Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

International Programs

Cuba (Havana) Cuban Culture and Society

Since 1997, Tulane’s Summer in Cuba program has offered undergraduate students a unique opportunity for an in-depth learning experience in our closest Caribbean neighbor. Based in Havana, Cuba’s vibrant capital and the cultural and economic center of the island, the program provides participants with accommodations in the heart of the city – offering many opportunities for language and cultural immersion outside the classroom. Classes are hosted by the University of Havana, an internationally prestigious Cuban academic institution. Course offerings include: Afro-Cuban Heritage: History and Culture, Cuban Culture and Society, Urban Landscape: Imagining Havana, Spanish, and Cuban Literature. With the exception of Spanish language studies and the Cuban Literature course, all classes are taught in English unless otherwise noted and are complemented by readings and field trips. This program is sponsored by the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute of the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Please note that this program has been temporarily discontinued as of June 30, 2004. For more information, please consult the Programs in Cuba page at the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute web site.

Cuba (Havana) International Public Health

This summer program is open to graduate students seeking on-site experience with public health issues in developing countries. The course will expose students to multiple aspects of the Cuban health system. It will take place in the unique social and political environment of Havana, and involve daily lectures by various health authorities in the country, and several visits to important sites relevant to the health system. It will challenge students to critically evaluate current issues in Cuban development that affect its population’s health status. In addition, students will gain an applied understanding of the current methods used to measure social change within Cuba. Contact Prof. Katherine Macintyre (kmacint@tulane.edu) in the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine for more information. Please note that this program has been temporarily discontinued as of June 30, 2004.

Dominican Republic

The Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies are pleased to offer students the opportunity to study in the Dominican Republic during a three-week summer program. Participating students will have a unique opportunity to observe and study the history, culture, social structures, institutions, and landscape (built and natural) of the Dominican Republic in the context of the Caribbean. Guest lectures by local specialists in conjunction with extensive field trips throughout the country will enhance the two courses offered, Dominican Culture and Society in a Caribbean Context and Urban Forms and Vernacular Landscapes in the Caribbean. Classes will be held in different locations throughout the Dominican Republic and students will be housed in hotels throughout the island. Associate Provost Ana López, who is also the director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute, will lead the program. A faculty member of the LAS Communication department, Prof. López’s research focuses on Latin American and Caribbean film and popular culture. The co-director of the program is Prof. Mark Thomas, who teaches historical preservation and landscape architecture in the Tulane School of Architecture. Please note that this program will not be available in summer 2008, but will be offered again in upcoming years.
Peru (Norte Chico Region) Archaeology and Cultural History

Through Tulane’s Archaeological Program in Peru, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies offers students the opportunity to study in the Norte Chico region of Peru, an area that has gained recent fame for its prehistoric complexity and late Chimu occupation. The recent discovery of early evidence of social complexity in the region, dating to approximately 2900 years ago, makes this an ideal time for students to explore this prehistoric culture . El Norte Chico region is located 200 kilometers north of Lima, the nation’s capital, and is famous not only for its early monumental architecture, but also for its impressive Chimu occupation that includes large walled fortresses. As part of this archaeological field school, students will be exposed to the prehistoric Peruvian cultures that once occupied this area and will be taught archaeological field survey methods and analysis techniques. Kit Nelson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Tulane University and a specialist in the late Pre-ceramic and Early Initial Period of Peru, leads the program. Please consult the Summer in Peru website or contact the Stone Center’s Summer Program Coordination Office at the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute (rtsclas@tulane.edu) for more information. Please note that this program will not be available in summer 2008.

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Congreso de Jornaleros: Experiences and Perspectives from Immigrant Workers in New Orleans

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The Congress of Day Laborers, an organization of immigrant workers and families founded by the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, is a leadership pipeline for hundreds of members into public life and social movement participation. A panel of immigrant leaders from Congreso will share how they have formed alliances across the community and influenced elected officials, as well as how students can help build a more tolerant society.

For more information please email Kate Rose (Vice President, BridgeTulane) at krose4@tulane.edu.

This event is sponsored by BridgeTulane, the Payson Graduate Program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Anthropology and the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice.

Newcomb Art Museum to host Archivist Panel for installation EMPIRE

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On Wednesday, April 25, join the Newcomb Art Museum for an incredible panel, moderated by Rebecca Snedeker, with the archivists of the various collections across Tulane as they discuss their responsibilities as cultural curators and the role od archives on campus.

