Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Course Requirements for Majors & Minors

The B.A. in Latin American Studies requires a minimum of 30 credit hours in 10 Latin American content courses. Under the guidance of consulting faculty and the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs, students design their own major according to their individual strengths, objectives and interests. Courses are selected from the various departments offering classes in the field as well as from Latin American Studies. Latin American Studies 1010, 1020, and 4000 are required courses. One course at the 1000 level may count toward the major, although a 1000 level class is not required. HISL 1710 History of Latin America is strongly recommended, although not required. Six of the remaining seven Latin American content electives must be at the 2000-level or higher. Finally, three must be at the 6000-level. Students who take at least 20 college credits in 7 courses with Latin American content over two semesters while on academic programs in Latin America approved by Tulane are required to take only two courses at the 6000-level. This can be a full year abroad or a semester and a SCLAS summer program. All 6000-level coursework for the major must be taken in residence at Tulane University; courses taken abroad will not count toward this requirement. Five elective courses must concentrate on one of the themes that are the foundation of the interdisciplinary Latin American Studies program at Tulane: Creativity, Encounter, Exchange, Identity, Land, Nation, Peoples, Welfare. Students will work closely with the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs to construct a coherent concentration of coursework, as Latin American content electives include a wide variety taught in several disciplines. Some sample groupings are provided under Concentration Fields.

Latin American Studies majors must demonstrate linguistic competency in either Spanish or Portuguese. This can be done in one of three ways:

  • complete with a passing grade at least one course at the 4000-level or higher in Spanish or Portuguese
  • complete with passing grades at least one semester of coursework in Spanish or Portuguese on a study abroad program
  • place into the 600-level on the language test administered by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Note that, with the exception of SPAN 3130, language classes below the 400-level do not count as electives for the Latin American Studies major or minor programs.

A minor in Latin American Studies consists of 15 credit hours in 5 courses. Required courses include one of the two introductory courses on Latin America: LAST 1010 or LAST 1020, and four electives, three of which must be at the 2000 level or higher, and one of which must be at the 6000 level. All 6000-level coursework for the minor must be taken in residency at Tulane; courses taken abroad do not count toward this requirement. There is no language requirement for Latin American Studies minors.

Because Latin American content courses are offered in most disciplines, the Stone Center generates and maintains a list of classes that count towards the major and minor prior to the start of each semester. Students should be aware that many Latin American content courses do not have an LAST call number. The current list of courses for each semester is available in the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and on the Registrar’s website under Courses Offered in Co-operating Departments. Note that although we keep these listings as current as possible, courses fulfill Latin American Studies criteria may not appear on the list. Please contact the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs if you are interested in taking a course for Latin American Studies credit that does not appear in our listings and we will contact the instructor regarding course content.

Both majors and minors in Latin American Studies are strongly encouraged to study in Latin America both for the experience and also because much of the coursework taken abroad counts toward the Latin American Studies programs. Summer abroad programs have taken place in Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru; semester abroad or Junior Year Abroad programs are available in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico and Uruguay. Some courses offered in Tulane’s program in Spain also count toward Latin American Studies. For current information on study abroad opportunities, please visit Stone Center’s International Programs page.

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Upcoming Events

Summer Bilingual Reading Series at the Pebbles Center

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SECOND SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

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La hora del Cuento: 'Twas Nochebuena

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Join the Pebbles Center at the Children’s Resource Center branch of the New Orleans Public Library for bilingual story time. We will be reading ‘Twas Nochebuena and celebrating Christmas in the summer! _’Twas Nochebuena’ is a 2015 Americas Book Award Commended Title.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas Exhibit

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MEXICO IN NEW ORLEANS: A Tale of Two Americas
May 5 through August 30, 2015
Opening reception on Cinco de Mayo (Tuesday, May 5)

From May 5 through August 30, 2015, the LSU Museum of Art in Baton Rouge, LA will present Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas. The exhibition explores the artistic exchange between Louisiana and Mexico from the 1920s through 1950s, a period of vibrant cultural and artistic connections between the two regions. The exhibition tells the story of a decades-long dialogue between Mexican and Louisianan artists that critically shaped the art of both countries, resulting in artistic affinities that continue to connect Louisiana and Mexico today.

