Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

"Ahk'ab: Darkness and the Night among the Classic Maya," a talk by Marc Zender

September 9th, 2011 - September 12th, 2011
4:00 pm

Location
Room 102, Dinwiddie Hall, Uptown Campus

TO BE RESCHEDULED, PLEASE CHECK BACK SOON.

Ancient Mesoamericans regarded the night as an alien landscape antithetical and inimical to human interests. Both the dualistic opposite and ceaseless, antagonistic counterpart of "day" - of brightness, heat and life - "night" encoded the utter absence of everything associated with the world of the sun; it provided a daily period of danger and liminality to human lives, and a threatening landscape of darkness, cold and death. For the Classic Maya especially, the night was peopled with predatory, rapacious animals such as jaguars, bats, owls and mosquitos, all of which were marked in writing and art as "nocturnal," and unvaryingly associated with disease, ill omen and death. Widely regarded as an "unnatural" time and place, with eclipses simply providing the most extreme examples of the unceasing attacks of darkness on the world of the sun, night was a period to be passed in fearful watch and a landscape only be traveled.

A Reception with snacks and soda will follow the talk.

Marc Zender is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Tulane and is teaching Classical Nahuatl, Intermediate Mayan Hieroglyphics, and History of Writing. Mr. Zender has a Ph.D. in Archaeology from the University of Calgary and comes to Tulane from Harvard University where he was a Research Associate and Lecturer.

Sponsored by the Tulane Anthropology Student Association Colloquium

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Congreso internacional de literatura y cultura centroamericanas (CILCA XXIII)

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Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, y Purdue University Calumet tienen el gusto de invitar al CONGRESO DE LITERATURA y CULTURA CENTROAMERICANAS (CILCA XXIII) que se llevará a cabo en la ciudad de New Orleans, Louisiana, del 11 al 13 de marzo del 2015 en el campus de Tulane University y Loyola University New Orleans.

Desde el primer congreso realizado en Nicaragua 1993, CILCA se ha caracterizado por ser un espacio de intercambio intelectual y de amistad para académicas/os, escritoras/es y lectoras/es. El congreso se ha efectuado en todos los países centroamericanos y por primera vez en su historia, CILCA se realizará en los Estados Unidos. La ciudad escogida es Nueva Orleáns, puerta de entrada hacia el Caribe y los países de América Central. El intercambio cultural entre Nueva Orleáns y América Central ha sido intenso por muchísimos años, y la ciudad alberga una de las comunidades de origen hondureño más grandes de los Estados Unidos. Tulane University tiene estrechos lazos con la región a través del Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, y the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola University New Orleans se ha distinguido por el trabajo con las comunidades hispanas que realizan varias de sus unidades académicas, incluyendo the Law School y el Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

La organización de CILCA XXIII la realizan la Dra. Maureen Shea y el Dr. Uriel Quesada, expertos en literatura y cultura centroamericanas, con el apoyo del Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creador y promotor de CILCA.

La convocatoria será publicada en agosto 2014.

Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, and Purdue University Calumet invite you to the Congress on Literature and Culture of Central America (CILCA XXIII) which will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana March 11-13 2015 on the campuses of Tulane and Loyola New Orleans.

From the first conference, held in Nicaragua in 1993, CILCA has been a space for intellectual exchange and friendship for academics and writers. The conference has been held in all of the Central American countries and for the first time in its history will be held in the United States. New Orleans, the gateway to the Caribbean and Central America, has been chosen as the location. New Orleans and Central America have a longstanding cultural exchange and New Orleans has one of the largest Honduran communities in the United States. Tulane has long connections with the region through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, and the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola New Orleans works closely with hispanic communities particularly through the Law school and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

CILCA XXIII is organized by Drs. Maureen Shea and Uriel Quesada, experts on the literature and culture of Central America, with the support of Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creator of CILCA.

Call for papers coming in August 2014.