Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Images of the Old Southwest

July 23rd, 2010

By: New Wave staff
newwave@tulane.edu

Photo: This image, Leisure Time at George Pepper's Tent, is part of the new museum exhibit. (Hand-colored glass lantern slides courtesy of Tulane University's Middle American Research Institute.)

The New Orleans Museum of Art will unveil a little-known American Indian archive from Tulane University on Saturday (July 24). "Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the 20th Century" is the first comprehensive presentation of photography, artifacts and archival research from the George Hubbard Pepper Native American Archive.

In collaboration with the Middle American Research Institute and the Latin American Library at Tulane, the exhibition offers a special glimpse of the Tulane archive featuring 150 objects from Pepper's personal art collection as well as 140 photographic images. It will be on display until Oct. 24.

Pepper, a museum ethnologist and scholar, used textiles, pottery, baskets and other Pueblo and Navajo paraphernalia as visual complements to his lectures. Many of the images and the objects in "Ancestors and Descendants" have never been published or seen by the general public since 1924.?

"There has never been an opportunity to bring together this many items from the Pepper archive," says Paul Tarver, curator of the exhibit. "Even in his lifetime, Pepper could only display a handful of objects with a few dozen images he projected through a magic lantern. This is the first time the breadth of the archive has been researched and displayed."


Sumner W. Matteson's photo is titled Portrait of Hopi Maiden with Hair Whorls, 1901.

The exhibit documents the relationship between American Indians and the scientists, photographers and tourists who traveled to New Mexico and Arizona at the turn of the 20th century. It is co-curated by Cristin J. Nunez, who received a master’s degree in art history from Tulane in 2009.

"For the past two years, I have been working on this museum exhibition and catalog in collaboration with the New Orleans Museum of Art and Tulane University," Nunez says.

"We were very excited to be awarded grants from the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and the Cudd Foundation, but we were thrilled when we received a large grant from the National Endowment for the Arts,"? she says.

On Wednesday (July 28) at 6 p.m., there will be a free exhibition walk-through at the New Orleans Museum of Art with the curator and co-curator, followed by live music by Flow Tribe from 7-8 p.m.

Entrance to the museum is free at all times to anyone with a valid Tulane I.D.

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Upcoming Events

Bruno Bosteels speaks at Loyola University

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The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Loyola University presents: “Politics and Violence in Latin America: Democracy in the Criticism of Arms,” a talk by Bruno Bosteels, Professor of Romance Studies at Cornell University. Bosteels is the author of Badiou and Politics, Marx and Freud in Latin America, and The Actuality of Communism, among other works.

For more information on this event, please contact Josefa Salmon at salmon@loyno.edu.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies and the Caribbean, The Languages & Cultures Department at Loyola University, Rev. Scott Youree Watson, Gregory F. Curtin & Rev. Guy Lemieux SJ SAK Distinguished Professorships.

For the event flyer, click here.

The Pebbles Center turns 10!

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The Pebbles Center is celebrating its 10th Anniversary! The 10th anniversary falls on Dia, a celebration of children and reading. To celebrate, the Pebbles Center is hosting renowned children’s book author Jorge Argueta. Mr. Argueta was a guest at the inauguration of the Pebbles Center 10 years ago. See photographs from Mr. Argueta’s previous visit here. He will present an interactive presentation based on some of his most recent books.

Jorge Tetl Argueta is a celebrated Salvadoran poet and writer whose bi-lingual children’s books have received numerous awards. A native Salvadoran and Pipil Nahua Indian, Jorge spent much of his childhood in rural El Salvador. He feels that everybody is capable of writing, especially young children who are natural poets! Argueta has written a series of delicious cooking poems perfect for reading while cooking or incorporating food into the classroom. Come out and celebrate with us!

Children and parents will be able to enjoy a wonderful reading and a workshop highlighting the delicious foods found in his books. We will be of course providing snacks as well as be able to distribute a handful of bilingual books donated by the New Orleans Public Library.

El 30 de abril es una fecha muy significativa para los niños. Se celebra el día de los niños y de los libros. Esta celebración se conoce como El día de los niños/ El día de los libros, y celebra la alegría y las maravillas de la infancia y la importancia de los libros en nuestra vida. Ven a celebrar con nosotros el día con autor salvadoreño Jorge Argueta.

Para una lista con la dirreción de todas las bibliotecas, por favor visite la página de web de la biblioteca pública de la Nueva Orleáns.

For more information or if you have questions please contact the Latin American Resource Center at crcrts@tulane.edu or check our Facebook page.

Sponsored by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies, and the New Orleans Public Library.

Photo by Nina Menconi.

Art Syncopation

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans and the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival are pleased to present an art exhibit of renowned artist Angel Gonzalez de la Tijera entitled “Art Syncopation.” An opening reception will be held on April 22nd at 6 PM. The exhibit will be on display through May 20th.

Angel Gonzalez de la Tijera is an important Mexican Painter and one of the most significant contributors to contemporary figurative Mexican art. His work primarily focuses on figures and portraits in conjunction with music. His art reveals form and substance in a realistic manner.

Gonzalez de la Tijera was born in Mexico City in 1958. He developed his painting style, figurative realism, as a student of master painter Santiago Carbonell.