During the 1920s and 1930s, a series of celebrated Mexican art exhibitions brought the art and culture of modern Mexico to Louisiana. By 1928, the New Orleans Times-Picayune had proclaimed Mexican artist Diego Rivera "the greatest painter on the North American continent," and encouraged Louisiana artists to take counsel from modern Mexican art. In 1930, a critic for the Times-Picayune urged Louisiana artists to turn their gaze from the art of Europe and towards the art of Mexico, writing that Mexican art was "more nearly related to us emotionally" than European art.

By the late 1920s, Louisianan artists like William Spratling, Caroline Durieux, Alberta Kinsey, and Conrad A. Albrizio began travelling to Mexico to learn from Mexican artists like Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Ruffino Tamayo, and Carlos Orozco Romero. These artists became friends, colleagues, and frequent collaborators, organizing exhibitions in both Mexico City and New Orleans that celebrated their artistic alliance. Diego Rivera's portrait of Louisiana printmaker Caroline Durieux, for example, was shown at least three times in exhibitions at the Belles Arts in Mexico City, and also appeared at the New Orleans Arts and Crafts Club, paired with the work of Mexican painter Frida Kahlo. By the early 1930s, the strength of this artistic interaction
between Mexico and Louisiana caused a writer for The New Orleanian to characterize Louisianan art as having a "distinct Mexican tinge." By 1933, the Times-Picayune cited an undeniably "strong Mexican trend" in Louisiana art.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas is the first major museum exhibition to explore this captivating international cultural exchange. features more than 80 works by both Mexican and Louisianan artists who were part of this captivating international cultural exchange and will be accompanied by a richly illustrated bilingual exhibition catalogue designed by the LSU School of Art. The exhibition features artwork drawn from the LSU Museum of Art's collection of works by Diego Rivera and Caroline Durieux, as well as artworks by other prominent artists like David Alfaro Siqueiros, Boyd Cruise, and Elizabeth Catlett borrowed from public and private collections including the Historic New Orleans Collection and the Latin American Library at Tulane University. In the exhibition, paintings, watercolors, drawings and prints by these artists will be supplemented with sculpture, furniture, decorative arts, and ephemera such as pamphlets and postcards which help tell the story of Mexico in New Orleans-and New Orleans in Mexico.

Mexico in New Orleans: A Tale of Two Americas is curated by Dr. Katie A. Pfohl, and organized by the LSU Museum of Art.

Call for Papers: Tropical Exposures Conference

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Tropical Exposures: Photography, Film, and Visual Culture in a Caribbean Frame
March 10-12, 2016
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA

The 2016 Tropical Exposures conference is now accepting abstracts through September 15, 2015. Click here to view or download the official Call for Papers.

Tropical Exposures welcomes proposals for papers that address any facet of Caribbean visual representation in photography, film, art, popular culture, and other media, as well as the interaction of word and image more generally. Scholars are also encouraged to present proposals that consider social and cultural shifts toward the increasing intermediality of representation in the Caribbean frame.

Papers may focus on one terrain, image-maker, or form of media, or employ comparative strategies. Papers may be in English, Spanish, French or Portuguese, though English is preferred. We anticipate creating an edited volume of expanded essays around the notion of Tropical Exposures, co-edited by Ana López and Marilyn Miller. We encourage participants to prepare abstracts and presentations with an eye to inclusion in a print publication. Papers might address some of the following tropics or questions in their myriad Caribbean contexts:

