Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Academic Programs

Course Requirements for Majors & Minors

The B.A. in Latin American Studies requires a minimum of 30 credit hours in 10 Latin American content courses. Under the guidance of consulting faculty and the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs, students design their own major according to their individual strengths, objectives and interests. Courses are selected from the various departments offering classes in the field as well as from Latin American Studies. Latin American Studies 1010, 1020, and 4000 are required courses. One course at the 1000 level may count toward the major, although a 1000 level class is not required. HISL 1710 History of Latin America is strongly recommended, although not required. Six of the remaining seven Latin American content electives must be at the 2000-level or higher. Finally, three must be at the 6000-level. Students who take at least 20 college credits in 7 courses with Latin American content over two semesters while on academic programs in Latin America approved by Tulane are required to take only two courses at the 6000-level. This can be a full year abroad or a semester and a SCLAS summer program. All 6000-level coursework for the major must be taken in residence at Tulane University; courses taken abroad will not count toward this requirement. Five elective courses must concentrate on one of the themes that are the foundation of the interdisciplinary Latin American Studies program at Tulane: Creativity, Encounter, Exchange, Identity, Land, Nation, Peoples, Welfare. Students will work closely with the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs to construct a coherent concentration of coursework, as Latin American content electives include a wide variety taught in several disciplines. Some sample groupings are provided under Concentration Fields.

Latin American Studies majors must demonstrate linguistic competency in either Spanish or Portuguese. This can be done in one of three ways:

  • complete with a passing grade at least one course at the 4000-level or higher in Spanish or Portuguese
  • complete with passing grades at least one semester of coursework in Spanish or Portuguese on a study abroad program
  • place into the 600-level on the language test administered by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Note that, with the exception of SPAN 3130, language classes below the 400-level do not count as electives for the Latin American Studies major or minor programs.

A minor in Latin American Studies consists of 15 credit hours in 5 courses. Required courses include one of the two introductory courses on Latin America: LAST 1010 or LAST 1020, and four electives, three of which must be at the 2000 level or higher, and one of which must be at the 6000 level. All 6000-level coursework for the minor must be taken in residency at Tulane; courses taken abroad do not count toward this requirement. There is no language requirement for Latin American Studies minors.

Because Latin American content courses are offered in most disciplines, the Stone Center generates and maintains a list of classes that count towards the major and minor prior to the start of each semester. Students should be aware that many Latin American content courses do not have an LAST call number. The current list of courses for each semester is available in the Stone Center for Latin American Studies and on the Registrar’s website under Courses Offered in Co-operating Departments. Note that although we keep these listings as current as possible, courses fulfill Latin American Studies criteria may not appear on the list. Please contact the Stone Center’s Director of Undergraduate Affairs if you are interested in taking a course for Latin American Studies credit that does not appear in our listings and we will contact the instructor regarding course content.

Both majors and minors in Latin American Studies are strongly encouraged to study in Latin America both for the experience and also because much of the coursework taken abroad counts toward the Latin American Studies programs. Summer abroad programs have taken place in Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Mexico and Peru; semester abroad or Junior Year Abroad programs are available in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico and Uruguay. Some courses offered in Tulane’s program in Spain also count toward Latin American Studies. For current information on study abroad opportunities, please visit Stone Center’s International Programs page.

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Upcoming Events

Consulate of Mexico Presents "Los Demonios de mi Tierra" Photo Exhibit

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans presents the photographic exhibition:

Los Demonios de mi Tierra
by Mexican Artist Mauricio Silerio

Opening Reception
July 7th, 2016 at 6:00 PM

Art Gallery of the Mexican Consulate
901 Convention Center Blvd. Ste. 118
New Orleans, LA 70130

Exploring the 2016 US Elections

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The US’s November elections are especially critical. The world’s power structures are undergoing dramatic changes, and so the internal political process of this world leader has even greater global consequences.

Looking beyond just the US’s foreign policy is key to understanding its actions. Over the next few months, the teaching programs at several Costa Rican institutions will focus on the following:

  • An analysis of succession of power within institutional structures.
  • The role of political parties (polarization).
  • The influence of changing demographics.
  • The geographic expression of social change.
  • The effect of the democratic process in the formulation and implementation of the US’s foreign policy towards Latin American in particular.

The University of Costa Rica, through its School of Political Science, and the Centro de Investigación y Estudios Políticos (CIEP), has joined forces with the Tribunal Supremo de Elecciones y su Instituto de Formación y Estudios en Democracia (IFED), as well as with the University of Tulane, through its Center for Inter-American Policy and Research (CIPR), for a series of outreach activities during the second half of 2016. These activities will utilize the resources at these educational and research institutions to promote a better understanding of the electoral process in the US.

The results of this upcoming election will have repercussions for the world, particularly in Latin American and Costa Rica. A broader, deeper understanding of the current situation will be useful for both universities and public policy decision-makers.

Participating institutions are confident that a proper analysis of this political process will lead to improved understanding and cooperation between the two nations.

Schedule of Activities

August

  • Thursday, 8/18: Talk on the United States’ electoral system by Diego Brenes, IFED.

September
  • Thursday, 9/1: Discussion on demographics and electoral geography in the US with Constantino Urcuyo and Jesús Guzmán.
  • Thursday, 9/22: Talk on Politics and Elections: Celeste Lay, Phd. Tulane University.

October
  • Thursday, 10/13: Discussion on elections and external politics: Carlos Murillo, Phd. in government and public policy.
  • Thursday, 10/27: Talk by Jenny Lincoln Fullbright from the US Embassy.

November
  • Monday, 11/10: Round table. Analysis of election results with Constantino Urcuyo, Felipe Alpízar, Nuria Marín, and Fernando Zeledón as moderator.