Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz Exhibit at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art

October 1st, 2011 - January 8th, 2011

Location
Ogden Museum of Southern Art
925 Camp Street, New Orleans

Josephine Sacabo’s photographs transfer the viewer into a world of constructed beauty. Built upon a foundation of poetry and literature, her many portfolios are visual manifestations of the written word. Sacabo divides her time between New Orleans and Mexico. Both locales inform her work – culminating in imagery that is as dreamlike, surreal, and romantic as the places that she calls home. On view through Jan. 8, 2012.

1. ÓYEME CON LOS OJOS (HEAR ME WITH YOUR EYES)
[2009-2010, Mexico & New Orleans]

“De este cuerpo eres el alma, y eres cuerpo de esta sombra.” (you are the soul of this body and the body of this shade) – Sor Juana Inés De La Cruz

This series was inspired by the life and work of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, the 17th century Mexican nun who was one of the greatest poets and intellectuals of the American continent. She created the most renowned salon of her time from behind the bars of her cloistered cell. And in that cell she studied science and philosophy, wrote poems, plays and music and championed women’s right to intellectual and spiritual freedom. In the end, after resisting valiantly for over twenty years, she was silenced by the Inquisition.

2. UN FEMME HABITÉE
[1990, New Orleans, published in Paris 1991]

“I am the savage angel that fell one morning into your garden of precepts” – Huidobro

This series was inspired by the poem ‘Altazor’ a surrealist epic written by the Chilean poet Vincente Huidobro in the 1920’s. It relates the journey of a cosmic being as his parachute falls through the universe – what he saw and what he felt. I recreated this journey with one woman in one room.

3. EL MUNDO INCANABLE DE SUSANA SAN JUAN
(THE UNREACHABLE WORLD OF SUSANA SAN JUAN)
[ca 1995, landscapes in Mexico, figures in New Orleans studio]

I came upon a small old town in ruins across the border from Laredo. My friend and model Jacqueline Miró explored it with me and I photographed her in it – a place like no other. Jacqueline happened to call her aunt after our first day of shooting, describing our adventure, and her aunt exclaimed: “You sound like you’re in Pedro Páramo!” This was the name of a novel by Juan Rulfo, a tragic story set in Mexico. I read the book and realized it was a perfect fit, a synchronistic coincidence with my images.

The setting is a town in ruins; the characters are souls wandering in it doing penance, telling their stories. Among them is Susana San Juan ,whose entire discourse is one of memory and delusion. It is the story of a woman forced to take refuge in madness as a means of protecting her inner world from the ravages of the forces around her – a cruel and tyrannical patriarchy, a church that offers no redemption, the senseless violence of revolution, death itself.
The character of Susana San Juan was particularly compelling to me in that had it not been for an accident of history I might well have shared her fate. The fact that I was born fifty years later just a little north on the United States side of the border made it possible for me to find a way out – photography – which I have used to tell her story, my story and the story of many women living in this country but sharing that legacy. It is my homage to Mexico, Juan Rulfo and Susana San Juans everywhere who will not be possessed.

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Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: bolo de aipim

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Bate Papo! Start your morning off with some delicious bolo de aipim (cassava cake). We’ll be outside the LBC on the patio of Pocket Park (next to bookstore in case of rain).

This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

CALL FOR PAPERS: 65th Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies

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Proposal Submission Deadline: November 1, 2017

The Center for Latin American Studies at Vanderbilt University is pleased to host the 65th Annual Meeting of SECOLAS in Nashville, Tennessee from Thursday, March 8 to Sunday, March 11, 2018. SECOLAS invites faculty members, independent scholars, and students to submit panel and individual paper proposals for participation in the conference.

SECOLAS welcomes submissions on any aspect of Latin American and/or Caribbean Studies.

Graduate student presenters will be eligible to submit their paper for the Edward H. Moseley Student Paper Award for the best paper presented at the SECOLAS meeting.

After the conference, all presenters will be eligible to submit their paper for publication consideration in the SECOLAS Annals issue of The Latin Americanist, an international, peer-reviewed journal published by SECOLAS and Wiley Blackwell.

To submit your abstract proposal, click through to the online submission form.

SECOLAS 2018 Program Chairs
History and Social Sciences
Lily Balloffet
History Department
Western Carolina University
lgballoffet@wcu.edu

Literature and Humanities
Amy Borja
Modern Languages Department
University of Dallas
aborja@udallas.edu

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: pavé

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Bate Papo! Our fearless leader will be attempting pavé, a Brazilian layer dessert, for the first time. Come gauge her efforts!

This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Tulane to Host Talks for Haitian Studies Association Conference on Paradoxes, Contradictions, and Intersections in the Making of a People

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The Haitian Studies Association will hold its 29th Annual Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, a site that offers scholars a look at how the “making of the people” occurs outside of the geopolitical spaces associated with a nation-state. Indeed, the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 forced not only the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, but also the migration of slaves, slave owners, and free blacks and mulattos between the two former French territories. These movements of people led to the creation of new spaces where migrants linked to an emergent Haiti would become part of a new North American dynamic also characterized by inequalities and exclusion.

The Haitian Studies Association seeks a diverse set of scholarly interrogations of these themes from disciplines across the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. We are especially interested in fully constituted panels, and will prioritize panels that speak directly to our themes and attempt an interdisciplinary dialogue.

Panel and roundtable proposals are to be no longer than 500 words, clearly listing the individual paper titles and authors. Individual paper abstracts should be around 250 words. Presenters are expected to register for the conference in advance to ensure their names are in the program.

Proposals with be accepted until June 1st, 2017. Fore information regarding the conference and guidelines for proposals, click here.

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: brigadeiro cake

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Bate Papo! We’re expanding on the brigadeiro madness. Next up: brigadeiro cake! We’ll be outside the LBC on the patio of Pocket Park (next to bookstore in case of rain).

This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Call for Papers: Association of Academic Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean 2018 Conference

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The Association for Academic Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean (AAPLAC) seeks session proposals for its 29th Annual Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 21-24, 2018, hosted by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.

This year’s theme, “Study Abroad: Meeting the Challenges of Cultural Engagement,” includes a variety of paper topics, including:

  • New Orleans after Katrina: The impact of the growing Hispanic population which came to help with rebuilding and has since stayed on
  • Interdisciplinary Institutional Content Assessment: How to best track what students are doing overseas and the benefits for our campuses
  • Global Partnerships through Peer Collaboration: How we can better work with institutions in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Research Collaborations – U.S.-Latin America: Faculty led/student participation in on-site studies
  • Anglo-Hispanic Challenges: Cross-cultural understanding through experiential learning and study abroad
  • Strategic Partnerships: How we can enhance protocols between our schools in the US and those in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Strengthening AAPLAC Relationships through Inter-Organization Mentoring: How we can enhance protocols amongst our schools in the US
  • Latina Empowerment: More women on study abroad programs: How we can take advantage of this bond between women of the North and the South
  • Rethinking Mobility: How is the student’s identity compromised/enhanced abroad?
  • Community-Based Partnerships: How students can learn as they engage with local communities in working type environments
  • Crossing Borders: The eternal quest for a global space as students interact with the other
  • Global Xenophobia on the Rise of Brexit/Trump? What is our role?
  • Cuba: Future U.S. Relations – Impact on Study Abroad

Please visit the Call For Papers web page to download the proposal template, timeline, and more information about the conference.

For questions, please contact Laura Wise Person at 862-8629 or lwise1_at_tulane.edu.