Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

South America

South America is the fourth largest of Earth’s seven continents (after Asia, Africa, and North America), occupying 17,820,900 sq km (6,880,700 sq mi), or 12 percent of Earth’s land surface. It lies astride the equator and tropic of Capricorn and is joined by the Isthmus of Panama, on the north, to Central and North America. The continent extends 7,400 km (4,600 mi) from the Caribbean Sea on the north to Cape Horn on the south, and its maximum width, between Ponta do Seixas, on Brazil’s Atlantic coast, and Punta Pariñas, on Peru’s Pacific coast, is 5,160 km (3,210 mi).

South America has a 2009 estimated population of 394 million, or 6 percent of the world’s people. The continent comprises 12 nations. Ten of the countries are Latin: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Two of the nations are former dependencies: Guyana, of the United Kingdom, and Suriname, of the Netherlands. South America also includes French Guiana, an overseas department of France. Located at great distances from the continent in the Pacific Ocean are several territories of South American republics: the Juan Fernández Islands and Easter Island (Chile) and the Galápagos Islands (Ecuador). Nearer the coast, in the Atlantic Ocean, is the Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, which is a Brazilian territory, and, farther south, the British dependency of the Falkland Islands, which is claimed by Argentina as the Islas Malvinas. The coastline of South America is relatively regular except in the extreme south and southwest, where it is indented by numerous fjords.

South America consists of four upland provinces, extending inland from the coasts, and, between them, three lowland provinces. The northern and western fringes are dominated by the Andes Mountains, the second highest mountain range in the world. Most of the eastern coast is fringed by the broader—and generally less elevated—highland areas of the Guiana and Brazilian massifs and the Patagonian Plateau. The main lowland is the vast Amazon Basin in the equatorial part of the continent; it is drained by the Amazon River, the world’s second longest river. The Orinoco River drains a lowland in the north; to the south lies the Paraguay-Paraná basin. The lowest point in South America (40 m/131 ft below sea level) is on Península Valdés in eastern Argentina, and the greatest elevation (6,960 m/22,834 ft) is atop Aconcagua in western Argentina, the highest peak in the Western Hemisphere.

MSN Encarta: South America

South America + People View All
Thomas F. Reese
SCLAS Executive Director. Professor - Art History
Marcello Canuto
Director - Middle American Research Institute, Professor - Anthropology
John Verano
Professor - Anthropology

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Congreso de Jornaleros: Experiences and Perspectives from Immigrant Workers in New Orleans

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The Congress of Day Laborers, an organization of immigrant workers and families founded by the day laborers who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina, is a leadership pipeline for hundreds of members into public life and social movement participation. A panel of immigrant leaders from Congreso will share how they have formed alliances across the community and influenced elected officials, as well as how students can help build a more tolerant society.

For more information please email Kate Rose (Vice President, BridgeTulane) at krose4@tulane.edu.

This event is sponsored by BridgeTulane, the Payson Graduate Program, the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Anthropology and the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice.

Newcomb Art Museum to host Archivist Panel for installation EMPIRE

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On Wednesday, April 25, join the Newcomb Art Museum for an incredible panel, moderated by Rebecca Snedeker, with the archivists of the various collections across Tulane as they discuss their responsibilities as cultural curators and the role od archives on campus.

In celebration of the New Orleans Tri-centennial, Newcomb Art Museum has on display an exhibit entitled EMPIRE, an immersive art installation by Los Angeles-based artists Fallen Fruit, from April 13, 2018 to July 7, 2018 on Tulane University’s uptown campus.

In EMPIRE, Fallen Fruit intentionally includes historical records, ephemeral artifacts, artworks and objects culled from various archives across Tulane’s campus and recontextualizes them in the museum. The archives include those from the Amistad Research Center, Hogan Jazz Archive, the Latin American Library, Louisiana Research Collection, Tulane Law Library, Tulane University Archives, Middle American Research Institute, Newcomb Art Museum, Newcomb College Institute, Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection/Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute and Southeastern Architectural Archive.

