 6950: Sociology of Migration
  • SPAN 6220: Colonial Latin American Literature
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs

Identity:

  • ARHS 3860: Arts of the African Diaspora
  • LAST 3950: Performing the Caribbean
  • COMM 4810: Media and Democracy in Latin America
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Performing Arts
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World
  • ANTH 6060: South American Indians

Land:

  • ANTH 3700: Ecological Anthropology
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs
  • INDV 6100: Environment and Development
  • SPAN 4510: Hispanic Cities
  • HISE 6330: Imperial Spain: 1469-1659
  • HTEL 4250: Cult in the Public Sphere

Nation:

  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • LAST 6950: Nat’l Sentiment and the Perf. Arts
  • HISL 3960: Andean Rebellions
  • HISL 3950: Inventing Argentina
  • POLC 3410: Politics and Nationalism
  • PORT 6160: Afro-Brazil

Peoples:

  • SPAN 6850: Women Authors of Latin America
  • SOCI 2490: Latin American Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • POLC 3350: Central American Governments
  • ANTH 6830: Aztec and Maya Literature
  • MUSC 3300: Music Cultures of the World

Welfare:

  • SOCI 2490: Latin Am Social Structures
  • ECON3580: Labor and Pop of Latin America
  • *INHL 6830: Intl Health Policy
  • HISL 3780: Women in Latin Am History
  • POLS 3010: Poverty and Development
  • EEOB 3180: Plants and Human Affairs

*non LAS course; see the college SPC restrictions

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Upcoming Events

Art Exhibit "Dualities"

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans presents the art exhibition "DUALITIES " by Mexican artist Juan Pablo Hurtado from May 21st to June 15th, 2015. An opening reception will be held on May 28th at 6:00 pm.

Heroes of Brazil Story Hour and Capoeira Demonstration

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The Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Pebbles Center Westbank, based at the Algiers Regional Library, are sponsoring a story time and Capoeira Demonstration on June 17th. The NOPL summer reading program theme is heroes, so the storytime will discuss heroes of Brazil.

The program is free and open to the public. Please join us to celebrate heroes and learn about Capoeira!

Explore Brazil in the K-12 Classroom: Summer 2015 Teacher Institute

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The Latin American Resource Center, the Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University, and the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Institute and the Portuguese Flagship Program at the University of Georgia are presenting a K-12 teacher workshop exploring Brazil in the classroom. The workshop will take place on the Tulane University Uptown Campus.

K-12 educators of any discipline and grade-level are welcome to apply to attend this 5 day institute. The focus of the institute is on the language, culture, and performance of Brazil. The workshop will include exposure to the Portuguese language, discussions with scholars of Brazilian culture and performance, viewings of Brazilian films, and performances by Brazilian groups. Throughout the week, educators will work to develop interdisciplinary curricula, which they can bring back to their schools to teach and share with colleagues. There is a specialized track to this institute in order to better support participants. There is a Portuguese Language track which consists of intensive morning language sessions for those interested in receiving a crash course in basic Portuguese. This track is open to participants with Spanish language background and little to no Portuguese training. While this track is meeting every morning, sessions for those interested in cultures of Brazil will take place. Please make sure to identify if you would like to be in the language track in your application form at the bottom of this page.

Registration Information
Participants have the option of registering under three affordable rates:

  • Basic Registration – $50 [includes all materials, parking permit for 5 days, internet access and registration to entire program with no lodging or meals.]
  • Full Registration – $250 [includes all above plus includes lodging (with linens) in a Tulane residence hall 4 nights, with 2 meals a day, and access to Tulane Reilly Fitness Center.]
  • Deluxe Registration – $300 [includes everything above plus guarantees a single room in the residence hall.]

The 2015 Summer K-12 Teacher Institute, Somos Nós: Teaching Afro-Brazilian Identity is a 20-hour program designed for K-12 teachers, librarians, or administrative staff. K-12 educators will benefit from this timely, interactive program on one of the world's strongest and most influential economies in the world, Brazil. The program is sponsored by Tulane University, the University of Georgia, and Vanderbilt University through a U.S. Department of Education Title VI National Resource Center grant.

A detailed schedule will be posted shortly. For more information visit the institute webpage

For more information, please contact Denise Woltering Vargas at 504-862-3143 or dwolteri@tulane.edu

Summer K-12 Teacher Institute in Cuba

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Teaching Cuban Culture and Society: A Summer K-12 Teacher Institute in Cuba
Havana, Cuba | June 20 – July 4, 2015

The Application Deadline has passed.