-Conditions of image production in the torrid zones
-Documentary film and the aims of full exposure
-Still life and the notion of static representation
-Visual literacy and lens-based scholarship
-Image and intellectual property
-Snapshots, clips, collages and other image fragments
-Icons of visual culture from Korda’s Che to Cabrera Infante’s Códac
-Ruins as sites of deterioration and inspiration
-Visual representation, race and post-race
-Caribbean images as ephemera
-Realisms, surrealisms, hyperrealisms
-Museums, biennales, and other sites of collective visual consumption
-Code-switching between media
-Virtual and interactive visual systems
-Word and Image studies in and on the Caribbean
-Facades
-Censorship and the Image
-Moving pictures and sentiment
-Patronage, connoisseurship, and institutional support
-Captions
-Image saturation and contamination
-Interiority and exteriority
-Fair use of the Caribbean image
-Tourism and other circuitous systems
-New languages and theories of visual technique and critique

Please send a proposal and 250-word abstract by September 15, 2015 to <ccsi@tulane.edu>, including the abstract as an attachment to the email. Please include the title of your paper, your name (and the names of any co-presenters), institutional affiliation, mailing address, phone number, and email address. We welcome pre-constituted panels. If submitting a panel for consideration, please include a top sheet with panel title, participant names and a brief abstract of the panel topic in addition to the individual paper proposals.

Notification of acceptance to the conference will be made by October 1, 2015.

For updated information on the conference, location and arrangements, visit the Tropical Exposures page on the Cuban & Caribbean Studies website.

Area Studies & Outreach in the Social Studies Classroom

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Area Studies & Outreach in the Social Studies Classroom
November 10-11, 2015

A working meeting sponsored by Tulane University’s Stone Center for Latin American Studies and the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs. This meeting will highlight important themes of outreach across area studies while producing valuable insight into best strategies for engaging with the K-12 Social Studies community. The meeting will explore best practices and strategies for assessment, resource access, and travel and collaboration.

Call for Papers
Read the Call for Papers for more information on submitting abstracts. Presentation abstracts due June 19, 2015

Papers should address one of the following themes:

Evaluation and Assessment

  • Assessment of Learning
  • Project Evaluation

Innovative Resource Design and Access
  • Distance Learning
  • New Technology

Telling the Story
  • Promotional Strategies
  • Outreach to K-16 Communities

Travel & Outreach
  • Collaborative Partnerships Abroad
  • Effective Professional Development Abroad

Strategic Partnerships
  • MSIs/Community Colleges
  • Teacher Education Programs

The meeting will take place before the annual National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) conference in New Orleans, LA November 13-15, 2015. Participants are encouraged to attend the working meeting and stay for the conference afterwards.

This meeting is funded through a Title VI U.S. Department of Education grant, the Consortium of Latin American Studies Programs, and Tulane University's Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Sponsors also include The University of Maine Canadian-American Center, The University of Texas at Austin Center for Middle Eastern Studies, The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, The University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for South Asia, and the Boston University Africa Studies Center.

Travel Funding Opportunity
Funding for travel may be provided to those whose presentations are accepted. Applications for funding can be made by filling out this form and returning it to LARC by email (crcrts@tulane.edu), fax (504.865.6719) or mail (Stone Center for Latin American Studies 100 Jones Hall New Orleans, LA 70118).

For more information, please contact Denise Woltering at 504-862-3143 or dwolteri@tulane.edu

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Tropical Exposures: Photography, Film, and Visual Culture in a Caribbean Frame

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Tropical Exposures: Photography, Film, and Visual Culture in a Caribbean Frame
March 10-12, 2016
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA

We offer our conference as a forum in which to peruse and absorb the visual turn in contemporary inquiry from the unique vantage points of the Caribbean, circum-Caribbean and Caribbean diasporas. We conceive the tropical exposure as a frame for representing the region’s strengths and vulnerabilities and for questioning the interaction of Antillean sensibilities with a plethora of images and mediascapes. Our invited keynote speakers include photographer Virginia Beahan and artist Francisco Crespo, whose work appears on this page.

Tropical Exposures welcomes proposals for papers that address any facet of Caribbean visual representation in photography, film, art, popular culture, and other media, as well as the interaction of word and image more generally. Scholars are also encouraged to present proposals that consider social and cultural shifts toward the increasing intermediality of representation in the Caribbean frame.

Conference Updates:
Tropical Exposures is now accepting proposals. Please see the Call for Papers page for more information. Proposals are due by September 15, 2015.