This panel is free and open to the public.

Featuring

Kara Olidge, Executive Director
Amistad Research Assistant

Alaina Hébert, Associate Curator of Graphics
Hogan Jazz Archive

Leon Miller, Head of the Louisiana Research Collection

Caroline Parris, Collections Manager
Middle American Research Institute

Sierra Polisar, Art Collections Manager & Registrar
Newcomb Art Museum

Chloe Raud, Head of Newcomb Archives and Vorhoff library Special Collections
Newcomb Art Institute

Justin Mann, Collections Manager
Royal D. Suttkus Fish Collection
Tulane University Biodiversity Research Institute

Kevin Williams, Archivist
Southeastern Architectural Archive

Ann Case, University Archivist
Howard-Tilton Memorial Library Tulane University Archives

Learn more about the installation by visiting the Newcomb Art Museum’s website. The exhibition has also been featured in the Tulane Hullabaloo and Tulane New Wave.

Chantalle Verna to Present Research on U.S. and Haitian Relationships in Post-Occupation Haiti

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Join us at the Stone Center for Latin American Studies in welcoming Dr. Chantalle Verna for a talk on her book Haiti and the Uses of America: Post- U.S. Occupation Promises on April 26, 2018, at 6:00 PM.

In her book, Dr. Verna makes evident that there have been key moments of cooperation that contributed to nation-building in both countries. Dr. Verna emphasizes the importance of examining the post-occupation period: the decades that followed the U.S. military occupation of Haiti (1915-34) and considering how Haiti’s public officials and privileged citizens rationalized nurturing ties with the United States at the very moment when the two nations began negotiating the reinstatement of Haitian sovereignty in 1930. Their efforts, Dr. Verna shows, helped favorable ideas about the United States, once held by a small segment of Haitian society, circulate more widely. In this way, Haitians contributed to and capitalized upon the spread of internationalism in the Americas and the larger world.

Dr. Verna received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University and is currently a professor in the History Department in Florida International University’s School of International and Public Affairs. Dr. Verna focuses on the culture of foreign relations, specifically concerning Haiti and the United States during the mid-twentieth century.

Co-sponsored by: Department of History, Graduate Studies Student Association, Newcomb College Institute and XUTULAC (the Xavier and Tulane Latin American & Caribbean Studies Partnership).

Fridays at Newcomb to host Sabia McCoy-Torres for talk on the anthropology of dance

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Join us in welcoming Sabia McCoy-Torres who will present on her research in a talk titled, Shifting the Lens from Harm to Pleasure: What We Learn from Women in Dancehall. Sabia McCoy-Torres is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at Tulane University. She has a Ph.D. in social and cultural anthropology from Cornell University. Her research focuses on the English and Spanish speaking African Diaspora, race, gender, sexuality, transnationalism, and popular music and performance. Geographically, her work is based primarily in the United States and Coast Rica. Dr. McCoy-Torres’s work has been published in Transforming Anthropology and Black Music Research Journal.

The lecture includes a free lunch and is open to the public.

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: caipirão

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Bate Papo! Celebrate the end of the semester with a caipirão happy hour at the local watering hole. We’ll meet outside and quench our thirst while cramming for an exam or two or simply procrastinating. This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Decoding the Purity of an Icon

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Join us for paintings and installations by Mexican artist Belinda Flores-Shinshillas in collaboration with the New Orleans Hispanic Heritage Foundation and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies this March.

The Webster’s dictionary defines purity as “being free from or unmixed with any other matter.” Decoding the Purity of an Icon is a series of 10 oil female portrait paintings on canvas and 2 installations thought by Flores-Shinshillas to convey the message of recording an individual’s appearance and personality, using the tradition of iconography for veneration of purity and spirituality beyond the representation of the feminine subject. These works of art have been approached in a contemporary manner, making these portraits much more than pure representation.