The Stone Center for Latin American Studies is offering a unique summer study abroad program for K-12 teachers in Havana, Cuba in 2015. This two-week program provides the unique opportunity to work on developing lesson plans while exploring the sights and sounds of a nation and people that remain obscured behind political rhetoric and misinformation. Recent economic changes on the island have provoked a series of social and cultural transformations that have left Cubans and the entire world wondering what could be next for the island and the Revolution. Don't miss the chance to witness some of these challenges and triumphs firsthand and get the opportunity to bring your experience back to your students in the classroom.

PLEASE VIEW THE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY.

ITINERARY – 15 DAYS

  • Day 1 – U.S./HAVANA, CUBA
    Depart from Tampa, FL, Upon arrival, enjoy dinner and a welcome reception followed by an informal walk and people watching on the Malecón.
  • Day 2 – HAVANA
    Havana Vieja Tour with local preservation experts to discuss in depth the history of local landmarks, historical preservation efforts, and future plans. Visit "Arte Corte" – a barber shop and hair-dressing school in the Santo Angel neighborhood developed to promote skills in the community and support the local economy – and meet with local community leaders., students and elderly folks at the community center Visit the Callejón de Hamel for rumba music and meet with Centro Habana residents. Presentation on AfroCuban dance with musical expert Cari Diez; opportunity to interact with the musicians and staff.
  • Day 3 – HAVANA
    Lecture with Professor Alfredo Prieto on "Cuba Since the Special Period." Curriculum development workshop. Visit the Cuba Council of Churches to meet local people and participate in a seminar about the organization's work in the areas of youth, agriculture, social welfare, and international communications.
  • Day 4 – HAVANA
    Walking tour of Calle Obispo in the morning with Professor Rafael Hernández. Meet the instructors and students of La Colmenita, an after-school program that uses song and dance performance as a social development tool.
  • Day 5 – HAVANA
    Presentation by Professor Isabel Rigol on "Current Challenges Facing Havana's Effort to Preserve its Architecture and Heritage." Visit to the Escuelas Nacional de Arte and meet with students and faculty. Evening walk and visit to the Cañonazo at the Morro.
  • Day 6 – VINALES
    Day trip to the UNESCO World Heritage site, Viñales for landscape and village exploration. Explore the mountainous magotes and visit and meet local tobacco farmers working in their fields and storehouses. At the Casa del Veguero we'll have an introduction to tobacco farming and tobacco production. Visit with locals in the town of Viñales; lunch will be a community event shared with local families, followed by a visit to a children's art center.
  • Day 7 – ALAMAR
    Visit to an Organipónico (urban agrarian farm) in Alamar to explore sustainable farming in Cuba and learn about Cuban cuisine from local gardeners and Noel Pina, the manager of the garden. After lunch explore the community project Muraleando, where local artists have been changing a downtrodden neighborhood into a living work of art.
  • Day 8 – HAVANA/JAIMANITAS
    Visit to Cementerio Colón and interact with the dozens of pilgrims who line up daily at the tomb of Amelia Goyri, said to grant miracles. Continue on to the Plaza de la Revolución. Lunch and afternoon visit to workshop of ceramic artist, José Fuster, who has turned his neighborhood into a unique, whimsical work of public art. Curriculum development in the evening.
  • Day 9 – SANTA CLARA, TRINIDAD
    Travel to Trinidad via Santa Clara, a town founded by 175 people on July 15, 1689. It is the site of the last battle in the Cuban Revolution in 1958. Visit to the Che Mausoleum in Santa Clara. Also visit the historic sugar plantation of Manaca Iznaga before arriving in Trinidad.
  • Day 10 – TRINIDAD
    Explore this UNESCO World Heritage site, founded on December 23, 1514 by Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar. Trinidad was a central piece of Cuba's sugar-based economy. Guided city tour with the city historian. Visit the Trinidad library to learn about the importance of libraries and debate questions of intellectual freedom with the staff. Meet with local entrepreneur David Alamar, owner of a private paladar (Davimart) to discuss cuentaproprismo in Cuba.
  • Day 11 – CIENFUEGOS
    We will head to Cienfuegos, a town known for its architectural beauty which reveals its French colonial roots. Visit the Beny More School of Art that trains students in the visual and musical arts and is one of the top ten middle-level art schools in Cuba.
  • Day 12 – HAVANA
    We will hear from children's book author Olga Marta Pérez about the children's/ youth Literacy Scene in Cuba today. In the afternoon, we will visit the Cuban Collection of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes accompanied by a curator.
  • Day 13 – PLAYA GIRON (Site of Bay of Pigs), Ciénega de Zapata, Playa Larga
    Day excursion to the historic site of the Bay of Pigs, one of the landing sites for the 1961 US-backed invasion. Visit the Finca Fiesta Campesina farm, the Playa Girón museum, the Parque Ciénaga de Zapata, the Laguna del Tesoro, and the Taino Indian village.
  • Day 14 – HAVANA
    Wrap-up curriculum workshop followed by a free afternoon ending in a celebratory dinner.
  • Day 15 – HAVANA/U.S.
    Morning departure for the U.S.

