Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

The 8th Annual Tulane Maya Symposium & the Maya LARC Teacher Workshops

February 11th, 2011
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Location
Tulane University, Uptown Campus, Greenleaf Conference Room, 100 Jones Hall

Image courtesy of Michael Paul Sauder.

Classroom archaeology: Methods used to understand the lives of the ancient Maya
Diane Davies
9:00 AM
This workshop will discuss how to teach the subject of archaeology in the classroom in reference to the ancient Maya civilization. A general background to archaeology and what archaeologists do will be given, followed by techniques that archaeologists use to aid in the understanding of how the ancient Maya lived.

Mayan Lives in 21st Century Guatemala
Judith Maxwell
1:30 PM
Mayan peoples of Guatemala count their friends on Facebook as well as in base twenty. They carry cellphones, often in handwoven pouches designed for that purpose. They surf the internet, download and upload music, text-message and e-mail. They may commute to work either in urban offices, street markets, or local fields and sweatshops. They may worship in Catholic or Protestant Churches as well as on hillsides. They have recently won the right to give their children Mayan names and to ask that their children be educated, at least partially, in their own languages. Mayan activists have strategically deployed a checklist of essential Mayan traits to argue for their collective and human rights (Mayan cosmovision, Mayan language, Mayan dress). In this session, we will explore this trait list and some "traditional" cultural arenas, situating them within the modern socio-political context."

To register for these Friday workshops, please click here.

LATEST SITE UPDATES

More

Upcoming Events

Noon-Time Talk on Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898 with Lucia Abramovic

View Full Event Description

Join Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's curatorial fellow for Spanish colonial art for a Noontime Talk on the exhibition Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Noontime Talks are brief, informative discussions on exhibitions and installations in NOMA's galleries. Wednesdays are free admission days for Louisiana residents. Please visit the NOMA website for more information.

Mining, Privilege, and Artistic Production in the Colonial Andes: Short Film and Roundtable Discussion

View Full Event Description

This program includes a screening of Harun Farocki's film The Silver and the Cross (20 min), which examines a 1758 painting by Gaspar Miguel de Berrío that depicts the city and the surrounding silver mines of Potosí, Bolivia. A roundtable discussion featuring three local scholars of Colonial Latin America will follow the film. The discussion will employ the film's description of colonial Potosí as an anchor for a broader discussion about colonial Andean economics, history, and art, particularly as it relates to Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

The goal of this event is to better understand the mechanisms that created the level of wealth exhibited in Behind Closed Doors, and to shed light on an often overlooked city that was essential to the economic success of Spanish America for hundreds of years.

The roundtable discussants are Dr. Kris Lane, the France V. Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History, Department of History, Tulane University; Dr. John Charles, Associate Professor of Colonial Spanish American Literature and Director of Graduate Studies, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University; and Dr. Ari Zighelboim, Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University. Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's Curatorial Fellow for Spanish Colonial Art, will moderate the discussion.

About Dr. Kris Lane
Kris Lane holds the France V. Scholes Chair in Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University. His books include Quito 1599: City & Colony in Transition, Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires, and Pillaging the Empire: Piracy in the Americas, 1500-1750. He is currently writing a history of the great Potosí mint scandal of 1649, along with an annotated translation of early writings on Potosí.

About Dr. John Charles
John Charles is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University. He is the author of numerous articles on colonial Andean literature and history, and the book Allies at Odds: The Andean Church and Its Indigenous Agents, 1583-1671 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010).

About Dr. Ari Zighelboim
Ari Zighelboim (Lima, 1960) studied in Peru, Israel and the United States, graduating with a Bachelor's degree in history and East Asian studies, an MA in cultural anthropology and a PhD in Spanish and Latin American literature. His masters paper dealt with scenes of human sacrifice on mountains in Moche iconography, and his PhD thesis with the surviving Inca nobility during the colonial period in Peru and its cultural and social strategies. He has written about Ruben Dario, Juan de Espinosa Medrano, the drama in Quechua Ollantay, Potosí and other topics. He has also published a volume of poetry. He is now senior lecturer in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane university.

Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World

View Full Event Description

Assistant Professor Mia Bagneris will lecture on "Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World," on Friday, September 12 at 6pm at the New Orleans Museum of Art. The lecture will be held in conjunction with the exhibit, Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Professor Bagneris teaches African American/Diaspora art history and studies of race in Western Art. Her own work concentrates on the construction of race in British and American art and visual culture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Footprints in Time. 5 Generations of Mexican Artists at the Parota

View Full Event Description

The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to invite you to the Art Exhibition of Mexican Masters entitled “Footprints in Time. 5 Generations of Mexican Artists at the Parota.” The exhibit will feature works by Mexican artists Jose Luis Cuevas, Leonora Carrington, Alberto Castro Leñero, Manuel Felguerez, Gilberto Aceves Navarro, Francisco Toledo, and Roger Von Gunten among other.

The exhibit will run from August 29th to September 26th at the Art Gallery of the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans. An opening reception will be held on August 29th at 6 pm.

Information on La Parota:

The Fine Art Center “La Parota” was created in 1996, by the combined efforts of the Government of the State of Colima's Ministry of Culture and the National Council for Culture and the Arts. “The Parota” celebrates a long continuing artistic history, full of achievements and great national and international recognition. The participation of the most important Mexican Masters teaching production of printmaking workshops and Fine Arts have been carried out at this Centre with great success since its beginning.

“The Parota” has been an Institution for established masters and young talented artists. The exchange of knowledge, ideas and experiences given in the workshops have driven new etching techniques, while developing a new generation of Fine Art Printmakers.

With the passing of the years, the Fine Art Center of Colima “La Parota” has generated a wealth of artistic production with the most important artists of Mexico, while simultaneously producing some of the nation's most outstanding young artists.

Congreso internacional de literatura y cultura centroamericanas (CILCA XXIII)

View Full Event Description

Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, y Purdue University Calumet tienen el gusto de invitar al CONGRESO DE LITERATURA y CULTURA CENTROAMERICANAS (CILCA XXIII) que se llevará a cabo en la ciudad de New Orleans, Louisiana, del 11 al 13 de marzo del 2015 en el campus de Tulane University y Loyola University New Orleans.

Desde el primer congreso realizado en Nicaragua 1993, CILCA se ha caracterizado por ser un espacio de intercambio intelectual y de amistad para académicas/os, escritoras/es y lectoras/es. El congreso se ha efectuado en todos los países centroamericanos y por primera vez en su historia, CILCA se realizará en los Estados Unidos. La ciudad escogida es Nueva Orleáns, puerta de entrada hacia el Caribe y los países de América Central. El intercambio cultural entre Nueva Orleáns y América Central ha sido intenso por muchísimos años, y la ciudad alberga una de las comunidades de origen hondureño más grandes de los Estados Unidos. Tulane University tiene estrechos lazos con la región a través del Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, y the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola University New Orleans se ha distinguido por el trabajo con las comunidades hispanas que realizan varias de sus unidades académicas, incluyendo the Law School y el Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

La organización de CILCA XXIII la realizan la Dra. Maureen Shea y el Dr. Uriel Quesada, expertos en literatura y cultura centroamericanas, con el apoyo del Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creador y promotor de CILCA.

La convocatoria será publicada en agosto 2014.

Tulane University, Loyola University New Orleans, and Purdue University Calumet invite you to the Congress on Literature and Culture of Central America (CILCA XXIII) which will take place in New Orleans, Louisiana March 11-13 2015 on the campuses of Tulane and Loyola New Orleans.

From the first conference, held in Nicaragua in 1993, CILCA has been a space for intellectual exchange and friendship for academics and writers. The conference has been held in all of the Central American countries and for the first time in its history will be held in the United States. New Orleans, the gateway to the Caribbean and Central America, has been chosen as the location. New Orleans and Central America have a longstanding cultural exchange and New Orleans has one of the largest Honduran communities in the United States. Tulane has long connections with the region through the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the Latin American Library, and the Middle American Research Institute. Loyola New Orleans works closely with hispanic communities particularly through the Law school and the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

CILCA XXIII is organized by Drs. Maureen Shea and Uriel Quesada, experts on the literature and culture of Central America, with the support of Dr. Jorge Román Lagunas, creator of CILCA.

Call for papers coming in August 2014.