In celebration of the New Orleans Tri-centennial, Newcomb Art Museum has on display an exhibit entitled EMPIRE, an immersive art installation by Los Angeles-based artists Fallen Fruit, from April 13, 2018 to July 7, 2018 on Tulane University’s uptown campus.

In EMPIRE, Fallen Fruit intentionally includes historical records, ephemeral artifacts, artworks and objects culled from various archives across Tulane’s campus and recontextualizes them in the museum. The archives include those from the Amistad Research Center, Hogan Jazz Archive, the Latin American Library, Louisiana Research Collection, Tulane Law Library, Tulane University Archives, Middle American Research Institute, Newcomb Art Museum, Newcomb College Institute, Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection/Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute and Southeastern Architectural Archive.

This panel is free and open to the public.

Featuring

Kara Olidge, Executive Director
Amistad Research Assistant

Alaina Hébert, Associate Curator of Graphics
Hogan Jazz Archive

Leon Miller, Head of the Louisiana Research Collection

Caroline Parris, Collections Manager
Middle American Research Institute

Sierra Polisar, Art Collections Manager & Registrar
Newcomb Art Museum

Chloe Raud, Head of Newcomb Archives and Vorhoff library Special Collections
Newcomb Art Institute

Justin Mann, Collections Manager
Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection
Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute

Kevin Williams, Archivist
Southeastern Architectural Archive

Ann Case, University Archivist
Howard-Tilton Memorial Library Tulane University Archives

Learn more about the installation by visiting the Newcomb Art Museum’s website. The exhibition has also been featured in the Tulane Hullabaloo and Tulane New Wave.

Chantalle Verna to Present Research on U.S. and Haitian Relationships in Post-Occupation Haiti

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Chantalle Verna for a talk on her book Haiti and the Uses of America: Post- U.S. Occupation Promises on April 26, 2018, at 6:00 PM.

In her book, Dr. Verna makes evident that there have been key moments of cooperation that contributed to nation-building in both countries. Dr. Verna emphasizes the importance of examining the post-occupation period: the decades that followed the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and considering how Haiti’s public officials and privileged citizens rationalized nurturing ties with the United States at the very moment when the two nations began negotiating the reinstatement of Haitian sovereignty in 1930. Their efforts, Dr. Verna shows, helped favorable ideas about the United States, once held by a small segment of Haitian society, circulate more widely. In this way, Haitians contributed to and capitalized upon the spread of internationalism in the Americas and the larger world.

Dr. Verna received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently a professor in the History Department in Florida International University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Verna focuses on the culture of foreign relations, specifically concerning Haiti and the United States during the mid-twentieth century.

Co-sponsored by: Department of History, Graduate Studies Student Association, Newcomb College Institute and XUTULAC (the Xavier and Tulane Latin American & Caribbean Studies Partnership).

Fridays at Newcomb to host Sabia McCoy-Torres for talk on the anthropology of dance

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Join us in welcoming Sabia McCoy-Torres who will present on her research in a talk titled, Shifting the Lens from Harm to Pleasure: What We Learn from Women in Dancehall. Sabia McCoy-Torres is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at Tulane University. She has a Ph.D. in social and cultural anthropology from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the English and Spanish speaking African Diaspora, race, gender, sexuality, transnationalism, and popular music and performance. Geographically, her work is based primarily in the United States and Coast Rica. Dr. McCoy-Torres’s work has been published in Transforming Anthropology and Black Music Research Journal.

The lecture includes a free lunch and is open to the public.

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: caipirão

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Bate Papo! Celebrate the end of the semester with a caipirão happy hour at the local watering hole. We’ll meet outside and quench our thirst while cramming for an exam or two or simply procrastinating. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Decoding the Purity of an Icon

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Join us for paintings and installations by Mexican artist Belinda Flores-Shinshillas in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies this March.

The Webster’s dictionary defines purity as “being free from or unmixed with any other matter.” Decoding the Purity of an Icon is a series of 10 oil female portrait paintings on canvas and 2 installations thought by Flores-Shinshillas to convey the message of recording an individual’s appearance and personality, using the tradition of iconography for veneration of purity and spirituality beyond the representation of the feminine subject. These works of art have been approached in a contemporary manner, making these portraits much more than pure representation.