Roger Thayer Stone Center For Latin American Studies

Tulane University

Xelaju Korda

Student - Ph.D Candidate

Xela Korda was awarded her M.A. in Latin American Studies with distinction from Tulane in 2006 after completing a thesis entitled "Aesthetics of (In)Security: Mentally Mapping Morumbi". She has traveled extensively throughout Latin America and Europe, particularly in Brazil. As a master's student, Xela served as a summer teaching and research assistant to Tulane faculty in both São Paulo and Curitiba, Brazil. She also served as a teaching assistant to Dr. Martha Huggins of the Department of Sociology during the spring of 2007 for courses on Brazilian society and the sociology of deviance. In addition to serving as a teaching assistant, Xela has taught for the Stone Center and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. She has presented her research nationally and internationally, most recently in 2009 at the SECOLAS conference held in New Orleans where she presented her paper, "Sand Cinderellas and Lesbian Prostitutes: Sexuality, Gender Performances, and Secrecy in NE Brazil." Xela has been the recipient of numerous awards and grants, including two FLAS summer language immersion fellowships and a grant from the Tinker Foundation to conduct research in São Paulo. In 2007, she was awarded an SSRC Dissertation Prospectus Development Fellowship for summer pilot study and workshops and in 2010 she received an SLA merit fellowship from Tulane. While at the Stone Center, Xela has won both the Richard E. Greenleaf Award for best graduate paper in the Social Sciences written by a Latin American Studies graduate student as well as the Donald Robertson Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching in Latin American Studies. During the summer of 2010, Xela worked for the Robertson Scholar’s program out of Duke / UNC as an onsite liaison for their 10 scholars completing internships in New Orleans.

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Upcoming Events

Noon-Time Talk on Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898 with Lucia Abramovic

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Join Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's curatorial fellow for Spanish colonial art for a Noontime Talk on the exhibition Behind Closed Doors, Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Noontime Talks are brief, informative discussions on exhibitions and installations in NOMA's galleries. Wednesdays are free admission days for Louisiana residents. Please visit the NOMA website for more information.

MARI Brown Bag: Marcello Canuto, "The Tombs of La Corona: La Noblesse Oblige"

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Marcello Canuto, Director of the Middle American Research Institute at Tulane University, will present about his recent investigations at La Corona. The talk will focus on tombs discovered during the 2014 field season and the information these tombs provides about the broader socio-political relationships at La Corona.

M.A.R.I.'s Brown Bag talk series is meant to provide a venue for students and faculty focusing on topics related to Mesoamerica to discuss their latest research in an informal and friendly setting. If you are interested in presenting, please email Marcello Canuto (mcanuto@tulane.edu) for more information. For the current speaker list of this talk series, please click here.

Please remember to bring your lunch!

Mining, Privilege, and Artistic Production in the Colonial Andes: Short Film and Roundtable Discussion

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This program includes a screening of Harun Farocki's film The Silver and the Cross (20 min), which examines a 1758 painting by Gaspar Miguel de Berrío that depicts the city and the surrounding silver mines of Potosí, Bolivia. A roundtable discussion featuring three local scholars of Colonial Latin America will follow the film. The discussion will employ the film's description of colonial Potosí as an anchor for a broader discussion about colonial Andean economics, history, and art, particularly as it relates to Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

The goal of this event is to better understand the mechanisms that created the level of wealth exhibited in Behind Closed Doors, and to shed light on an often overlooked city that was essential to the economic success of Spanish America for hundreds of years.

The roundtable discussants are Dr. Kris Lane, the France V. Scholes Professor of Colonial Latin American History, Department of History, Tulane University; Dr. John Charles, Associate Professor of Colonial Spanish American Literature and Director of Graduate Studies, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University; and Dr. Ari Zighelboim, Lecturer, Spanish and Portuguese Department, Tulane University. Lucia Abramovich, NOMA's Curatorial Fellow for Spanish Colonial Art, will moderate the discussion.

