Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

UNO Empire and Solidarity in the Americas Conference

October 16th, 2009 - October 17th, 2009

Location
University of New Orleans

The 2009 Empire and Solidarity in the Americas Conference explores the past and present of consumer-based activism within the Americas. Since at least the 1940s, activists have developed strategies that attempt to engage with global markets in order to address a range of social justice issues. This political move by activists to privilege the market – and partially bypass the state – as an arena for generating change has become particularly salient under neoliberalism and warrants ongoing investigation and reflection. In different ways, the fair trade movement, as well as campaigns targeting particular products, corporations, or industries, have attempted to engage consumers in campaigns to reduce poverty and inequality, challenge labor and human rights abuses, improve environmental practices, support worker organizing, and stimulate popular organizations in Latin America, as well as educate northern consumers and challenge the global system of “free” trade. Can an inherently exploitative/unequal process – the northern consumption of southern commodities – also be a meaningful arena for international solidarity? How has the decision (or threat) to consume or not consume particular products in the United States been utilized as a form of solidarity with working people in Latin America? How have campaigns been used to pressure companies or industries to respect human and worker rights? What are the limitations, contradictions, successes/failures, and futures of consumption as an arena for solidarity between the North and South?

Open to the Public. Papers will be distributed prior to the conference. For more information, please contact Steve Striffler.

Invited Participants

  • Sandy Brown, doctoral candidate in Geography, University of California-Berkeley, is currently conducting research on Ecuador’s Fair Trade banana industry.
  • Aviva Chomsky, Professor of History and Coordinator of Latin American Studies, Salem State College, and author of Linked Labor Histories: New England, Colombia, and the Making of a Global Working Class.
  • Dana Frank, Professor of History and Director of the Center for Labor Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, and author of Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America.
  • Henry Frundt, Professor of Sociology, Ramapo College, and author of Fair Bananas!: Farmers, Workers, and Consumers Strive to Change an Industry.
  • Lesley Gill, Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, and author of The School of the Americas: Military Training and Political Violence in the Americas.
  • Daniel Jaffee, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Washington State University, and author of Brewing Justice: Fair Trade Coffee, Sustainability and Survival.
  • Gay Seidman, Professor of Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and author of Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights and Transnational Activism.
  • Walter Stern, graduate student in history, Tulane University, is conducting research on the United Fruit Company.
  • Steve Striffler, Professor of Latin American Studies and Anthropology, The University of New Orleans, and author of Chicken: The Dangerous Transformation of America’s Favorite Food.

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Upcoming Events

Bate Papo! Practice your Portuguese and enjoy some Brazilian treats: cocadas

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Special Edition Bate Papo! Celebrate Black History Month with students of Portuguese and Africana Studies. We’ll be sampling sweet cocadas while we expose the injustices of Brazil’s slave trade with a reading of “Navio Negreiro” by Castro Alves. We’ll be outside the LBC on the patio of Pocket Park (next to bookstore in case of rain). This event is sponsored by TULASO and the Stone Center for Latin American Studies. Admission is free. All levels welcome. For more information, please contact Megwen at mloveles@tulane.edu.

Political Seminar Series: "The Durability of Revolutionary Regimes"

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Steven Levitsky is Professor of Government at Harvard University. His research interests include political parties, authoritarianism and democratization, and weak and informal institutions, with a focus on Latin America. He is author of Transforming Labor-Based Parties in Latin America: Argentine Peronism in Comparative Perspective, co-author (with Lucan Way) of Competitive Authoritarianism: Hybrid Regimes after the Cold War (2010), and co-editor of Argentine Democracy: The Politics of Institutional Weakness (2005); Informal Institutions and Democracy: Lessons from Latin America (2006); and The Resurgence of the Left in Latin America (2011). He is currently engaged in research on the durability of revolutionary regimes, the relationship between populism and competitive authoritarianism, problems of party-building in contemporary Latin America, and party collapse and its consequences for democracy in Peru.

This event is sponsored by CIPR.