For questions, contact Denise Woltering Vargas at 504.862.3143, or at crcrts@tulane.edu. Visit the Summer 2015 Institute webpage.

REPAL Second Annual Conference

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The second annual meeting of REPAL (Red para el Estudio de la Economía Política de América Latina) will be held July 7-8, 2015 in Montevideo, Uruguay, hosted by the The Department of Social and Political Sciences at the Universidad Católica del Uruguay (UCU, Montevideo).

The conference discusses important puzzles and problems, both theoretical and practical, in the political economy of Latin America. Papers, and presentations are presented in English, Spanish, or Portuguese.

The conference is sponsored by CIPR. For more information visit the REPAL website.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas Exhibit

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MEXICO IN NEW ORLEANS: A Tale of Two Americas
May 5 through August 30, 2015
Opening reception on Cinco de Mayo (Tuesday, May 5)

From May 5 through August 30, 2015, the LSU Museum of Art in Baton Rouge, LA will present Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas. The exhibition explores the artistic exchange between Louisiana and Mexico from the 1920s through 1950s, a period of vibrant cultural and artistic connections between the two regions. The exhibition tells the story of a decades-long dialogue between Mexican and Louisianan artists that critically shaped the art of both countries, resulting in artistic affinities that continue to connect Louisiana and Mexico today.

During the 1920s and 1930s, a series of celebrated Mexican art exhibitions brought the art and culture of modern Mexico to Louisiana. By 1928, the New Orleans Times-Picayune had proclaimed Mexican artist Diego Rivera "the greatest painter on the North American continent," and encouraged Louisiana artists to take counsel from modern Mexican art. In 1930, a critic for the Times-Picayune urged Louisiana artists to turn their gaze from the art of Europe and towards the art of Mexico, writing that Mexican art was "more nearly related to us emotionally" than European art.

By the late 1920s, Louisianan artists like William Spratling, Caroline Durieux, Alberta Kinsey, and Conrad A. Albrizio began travelling to Mexico to learn from Mexican artists like Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Ruffino Tamayo, and Carlos Orozco Romero. These artists became friends, colleagues, and frequent collaborators, organizing exhibitions in both Mexico City and New Orleans that celebrated their artistic alliance. Diego Rivera's portrait of Louisiana printmaker Caroline Durieux, for example, was shown at least three times in exhibitions at the Belles Arts in Mexico City, and also appeared at the New Orleans Arts and Crafts Club, paired with the work of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. By the early 1930s, the strength of this artistic interaction
between Mexico and Louisiana caused a writer for The New Orleanian to characterize Louisianan art as having a "distinct Mexican tinge." By 1933, the Times-Picayune cited an undeniably "strong Mexican trend" in Louisiana art.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas is the first major museum exhibition to explore this captivating international cultural exchange. features more than 80 works by both Mexican and Louisianan artists who were part of this captivating international cultural exchange and will be accompanied by a richly illustrated bilingual exhibition catalogue designed by the LSU School of Art. The exhibition features artwork drawn from the LSU Museum of Art's collection of works by Diego Rivera and Caroline Durieux, as well as artworks by other prominent artists like David Alfaro Siqueiros, Boyd Cruise, and Elizabeth Catlett borrowed from public and private collections including the Historic New Orleans Collection and the Latin American Library at Tulane University. In the exhibition, paintings, watercolors, drawings and prints by these artists will be supplemented with sculpture, furniture, decorative arts, and ephemera such as pamphlets and postcards which help tell the story of Mexico in New Orleans-and New Orleans in Mexico.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas is curated by Dr. Katie A. Pfohl, and organized by the LSU Museum of Art.