About Dr. Kris Lane
Kris Lane holds the France V. Scholes Chair in Colonial Latin American History at Tulane University. His books include Quito 1599: City & Colony in Transition, Colour of Paradise: The Emerald in the Age of Gunpowder Empires, and Pillaging the Empire: Piracy in the Americas, 1500-1750. He is currently writing a history of the great Potosí mint scandal of 1649, along with an annotated translation of early writings on Potosí.

About Dr. John Charles
John Charles is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane University. He is the author of numerous articles on colonial Andean literature and history, and the book Allies at Odds: The Andean Church and Its Indigenous Agents, 1583-1671 (University of New Mexico Press, 2010).

About Dr. Ari Zighelboim
Ari Zighelboim (Lima, 1960) studied in Peru, Israel and the United States, graduating with a Bachelor's degree in history and East Asian studies, an MA in cultural anthropology and a PhD in Spanish and Latin American literature. His masters paper dealt with scenes of human sacrifice on mountains in Moche iconography, and his PhD thesis with the surviving Inca nobility during the colonial period in Peru and its cultural and social strategies. He has written about Ruben Dario, Juan de Espinosa Medrano, the drama in Quechua Ollantay, Potosí and other topics. He has also published a volume of poetry. He is now senior lecturer in the department of Spanish and Portuguese at Tulane university.

Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World

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Assistant Professor Mia Bagneris will lecture on "Reimagining Race, Class, and Identity in the New World," on Friday, September 12 at 6pm at the New Orleans Museum of Art. The lecture will be held in conjunction with the exhibit, Behind Closed Doors: Art in the Spanish American Home, 1492-1898.

Professor Bagneris teaches African American/Diaspora art history and studies of race in Western Art. Her own work concentrates on the construction of race in British and American art and visual culture of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Footprints in Time. 5 Generations of Mexican Artists at the Parota

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The Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans is pleased to invite you to the Art Exhibition of Mexican Masters entitled “Footprints in Time. 5 Generations of Mexican Artists at the Parota.” The exhibit will feature works by Mexican artists Jose Luis Cuevas, Leonora Carrington, Alberto Castro Leñero, Manuel Felguerez, Gilberto Aceves Navarro, Francisco Toledo, and Roger Von Gunten among other.

The exhibit will run from August 29th to September 26th at the Art Gallery of the Consulate of Mexico in New Orleans. An opening reception will be held on August 29th at 6 pm.

Information on La Parota:

The Fine Art Center “La Parota” was created in 1996, by the combined efforts of the Government of the State of Colima's Ministry of Culture and the National Council for Culture and the Arts. “The Parota” celebrates a long continuing artistic history, full of achievements and great national and international recognition. The participation of the most important Mexican Masters teaching production of printmaking workshops and Fine Arts have been carried out at this Centre with great success since its beginning.

“The Parota” has been an Institution for established masters and young talented artists. The exchange of knowledge, ideas and experiences given in the workshops have driven new etching techniques, while developing a new generation of Fine Art Printmakers.

With the passing of the years, the Fine Art Center of Colima “La Parota” has generated a wealth of artistic production with the most important artists of Mexico, while simultaneously producing some of the nation's most outstanding young artists.

Celebración Latina

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Our annual family festival marks the end of Hispanic Heritage month. Please join us at the zoo to explore and celebrate the rich diversity of Latin America. Celebración Latina at the Zoo's Capital One Stage and Field will offer a true taste of the Latin American culture with live music, children’s activities and authentic Latin cuisine prepared and sold by local restaurants. Local artisans will sell hand made crafts, and local social service, health and education organizations will offer wellness, education and social service information.

Check out pictures from the 2012 and 2013 festivals!

Celebración Latina is presented by the Stone Center for Latin American Studies at Tulane University. Contributing sponsors include Pan-American Life Insurance Group and Jefferson Financial Credit Union.

Celebración Latina is free with Zoo admission. No outside food or beverages please!

For more information please visit the Audubon website.