Poetry Reading: Navio Negreiro "The Slave Ship"

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Finish out Black History Month with a tragic look at the Middle Passage through the poetry of Castro Alves. We will read the poem in its original Portuguese and provide a translation. Indulge in cocadas, small coconut sweets (akin to pralines), representative of the sugar boom economy that relied on slave labor.

For more information please contact mloveles@tulane.edu or adderley@tulane.edu.

Join us afterwards for a Bate Papo!

MARI Brown Bag Series to host Jessica J. Price for a talk on Indigenous Mexican Protests

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The Middle American Research Institute is happy to announce the eight talk of the 2017-2018 Brown Bag talk series. Dr. Jessica J. Price, Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center for Inter-American Policy & Research, Tulane University, will present on her research in a talk entitled We Will Not Be Quiet: The Dynamics of Protest in Indigenous Mexico.

MARI’s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Jessica Melancon (jmelanc1@tulane.edu) for more information.

29th Annual AAPLAC Conference

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The Association for Academic Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean (AAPLAC) will hold its 29th Annual Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, February 21-24, 2018, hosted by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University.

AAPLAC is an organization that facilitates and supports study abroad programming among Latin American, Caribbean and US institutions of higher learning and organizations dedicated to the promotion of cross-cultural, academic-based experiences.

This year’s theme, “Study Abroad: Meeting the Challenges of Cultural Engagement,” will include a variety of paper topics:

  • New Orleans after Katrina: The impact of the growing Hispanic population which came to help with rebuilding and has since stayed on
  • Interdisciplinary Institutional Content Assessment: How to best track what students are doing overseas and the benefits for our campuses
  • Global Partnerships through Peer Collaboration: How we can better work with institutions in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Research Collaborations – U.S.-Latin America: Faculty led/student participation in on-site studies
  • Anglo-Hispanic Challenges: Cross-cultural understanding through experiential learning and study abroad
  • Strategic Partnerships: How we can enhance protocols between our schools in the US and those in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • Strengthening AAPLAC Relationships through Inter-Organization Mentoring: How we can enhance protocols amongst our schools in the US
  • Latina Empowerment: More women on study abroad programs: How we can take advantage of this bond between women of the North and the South
  • Rethinking Mobility: How is the student’s identity compromised/enhanced abroad?
  • Community-Based Partnerships: How students can learn as they engage with local communities in working type environments
  • Crossing Borders: The eternal quest for a global space as students interact with the other
  • Global Xenophobia on the Rise of Brexit/Trump? What is our role?
  • Cuba: Future U.S. Relations – Impact on Study Abroad

Our Call for Papers has now closed, but we encourage non-presenters and presenters alike to register for the conference. Any interested faculty, staff, and students from local and international universities, institutions, and study abroad providers are welcome. Registration is now open through February 1st.

A pre-conference workshop from the Forum on Education Abroad is also open to any conference participants. We encourage registration for this “Health, Safety, Security, & Risk Management (Standard 8)” workshop by February 2nd. Click here for registration and more information.

For questions, please contact Laura Wise Person at 862-8629 or lwise1@tulane.edu.

Latin American Graduate Oraganization (LAGO) 2018 Conference

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The Latin American Graduate Organization will be hosting its 2018 Latin American Studies Conference titled Thinking of the Future: Expanding the possible in the Americas (Pensando en el porvenir: Expandiendo lo posible en las Américas) February 23 – 25, 2018, at Tulane University, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

This year, the conference topic is meant to challenge academics and activists to move beyond critiques and recommendations of how to address modern days issues, and instead articulate a vision of and for the future.

The LAGO Conference welcomes all disciplines and all approaches, as long as the project attempts to grapple with the idea of building something better. This is a Latin American Studies Conference, but creative writers, journalists, artists, performers, organizers, lawyers and healthcare providers as well as graduate students and other academics are welcome. Proposals are accepted in Spanish, Portuguese, Haitian Creole, and English.

Please contact lago.tulane@gmail.com with questions. For more information, visit the official conference website.